Routers: new versus used

Discussion in 'polls' started by Andz, Aug 10, 2015.

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For security reasons, is it usually worth the premium to buy a new router versus a used one?

  1. Yes

    71.4%
  2. No

    28.6%
  1. Andz

    Andz Registered Member

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    The question was inspired by this article that really got me thinking about routers:
    "Download and install the latest firmware. Ideally, do this before connecting the device to the Internet."​
    The article highlights the Asus RT-AC87U as an example:
    "Also, any router your ISP provides is going to be about as crappy and "recent" as the awful stereo system you get in a new car. So I say stick with well known consumer brands. There are some hardcore folks who think all consumer routers are trash, so YMMV.
    "I can recommend the Asus RT-AC87U – it did very well in the SmallNetBuilder tests, Asus is a respectable brand, it's been out a year, and for most people, this is probably an upgrade over what you currently have without being totally bleeding edge overkill. I know it is an upgrade for me."​
     
  2. ArchiveX

    ArchiveX Registered Member

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    Buy a brand NEW Router.
     
  3. luciddream

    luciddream Registered Member

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    I like my Netgear r6300v2 routers very much. Even the factory firmware is very nice... has the features a $500 router would have in about a $130 router if I recall. And takes very well to flashing with dd-wrt. I flashed both of mine with the latest build and they work great. Just make sure to do a reset first, then after that turn it on and then off again as well. Great bang for your buck routers IMO.

    And yeah, always buy them new... unless you have the money to burn and aren't comfortable flashing the routers yourself.
     
  4. MisterB

    MisterB Registered Member

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    I buy used Linksys routers that can be flashed with Tomato and DD-WRT. No activation fees for DD-WRT like some new routers. I've used one for almost 5 years with no problems or breaches. If I ever get more bandwidth, I will have to upgrade to a faster router but I still might use the WRT54Gs for subnets and VPN tunnels. I see no need to buy new ones for security reasons if they can be flashed with new firmware.
     
  5. WildByDesign

    WildByDesign Registered Member

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    I am very well versed in flashing firmware and have been a passionate OpenWrt user for a few years now. I have no problems with going to thrift stores and picking up OpenWrt compatible routers, factory reset, and flashing latest firmwares. For everyday users, I would stick with brand new equipment. But for those who like to tinker with their hardware, I'm all for buying used stuff.
     
  6. jadinolf

    jadinolf Registered Member

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    If you buy it from a friend- go ahead.

    From on eBayer or a company- beware.:(
     
  7. amarildojr

    amarildojr Registered Member

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    In any case, you must be able to upload a new firmware with your firewall rules. It doesn't matter if it's new or old, if you can't see the source code you're screwed either way.
     
  8. MisterB

    MisterB Registered Member

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    That's really it, it's the firmware that matters, not the router.

    But hardware does matter in this too. You have to know that the hardware is capable of a clean flash and that you have complete access to the flash memory. That is another reason I like the older Linksys/Cisco gear. It's also very reliable. Outages are not fun, whether due to your ISP or your own setup.
     
  9. taleblou

    taleblou Registered Member

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    I think ASUS is all hypes and bullcrap. Based on the popularity of ASUS, I got a new ASUS pc and soon after a month, the dvd drive is screwed. It seems my brand new ASUS pc has issue with dvd burning and drives. By far its the first pc I ever got that had a issue like this. called their support and they asked for the whole pc to be send in for repair instead of the crappy part.

    Anyway I think ASUS is over-rated and I no-longer like the brand.
     
  10. xxJackxx

    xxJackxx Registered Member

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    I would only buy used if I knew where it came from. Even then I would hesitate. They seem to deteriorate with heat and time.
     
  11. luciddream

    luciddream Registered Member

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    Agreed Jack, but I must concur with MisterB that those Linksys WRT54G's were the shizzle back in the day... belong in the hall of fame of routers. Best compatibility and useability with 3'rd party firmware of any router ever created. I still have two of them too. But this Netgear r6300v2 can get more out of the firmware I use, handles the extra bandwidth I have... it screams, both wired and wirelessly with it's dual band, 1300 + 450 Mbps. Stronger encryption. Plus I needed one that was Wireless AC 1750 to work with the Dell Precision I recently picked up. And have two Inspiron 530's hardwired into it.

    It really seems like a great router to me, handles 3'rd party firmware great... nice list of compatibility already in it's brief existance. I think it too will eventually be considered as one of those go-to routers for dd-wrt and the likes.

    And my modem seems to have a way of stopping ISP's from throttling bandwidth. It's a great combination, it and my router. It's a Motorola Arris Surfboard Modem - 600 Series - Model SB6183. The white ones, not the black, as they have newer firmware. The black ones are like the ones you get rented to you from ISP's and generally have older firmware. If you look at the comments at Amazon you'll see my sentiments echoed... about people getting more bandwidth than they're supposed to be able to get based on their plan. I'm getting as much as 150 Mbps down now, and only paying for the cheapest plan from Comcast.
     
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