Resize Windows partition to dual boot Linux

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by interesteduser, May 6, 2005.

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  1. Is there any way I can resize the NTFS WinXP partition on my laptop to take up just 10Gb instead of the full 40Gb?

    I want to dual boot Linux without re-installing my nicely-setup Windows.

    If TI8 can't do it, can any other products - MigrateEasy or Partition Magic or something?

    This will be using Fedora Core 3 with the new ext3fs extensions.
     
  2. orthocross

    orthocross Registered Member

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    It is not possible to resize partitions using Microsoft-supplied tools.
    However, it is possible using third-party tools.

    There is Symantec's Partition Magic 8. It is a full-featured disk utility, enabling you to resize, create, delete, and format partitions with several file systems, including NTFS. There is a trial version available on Symantec's website. However, this trial version has it's teeth taken out, and it is not possible to save any changes you might want to make using it.

    There is also BootITNG. It is also a full-featured disk utility, enabling you to resize, create, delete, and format partitions with several file systems, including NTFS. There is a trial version on their website. Unlike Partition Magic, the trial version is fully functional for the length of the trial period. Not only this, but BootITNG is much cheaper than Partition Magic if you decide to purchase it.

    As to the size of your proposed partitions, I do not advise a Windows system partition of less than 20 gig when dualbooting with Linux. But, of course, if you do decide to purchase a partitioning utility, you would be able to resize your partitions at any time. However, every change made to partitions on your HD increases your chances of incurring data corruption, so you must take that into account when resizing partitions.

    If you intend to share files between LInux and Windows, it is a good idea to create at least one FAT32 partition to keep the common files on, since Linux has no problems with writing to FAT32 partitions, but has problems with writing to NTFS volumes.
     
  3. MiniMax

    MiniMax Registered Member

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  4. thanks for the replies, i've actually managed it now with the free tools ntfsresize and fdisk (on a linux rescue cd).
     
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