Sandisk USB stick - can't remove 'crapware' in Linux

Discussion in 'all things UNIX' started by Ocky, Apr 10, 2010.

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  1. Ocky

    Ocky Registered Member

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    Bought a Sandisk Cruzer 8GB stick today. When I inserted it I was surprised to see two icons on my desktop, one a cd icon named U3 System (for the Launch U3 app.)

    Sandisk.png

    The 'pseudo' cd contains these 3 files ... (all read only)

    U3.png

    On further investigation I found out that it is nigh impossible to remove (in Linux) this phantom cd which probably has it's own hidden partition. Deleting and formatting in gparted does nothing. Apparently there is a way to remove it in Linux but it's rather complicated and requires the use of a special removal tool .. http://u3-tool.sourceforge.net/
    However it can be rather easily removed in Windows by running an uninstaller contained in the LaunchPad.zip (maybe also via Device Manager) or by obtaining the removal tool from Sandisk.
    I do not have a Windows machine so will ask a friend to help.

    Groan ! It would have helped had the packaging indicated that the stick comes bundled with the U3 Launchpad application instead of surpising the purchaser when first using the stick. I hate that.
     
  2. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Running that tool is no different than running a Windows tool.
    Oh, I know there's an HP utility lying about, I need to find it ...
    Mrk
     
  3. linuxforall

    linuxforall Registered Member

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  4. Carver

    Carver Registered Member

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    When I found out about the 3 files I made up my mind that I was going to Zero it out first, I first ran file recovery utility with no specific target to find out just what was on the drive before that was deleted. I got a list of at least 30 names that were in japenese. Then I finished just what I wanted to do and Zeroed the drive out.
     
  5. Ocky

    Ocky Registered Member

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    The damn u3-tool is actually in the Karmic universe repo - but it doesn't work. However the Lucid version works great. Here is what I did ..

    u3-tool.png

    The pesky 'virtual' cd partition containing those 3 files is gone. :thumb:
    (See how they spell 'wiped' and 'existing')

    Edit: Link to Lucid version:- http://packages.ubuntu.com/lucid/amd64/u3-tool/download
     
  6. Ocky

    Ocky Registered Member

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    I will be using it for some backups with grsync. What would be best - formatting the usb stick in ntfs or just leave it as fat32 fs. ?
    I won't transfer files larger than 4GB but am wondering about wear and tear if switching to ntfs.
     
  7. linuxforall

    linuxforall Registered Member

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    FAT 32 makes it most compatible but why would ntfs destroy the drive may I ask?
     
  8. Ocky

    Ocky Registered Member

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    I didn't mention 'destroy' :argh: - was just under the impression that there might be more wear and tear over time. Not important. I have formatted it to ntfs mainly because grsync threw up some warnings related to the length of file names and excluded those from the backup. With ntfs there are zero errors. :)
     
  9. linuxforall

    linuxforall Registered Member

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    NTFS fragments less so it will put less wear on the drive, in case of USB and SSD it doesn't really matter as there is no needed or platter.
     
  10. NGRhodes

    NGRhodes Registered Member

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    How would increase in fragmentation give an increase in wear ?

    NTFS contains a journal (which FAT does not) which increases write activity to the filesystem, as the changes have to be logged in the journal then the changes written, then the journal entries deleted.
     
  11. Ocky

    Ocky Registered Member

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    Ah, yes of course ntfs like linux ext uses the journaling file system. linuxforall is right in saying it doesn't matter with usb flash drives as they have no disk.
    Thanks Nick.
     
  12. linuxforall

    linuxforall Registered Member

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    A less fragmented hdd puts less wear and tear on the needle as it doesn't have to go seeking for all the files. Specially during frequent read/write process but all this is moot point for SSD.
     
  13. lotuseclat79

    lotuseclat79 Registered Member

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    Gparted or a System Rescue Live CD can also be used to reformat the partition on the Sandisk. Format vfat32 works well between Linux and Windows for a usb device.

    -- Tom
     
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