Sata Drives not recognized in Disk Director

Discussion in 'Acronis Disk Director Suite' started by Atreyu, Nov 17, 2007.

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  1. Atreyu

    Atreyu Registered Member

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    I recently switched motherboards from an ASUS P5N32-SLI to an Intel DQ965GF. The BIOS on the new board recognizes all drives (2 SATA hard drives, 1 SATA DVD/CD ROM, 1 IDE DVD/CD ROM, 1 ZIP Drive and a floppy drive). However, when I start the computer with the Acronis Media Builder boot disk to fomat the harddrives, it starts, I select the full version of Disk Director, and after a few moments it tells me that it doesn't see any hard drives.

    I'm running Windows XP SP2 and Disk Director build 10:2160.

    Does anyone have a clue as to what my problem might be and where to go for a fix?

    Thank you in advance.

    Atreyu
     
  2. MudCrab

    MudCrab Imaging Specialist

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    Does the Safe Mode version see all your drives?
     
  3. Atreyu

    Atreyu Registered Member

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    MudCrab,
    Thanks for responding. You were right. Loading Disk Director is safe mode did the trick. I saw the drives and was successful in re-formating them.

    Thanks for the information (although I don't understand why the safemode version worked and not the full version).

    Atreyu
     
  4. MudCrab

    MudCrab Imaging Specialist

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    The Safe Mode version is DOS-based and accesses the hardware through the computer's BIOS.

    The Full Mode version is Linux-based and uses Linux drivers to access the hardware. Sometimes the drivers don't correctly recognize the hardware and so it can't find any drives.
     
  5. davcbr

    davcbr Registered Member

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    Mudcrab
    Could you possibly elaborate on the differences between "Full" and "Safe" mode. Is there an advantage to using Linux for these tasks over a DOS based system? If I use safe mode to change partitions, is it any more likely to throw an error?

    dc
     
  6. K0LO

    K0LO Registered Member

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    dc:

    Using "Full" mode is preferred IF your hardware is supported because full mode gives you access to SATA, RAID, and external USB drives as well as access to the network.

    The "Safe" mode version is provided in case your hardware is not supported with the current Linux drivers included with DD. In safe mode you will be able to access internal hard disks but usually you will not be able to see external USB hard disks unless you have a PC whose BIOS enumerates USB drives. Also, connection to a network is not supported in safe mode.

    Use of Full mode is usually recommended unless you have problems. Then you can try safe mode with limited device support.
     
  7. MudCrab

    MudCrab Imaging Specialist

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    davcbr

    I tend to use the Safe Mode version of DD a lot more than the Full Mode just because I use DD a lot and the Safe Mode version boots a lot faster. Also, I prefer to use the Safe Mode version when working with multi-partition flashdrives as it sees the flashdrive exactly the same as the computer's BIOS.

    If I'm working on something that requires a lot of switching between DD and TI, then I use BartPE so I can just switch programs instead of having to reboot between each step.
     
  8. davcbr

    davcbr Registered Member

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    That works for me. One last thing...
    I think, but I may be wrong, that this problem does not affect the op system selector. This is one of the reasons I got this product. T / F ?

    thanx

    dc
     
  9. MudCrab

    MudCrab Imaging Specialist

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    Do you mean that DD will not mess with the MBR or change Windows boot loading setups or another third party's boot manager? This is true as long as you don't do the changes manually. You can use DD's Disk Editor to edit any part of your drive including the MBR, boot sectors, etc.

    If you mean OSS, then no. OSS will modify the MBR and take over the booting process. If you already have a boot manager installed and want to keep using it, do not install OSS.
     
  10. davcbr

    davcbr Registered Member

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    Actually, I was asking if the boot selector [usually referred to as OSS] runs using the linux boot that is causing all the disk recognition problems.

    dc
     
  11. MudCrab

    MudCrab Imaging Specialist

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    Using OSS will not have any effect on DD or TI or any other programs recognizing drives. OSS only controls the booting. Once whatever you booted is running, it has control. Also, if you boot from a CD before the hard drive, OSS is never even started.

    As far as I know, OSS does not use Linux. It accesses the hardware through the computer's BIOS (like the Safe Mode of DD).
     
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