restoring to new drive: will I have problems matching to motherboard?

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by ginahoy, Feb 26, 2006.

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  1. ginahoy

    ginahoy Registered Member

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    Last year I had to replace my mobo and was advised in two different forums that the OEM version of WinME won't boot unless I installed an identical mobo from same mfr (Dell Dimension 4100). Fortunately Overstock.com had good deal on exact Dell board and the replacement worked out of the box.

    Now my hard drive is making some intermittant clicking noises and I want to replace it before it dies. I routinely backup my drive image to an 80gb WD external hd (I use AI 9.0).

    Although restoring a drive image *should* work just fine, I guess I'm a bit paranoid since I've never done this before and want to make sure I won't run into problems restoring the OS image to another hard drive. Can someone confirm before I purchase the replacement drive?

    Thanks!
    David

    PS: I don't have any partitions on my original drive, and will probably replace it with same model drive (WD400BB).
     
  2. glcinc

    glcinc Registered Member

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    I know XP pro works just fine even with different MBs it just prompts for drivers if necessary. I don't know about ME. I've done dozens of ASUS MBs that were different models using the same image and it worked perfectly every time.
     
  3. ginahoy

    ginahoy Registered Member

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    Thx for the response, but just to clarify, my question has nothing to do with swapping out mb's. I only brought that up to explain my concern. If I knew exactly what binds my OEM OS to the Dell MB, I could probably ask my question in a more intelligent way. What I'm trying to figure out is whether this binding, whatever it is, might somehow be broken when I restore the image to a new drive. If the image is literally identical to the old drive, then everything should be fine. But that is the question, isn't it?
    David
     
  4. Firecat

    Firecat Registered Member

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    The OEM OS may be bound to the motherboard by different factors:

    1)Dell may or may not have tied the BIOS together with product activation
    2)Some other identifier, perhaps the chipset or something like that.

    Anyway, Microsoft licensing does not allow you to use an OEM OS on another motherboard than the one you purchased the OS with. Due to this, you can have some problems:

    1) Windows may ask for reactivation
    2) Windows may only boot in safe mode due to incompatible drivers.

    In case of reactivation, if Internet activation does not work, then you will need to telephone Microsoft and tell them that you replaced your motherboard due to some problem blah blah :D
     
  5. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

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    ginahoy,

    That's what images are for. Restoring. You will be fine. Buy the largest HD your system can handle. You don't need to use an identical brand or size HD.

    You can either use the clone or image technique, preferably clone for upgrading to a new HD.
     
  6. Menorcaman

    Menorcaman Retired Moderator

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    Hi Firecat,

    According to ginahoy's first post he uses Windows Me, which as far as I'm aware isn't subject to Microsoft activation ;).

    Regards
     
  7. ginahoy

    ginahoy Registered Member

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    Again, I'm not changing MB's, so this part of the discussion is academic, at least in my case.

    Thanks Brian for answering my question. Since my old drive is still working fine, I will take your advice and use the clone method. I assume that means that I will install the new drive along side my old drive. But when I install the new drive, it's going to be assigned "G" or higher, depending on what's plugged it at the time. This raises another question: Once I do the clone, what will I need to do when I pull out the old drive so that the new drive will become C and function as boot drive? Or is this process fully transparent when using the Clone feature?
    David
     
  8. noonie

    noonie Registered Member

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    First of all, you should have no problems whatsoever, with a new pata hdrive. If your os works now it will work with the new drive and as mentioned there is no activation.

    Legally, you also don't have problems with oem, because your motherboard was a direct Dell brand replacement.

    Since you have a large external drive, for safety's sake I would
    1 Create an image of the complete 40gig os drive using Ti and aim the save to your external
    2 Manually copy data only in its native format to the external, just to have another copy.
    3 When you get your new drive, install it as a slave and clone to it, but be sure you do not let the computer reboot with both drives. This will prevent your driveletters from possibly being reassigned. Then put your newly cloned drive as Master on channel0 and you're good to go.

    This gives you 2 other backups, if the clone fails.

    As far as your hdrive goes, you probably will not be able to find the WD400BB drive, it is probably too old, but you can search for that or a JB model that has 8mb cache.
    If you are in the US look here http://www.circuitcity.com/ccd/Search.do?c=1&context=&keyword=st3160023ark&searchSection=All&go.x=12&go.y=8 at this drive. It is a great price and Seagate offers a 5 yr warranty. I switched to them recently from WD.

    Windows ME will not see the full 160gig, but that does not matter, it wouldn't work any differently and if you upgrade to XP later then you can increase the partition size to it's full capacity.

    The clicking you hear is not good, sometimes that drive will last hours, sometimes weeks, but be ready. Do a complete image NOW, even if you have no new drive.

    Good luck
     
  9. goodsurf99

    goodsurf99 Registered Member

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    Put your new drive in as the slave and jumper the old drive as the master unless both drives are set to the CS mode in which the position on the cable determines master/slave. Boot from the BOOT CD. Now you are ready to do the CLONE. Since you are using a small drive (WD40BB is now a small drive) just stick with one partition.

    Now comes the IMPORTANT step. Remove you OLD drive from IDE and power. You can leave it in the box. Rejumper the NEW drive as stand-alone (for WD this means remove the jumper). Master salve jumper settings are only used when there are two drives on the same IDE channel. Now boot from the hard drive. If all is well, Windows will see the boot partiton of the NEW drive, boot up OK, and call it the "C" drive with a funny name like DRV1_PART1. You can change the name from the properties menu. If it does not boot, there are many reasons why and best of luck trying to figure out what it is. Just be glad your old drive is still there. Needless to say, copy are your CRITICAL data somewhere else before you do anything like this... ALWAYS!!!!
     
  10. ginahoy

    ginahoy Registered Member

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    Ok. Now I have two great inputs, each with different strategies. Thanks to you guys, I fully understand and can take it from here. I can't remember if I use cable select (CS) or jumper, but I have the WD jumper diagram in my file. I have to remove another small hd first (420 MB), as my zip drive and cd rom take up the other IDE channel. I'm no longer using it anyway as I long along copied everything of interest to my "big" 40g drive.

    As for getting a larger drive, my full image is just over 8 GB, so I hardly think I'm ready for that. A BNIB WD400BB (mfr date 9/05) sold for $33 last night on eBay... just missed it. Used 400BB's with guarantees from reputable sellers go for about $10 less. I *could* pop $60 for the 8MB JB, but my 866Mhz system is not worth investing any more than I have to, as I imagine I'll be dragged kicking and screaming into a new XP system within the year (I really HATE changing OS's!!! I stuck with Win3.1 until 2000!). Finally, unless I build my next system myself, I wouldn't really save any money by porting new hd to my next system.

    Noonie: I couldn't help but to smile when I read your list of suggestions! I bought the external hard drive and AI 9 as soon as I started hearing the noises last month (something I should have done long time ago). Since then, I do daily full image backup of my old hd pointed to external drive (only takes 6 minutes) and full surface scans every week (I'm up to 12 or 15 bad sectors now). I even have my critical data backed up on the external drive (as well as to a thumbdrive) in native format. I finally realized I just need to replace the drive and move on. But the backup habit is here to stay.

    David
     
  11. noonie

    noonie Registered Member

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    Perhaps that link didn't work for you.

    But the 160gig is $39.00. More importantly, it has a 5 year warranty. The size is irrellavent.

    I get a lot from ebaty too.
    I would hate to see you be penny wise and....

    As always do what is best for you.
     
  12. ginahoy

    ginahoy Registered Member

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    The link works fine... I just didn't click on it (who would'a thunk a 160gb with 8mb ram for $40). Maybe I'll build my next system after all :))

    thanks
    D
     
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