Restore only one partition?

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by hanker, Dec 23, 2008.

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  1. hanker

    hanker Registered Member

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    I use ATI Home newest version. How can I restore only bootable C partition without delete all other partitions? I can take bakup noe many different media like USB stick, DVD and so on, but only restore is problems..

    Erkki
     
  2. jonyjoe81

    jonyjoe81 Registered Member

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    just do an image backup of "my computer" and choose to backup your c: partition, when you restore just put a checkmark on that partition and you will restore it.

    I do it all the time and have restored the c: partition on my 3 partition hard drive, without it affecting or damaging the other partitions. I disable windows "system restore" on my computer and just rely on true image to "restore" my c: partition if I have problems.

    Don't do any clones, that will overwrite all the partitions when restored.
     
  3. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    Hanker,

    In addition to the backups you mention, I hope you are including a disk option backup which includes everything on the disk. A backup of this type includes all partitions and all data and is achieved by checking the disk option as illustrated by the image below. Checking the disk option causes all partitions also to be checked.

    The reason a "disk" image backup is so valuable is that you can very easily create a new disk replacement but have the added benefits of performing a single partition restore if that is all that is needed--such as when a virus or hardware issue should occur.

    Just because I advocate performing a full backup of the entire disk first & occasionally, this should not be interpreted that every backup has to include all partitions. My concern is that of a disk failure and your quick ability to recover. A disk backup provides that capability very easily. You can still do single partition backups but always maintain a full disk backup which is reasonably current.

    Clone or Restore using Resize comparison
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  4. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

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    Grover,

    I know I'm the odd man out here but I've never created a full disk image backup. I image my OS partition(s) and my games partition (games and large programs installed here). The data partition(s) comprising the majority of used space on my HD is backed up in native format using a data backup program.

    Personal preference of course but it suits my needs. I've had a few HD failures and restoring to an empty HD is straight forward.
     
  5. dwalby

    dwalby Registered Member

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    I agree with Brian, data partitions are easily backed up, heck even copied directly with an OS command. I haven't tried it lately, but I seem to recall doing a simple OS copy to an external USB HD was faster than using Acronis to do an image of my data partition. But just for consistency I still do an occasional image of the data partition using Acronis.

    I think what Grover was really trying to say was make sure you back up all of your partitions at least once, which is what the full disk image would force you to do. Then you won't regret it later if something weird happens, so I agree with that sentiment completely.

    If you set things up to periodically image all the partitions at various intervals then the full disk backup isn't really necessary.
     
  6. DwnNdrty

    DwnNdrty Registered Member

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    It's always good to have some kind of redundancy plan so a full disk backup as well as a data backup is not a bad idea especially as large hard drives are so cheap nowadays.
     
  7. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

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    I usually have one just in case I really, really need it and it is always out of date but it does have the partition structure.

    I'm not changing HDs very often and I have more than one machine so speed isn't much of an issue either. My C drive is the only one I image and I use SyncBack to backup files in their native format.

    If I get a new HD, I just partition the C drive portion I want with an XP setup disk or any other partitioning program. I then restore my C drive image and I'm off and running. I then setup the data partitions using Windows Disk Management and Windows copy the data files into them. This makes changing partition layout and sizes very easy. A handy thing for doing this is to have a screen print of your Disk Management screen so you have all the data at hand when you setup the new one - you can see which partitions would benefit from a size adjustment.

    A benefit of the above, if you want to call it that, is that you can do the full format of each partition. It takes more time than a quick but it will give you some confidence your new drive is in good shape.
     
  8. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    Hi Brian and all,
    Thank you and seekforever for posting the methods you use. Windows provides many ways of achieving the same final result. I am not suggesting a "one size fits all" approach.

    Most of my postings relates to the person that is looking for guidance and needs a little help to reduce the chances of getting into trouble. I believe the approach used depends a great deal on the skill of the individual person. Some have a enough skill they can get themselves out of trouble should a problem arise. Others that are just learniing want a more detailed step by step approach.

    I certainly would concur that other approaches are successful. In fact, it is posters such as yourself and other that have helped me develop my skills into what few they are now. Much of what I learn is from reading the various postings and practicing. Once a person is successful with their approach, then they can add other methods. To some, too many options is confusing. My postings try to point to the prevention of problems.

    Merry Christmas to all.
    Grover

    Merry Christmas.
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2008
  9. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

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    Groverh, I agree, and you are to be congratulated for your very helpful and needed guides. The amount I have learned from reading this forum, not only for TI specifics but for general OS and PC info, is monumental.

    Hopefully, those who can and want to take advantage of other methods will find all postings helpful in making their decision without adding to the confusion factor. One reason we can post an alternative without being overly concerned about confusion is that your guides are there to provide the step-by-step instruction for those who just want to get the job done with TI.

    Merry Christmas to you and all others on the forum.
     
  10. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

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    seekforever,

    It's uncanny how we do image/restore in such a similar way.

    One refinement I use in my test computer is to restore the partition structure from a First Track backup (I use BING and MBRWork). The test computer has about 20 partitions, mostly Primary, courtesy of BING. I can install a new blank HD, restore the partition structure with labels etc, and it only takes a few seconds. The partitions are empty of course.
     
  11. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

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    Grover, they certainly do. I hope beginners don't try to follow what some of us do.

    Merry Xmas.
     
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