Removing junk from a new computer

Discussion in 'other software & services' started by JerryM, Sep 18, 2010.

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  1. JerryM

    JerryM Registered Member

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    Kim Komando recommended this.
    www.pcdecrapifier.com

    Anyone know anything about it? I am going to get a new laptop in a couple or three months. My Toshiba came with a ton of junk, and I did not know what to remove.

    Thanks,
    Jerry
     
  2. mrgigabyte

    mrgigabyte Registered Member

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    i use revo uninstaller to get rid of the software i did not want on my new machine its just common sense on what to remove and if you are not sure on something just ask on forum they have always help me when i need help :cool:
     
  3. JerryM

    JerryM Registered Member

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    Thanks.
    Jerry
     
  4. wtsinnc

    wtsinnc Registered Member

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    Hello JerryM;

    Manufacturers count on the revenue from installing antivirus and multimedia applications so unless you can find a laptop that has no 3rd party software already installed (pretty much an impossibility), the only way you will get what amounts to a clean install is to wipe the drive, install the OS yourself, then add only those additional applications you want.

    No matter what uninstaller(s) you use, you will NEVER completely remove all of the registry keys/DLLs associated with those applications you eliminate, so either decide to live with (those) remainders or do a clean install using the recovery media on DVD that should be supplied with your new computer.

    If you do reinstall from the recovery media, be sure to have on hand any necessary drivers and "must have" applications unless you are absolutely certain they are already in the recovery disc.
    -Also-
    Provided your new computer has a recovery partition on the hard drive, image that partition so that you can revert the machine to it's original state in case the new install doesn't meet your needs or expectations or you need to return the computer for a refund or exchange.
     
  5. JerryM

    JerryM Registered Member

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    Thanks for the info and advice. If I have to go through all that I'll just live with it. I have done that with my Toshiba.

    However, the newsletter from Kim Komando indicates that the aforementioned program will remove at least most stuff. I was hoping that someone had used it.
    http://www.komando.com/downloads/category.aspx?id=3930

    Regards,
    Jerry
     
  6. JRViejo

    JRViejo Global Moderator

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    JerryM, I have used PC Decrapifier in the past and it works as advertised. Very simple to use.

    Here's the Application List (click on each link for more info) of items the program can remove and How It Works. Read their FAQs as well.
     
  7. JerryM

    JerryM Registered Member

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    Thanks, JR.
    I'll study those references.
    I need it to be simple, and even if it removed half of the junk I would be ahead.

    Regards,
    Jerry
     
  8. Sully

    Sully Registered Member

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    I agree very much with what wtsinnc says.

    I have "cleaned up" many machines like you speak of, using many tools over the years. Nothing will give you the feeling of a fresh install of just the OS without the garbage. It is true you can live with a half-cleaned machine though.

    If it were me, I would take the time to learn what wtsinnc speaks of. Yes, it may be inconvenient and complicated at first. But, once you learn it, you will find you have more use of it that you ever thought.

    I don't care what anyone says, anywhere, any time. An OEM install with all the garbage they include will never, no matter how well you clean it, ever compare to a fresh install of a clean OS. If that sort of speed and problem free environment matter to you, then learn it. If you can live without it, then it is a moot point ;)

    Sul.
     
  9. mhf

    mhf Registered Member

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    Just came across slimcomputer, I haven't tried it so I can't comment on it - and anyway I don't have a new PC :)
     
  10. Peter2150

    Peter2150 Global Moderator

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    I bought my last laptop from www.powernotebooks.com they don't load the machine up with any crap, so you don't have to remove it.

    Same thing for desktops from Velocity Micro.

    Pete
     
  11. JerryM

    JerryM Registered Member

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    I believe what you say, Sully, but I am not going to go to that much trouble.

    Whatever the program leaves I can live with.

    Regards,
    Jerry
     
  12. andyman35

    andyman35 Registered Member

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    No argument from me whatsoever,give me a 'virgin' system every time ;)
     
  13. lodore

    lodore Registered Member

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    I always opt for a computer that comes with a windows disc.
    if you have a windows disc it doesnt matter how muych crap is on it. remember the crap installed means the computer is cheaper. I delete all the partitions and set it up how i like.
     
  14. chinook9

    chinook9 Registered Member

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    I used PCDecrapifier with my wife's HP laptop and I was very disappointed. It not only didn't remove much, it didn't even identify most of the crap that was on there. I use Revo Uninstaller and ZSoft Uninstaller on all my machines. I would recommend that when you get the machine, when it is brand new, get RevoUninstaller Portable (use aggressive registry clean if you're confident enough) and delete everything you don't want. After all the deletions, run it for a while to make sure you haven't screwed anything up.

    One of the toughest programs to delete was the trial version of Microsoft Office (which PCDecrapifier didn't even identify). It is a huge program and when I finally got the nerve to do the "Aggressive" registry clean there were over a thousand registry entries.

    One of the problems with my HP was that there is so much HP crap on it that doesn't show up as an application. I got rid of some of that but it was more difficult.

    Good Luck!
     
  15. Daveski17

    Daveski17 Registered Member

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    It's probably unavoidable with laptops, but my new desktop is being custom built. It will only have the software I want.
     
  16. Sully

    Sully Registered Member

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    Personally it really makes by blood boil when the OEMs do this. I hate working on them. I hate removing them. I hate using them. The people who buy them have no idea. It should be a crime IMO. I have yet to see one that is not affected by all the crap they install. The consumer should get a discount price for a sub-standard performing machine.

    It is becoming more difficult to get a source cd/dvd. They like to provide a recover image instead. There must be a price break for them from M$ to do that.

    I generally use my OEM key with my own install dvd. I modify it to my liking, to do what I want. If I have a beef with M$, it is that they are so resistant to allowing thier customers to have a unique experience. You have to know a considerable amount to make things happen the way you want.

    Sul.
     
  17. Kees1958

    Kees1958 Registered Member

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    Haha,

    Same here. The university laptop (Toshiba) for my Son: at least 1 hour cleaning all pre-installed crap.

    I bought him a Toshiba L500-1ZP because it has reasonable battery life (and he is travelling 4.5 hours a day to get to classes) and has a AtI HD 5165 video card (reasonable) with (only) a Intel 330M chip.

    His friends who where lucky to be selected (drafted) for a University nearby (only half an hour with public transport one way), bough all a MSI power house laptop (i7 4 core and fast gaming video card, with only 1 hour battery life).

    Here is something funny: His friends told them that their laptops ran much longer langer the test they had read. So they told my Son he made the wrong choice. Then they compared their Windows 7 marks and discovered that the Toshiba i3 scored better than their i7. Not only load those OEM's the laptop with crap, they also deliver the laptop crippled. Because the MSI does not has a strong battery, the safe BIOS settings are without CPU acceleration etc.
    So I earned 3 bottles of my preferred boose, for his friends to tweak their PC's (only Bios settings, plus list of programs to uninstall themselves with REVO).

    I also think it is a typical laptop thing. The discount actions with all this crap, at least saved us 100 Euro's. With any PC in the house I spend some time customising it, so in retropestive: I like the discount of a 100 bucks and accept the additional useless software. The one hour, which it took to remove, I had problably spend anyway on his PC.

    regards Kees
     
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