Replacing Powersupply

Discussion in 'hardware' started by Coolio10, Jan 30, 2010.

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  1. Coolio10

    Coolio10 Registered Member

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    I have two computers, one is really old, while one is pretty decent. The power supply of the decent one is making clicking noises and refuses to turn on, so i assume its dead. The old one still works fine, but its really slow, so i was wondering if i could swap the power supplies. I am not sure if they would be compatible, but if they aren't, will any damage be done? So i hoped to just plug it in and see if it would actually work. The watts are definitely different (100 difference) but if i disconnect some unneeded parts, will it be fine?

    Another problem would be the case. The powersupply that works will not fit inside the case, so is it fine for it to hang out?
     
  2. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    We would need more information. You say it does not fit the case - that is not good. The vast majority of cases, motherboards, and PSUs all conform to the ATX form factor standard just so they can be used with each other. So the fact yours does not fit means it is not a standard PSU, or the case is not standard. We would need specific brands and model numbers. If the case is a microATX case and the PSU is a standard ATX, then electrically, you can use it. But if the PSU is an old style AT PSU, then it will not work.
     
  3. YeOldeStonecat

    YeOldeStonecat Registered Member

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    Highly unlikely, I wouldn't try it. Newer computers with newer CPUs, the motherboards have the 4 or 6 pin 12 volt adapters for the CPU socket...which older style power supplies do not have. Also new computers with midrange or higher graphics cards have specific minimal amps at the rail requirements, which older power supplies cannot provide.
     
  4. Coolio10

    Coolio10 Registered Member

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    It has integrated graphics. The main connection into the motherboard seems the same on each computer. The old supply might fit, but it would be a squeeze. And when i said decent computer, i still meant old. It's just that one is a bit newer than the other.
     
  5. ronjor

    ronjor Global Moderator

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    How old is old? :)
     
  6. Coolio10

    Coolio10 Registered Member

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    Umm, the decent one i purchased in 2005-2006. I got the other one a short time before that, but it was a cheap custom made one my cable guy sold me :cautious: , so i don't really know how old it is. I do know it had less memory and a slower processor though.
     
  7. Seer

    Seer Registered Member

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    If it's the same, then it will work. I have an AMD dual-core (2007) that works in an old case (400W PSU) from circa 2000-2001.

    You mean the 12V ESP connector? Aren't these used for Intel Core2Duos only? My abovementioned AMD does not use that...

    What do you mean "hang out"? With an open case? That will certainly affect the cooling of your case, but is not a big deal if you don't run this PC 24/7. It sure looks ugly though.
     
  8. wat0114

    wat0114 Guest

    Get yourself a can of compressed air and blast the daylights out the supply's innards.

    My story is here. It's worth a try :)
     
  9. Coolio10

    Coolio10 Registered Member

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    Will a vacuum work? One thing i noticed is that if i unplug the main power connection to the motherboard and plug it back in, the fan starts spinning for 1 second, then shuts off. Does this mean it still works, but something is messing with it?
     
  10. wat0114

    wat0114 Guest

    A vacuum could work. At least it won't cost anything. The brief spinning of the fan after main power restore is fairly typical, I think.
     
  11. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Be very careful with a vacuum. Here's an extract from my canned text on cleaning a PC.

    With care you can use a vacuum cleaner and a soft paint brush. But it must be remembered that air and dust particles zipping past and banging into the nozzle of the vacuum will generate lots of static electricity in the nozzle, especially plastic nozzles. This static can then discharge through ESD sensitive devices on the motherboard, destroying them. So using a vacuum does raise VERY SERIOUS and legitimate concerns. But so does heat! And using some sort of forced air is best at removing heat trapping dust So if compressed air is not available, vacuuming is the next best thing.

    Because of this static, it is absolutely essential ESD precautions are observed to prevent static buildup and damage from ESD, as well as physical damage from banging the nozzle into fragile devices, or scratching the motherboard. But the process is simple. With the computer powered down and unplugged, and with a soft brush in one hand and the vacuum nozzle in the other, extend a finger on your nozzle holding hand out past the tip of the nozzle and plant that finger on bare metal of the case. Then simply use the brush to sweep the dust into the vacuum. With your finger(s) touching metal, and your hand wrapped around the nozzle, no static can build up, no ESD damage can occur. Every time you reposition the nozzle, touch metal with an extended finger before moving in close. ​
     
  12. YeOldeStonecat

    YeOldeStonecat Registered Member

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    They started coming out with earlier Pentium 4's..back in the HyperThread Northwood days, perhaps earlier. My Asus P4C800 with a Northwood 3.0 H/T on it has one from the Antec 600 watter to the motherboard.
     
  13. YanK33

    YanK33 Registered Member

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    Dont use old used parts, you may have the same problem in a couple of months. I suggest you to save some money and get an descent 650w PSU they are cheap this days and you can get a modular one with fan control for maybe $90
     
  14. wat0114

    wat0114 Guest

    Well, mine packed it in last night. Odd, because it was running fine and cool after dusting it last week, but it refuses to even turn on. Removing the cover (it's out of warranty) confirmed my suspicions. One resistor is fried, chared pc board under it, and a few of the electrolytic caps are oozing a rusty colored chemical. Anyway, I've decided to break the bank and replace the 650W unit with a beast :) Sometimes cheap isn't the best way to go, and I believe this is especially true with a pc psu. This unit puts out 850W, it's high efficiency (so less heat generated), its modular with flat cables and comes with a 7 year warranty. It can easily be transfered to my next pc, probably a couple years down the road.

    So coolio, maybe remove the cover on the supply and check the inside. You may see evidence of failure, and if and when you buy a replacement, think about going a bit overkill if you can afford it.
     
  15. linuxforall

    linuxforall Registered Member

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    For PSU, its always good to go over and spend a little cash for higher rated one, the big ones run at half their capacity and run cooler and last longer. Of course keeping them clean is quintessential. You are usually safe with makers like Antec, Enermax, Zalman, Coolermaster etc.
     
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