Router Process?

Discussion in 'hardware' started by Coolio10, Oct 8, 2011.

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  1. Coolio10

    Coolio10 Registered Member

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    Is there a standard procedure that routers (home/residential) go through when you first plug them in such as assigning i.p. addresses etc..?

    Is there any website/manual that lists the steps it takes to boot?
     
  2. Cudni

    Cudni Global Moderator

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    any particular router? I guess it would be part of the firmware routine; boot to custom os go to whatever precoded ip address etc etc
     
  3. Coolio10

    Coolio10 Registered Member

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    Not a specific router, just what any router would do to perform its basic function. Probably shouldn't have used the word "boot". I don't mean any command line stuff, just general steps.
     
  4. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Boot is fine. There is certainly a microprocessor (or two) in a router and when it is powered on, it boots - loads an OS and program.

    There are only two connections to all routers and a router serves one purpose, to connect/isolate two networks: typically the Internet and your network (everything on your side of the router).

    However, most routers are integrated devices that also have on the same mainboard, a 4-port Ethernet switch. These are separate network devices that just happen to be in the same box, sharing the same power supply. There is NO SUCH THING as a "wireless router"! That is a marketing term only. A so-called "wireless router" is just another integrated device that has on the same mainboard, the router, typically a 4-port Ethernet switch, and a WAP - wireless access point. Actually, it's a 5-port switch and the WAP is connected internally to the router via the 5th port - and the WAP typically receives an IP via static (coded in firmware) IP assignment.

    By default, most, if not all routers designed for home use will try to connect to a network or "gateway device" (typically the Cable/DSL modem) when "booted" to obtain an IP. It does not "assign an IP" at this point, it "assumes" the IP assigned to the modem by the ISP.

    Also by default, most routers are configured for DHCP - dynamic IP assignment. So when connected devices (computers, networked printers, etc.) announce their presence, they will then receive an IP assignment from the router (either via an Ethernet connection, or through the WAP). The router does not seek out connected devices, they have to announce their presence first.

    These are all industry standard protocols. That is why and how you can connect a Windows PC, a Mac, and HP printer, and network storage device to the same router and communications is established - regardless who makes the router.

    Clear as mud?
     
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