replacing a case fan

Discussion in 'hardware' started by Salamander, Oct 16, 2011.

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  1. Salamander

    Salamander Registered Member

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    I'm looking to replace a Zalman RDH8025B1 fan (I don't know the specs)that is inside the HD cage of one of my desktops. I'm looking for something that cools as well, but is a bit quieter. ANy suggestions?
     
  2. cozumel

    cozumel Registered Member

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    Hi,

    According to Zalman that fan 80x80mm outputs 34.0 dB at normal (full) speed.

    Here is a list of 80x80mm fans sold. Personally, I like the Scythe. The noise and airflow specs are given for all the fans.

    Alternatively, buy a zalman fan mate to reduce the speed and noise of your current fan.

    Or you could use a fan conroller.
     
  3. cruelsister

    cruelsister Registered Member

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  4. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    I would inspect the case and see if it will a support larger (120mm) fan. Larger fans move massive amounts of air but typically at a significantly lower RPM, and that results in much quieter operation.

    There are many good fan makers - Antec, Vantec, Panaflo are more good ones. The key is to look for precision ball or fluid bearings. Look at the specs. If the bearing type and db level are not listed, I would avoid that fan. Blade width and pitch (in addition to RPM) determine how much air (CFM) a fan moves, as well as noise levels. Therefore, you cannot go by db (noise level) alone to determine quality. Some makers tout low noise, but a look a the specs reveals they do it by slowing down the fan, reducing the CFM, which limits its cooling capability.

    If your case does not support a larger fan in front, look at the rear fan support. If you can add a second fan in the back, it will pull more air in through the front vents. If you are not running 10K drives, and you don't have several drives stacked on top of each other, the extra rear fan should provide adequate cooling for the drives and eliminate any fan noise from the front - which is often pronounced being closer to the user's ears.
     
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