Publicly Revealing your PC's Protection Programs/Software/Tools and Strategies

Discussion in 'other security issues & news' started by RCGuy, Nov 23, 2007.

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  1. RCGuy

    RCGuy Registered Member

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    The quote above is from this thread:

    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=170399

    which this forum's software won't allow me to post in because it is considered too old, therefore, I decided to start this thread. I also wanted to note that the author of the above thread posted this thread:

    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=191233

    that ended up getting closed...if that has any bearing on anything. :doubt: However, the main purpose of this thread is to discuss a concern that has crossed my mind before and which the above quote has validated that concern. Therefore, what I would like to know is: Is it really wise to publicly reveal all of your computer's protection programs/software/tools and protection strategies?
     
  2. Chato

    Chato Registered Member

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    An interesting question...

    Speaking for myself, I dont care if the whole world knows my 'protection-toolkit'.
    I'm proud of, and I love the tools which I use for protecting my computer.
    I don't agree with that. I don't see any danger when a 'hacker' knows my protection-progs, without knowing the OS, my IP, hostname, open ports, active services, etc.
    Therefore, I would answer your question
    with:
    Don't worry about that, if:
    - you're not the sysadmin of a big company (that already is a potential victim),
    - You don't challenge the undernet with terms like "test my security and try to hack me".
    - you protect your computer with, at least some basic, security-progs.

    But that's only my humble opinion. I'm curious about the other's.
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2007
  3. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Hello,

    I'm blonde, 34, single mother. Wait, I'm 64, retired Chinese ...

    I use Spybot, I use BSD, I use Mac, I use Norton. Completely irrelevant.

    To begin the question by - the hacker x y z - is wrong. One should not try to think of what wrong someone else might try to do to him/her. One should focus on practicing best possible ... practices within reason and knowledge and ENJOY the internet. Yes, enjoy and worry a little less. Try to focus on the good and fun things.

    To believe someone online is tricky and can be misleading. I would not base my hacking thesis on someone's signature.

    Mrk
     
  4. BlueZannetti

    BlueZannetti Administrator

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    One question to ask yourself is how a random hacker out there will go about using that information? Assuming that it is up to date, assuming that it is correct, and assuming that it completely captures the status of the system. Assuming they know all those details about my system today, what then?

    Perhaps it's just me, but I don't understand the need to congest forum signatures with extensive statements of product usage, nor the ethic that maintains actually discussing specific security measures that one takes somehow actively comprises (it gets very vague beyond this...) those same measures.

    Blue
     
  5. MikeBCda

    MikeBCda Registered Member

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    In my own case, I'm simply following numerous suggestions here and at other support boards. I'm by no means "advertising" anything I use for security, but standard procedure when you're looking for help is to make sure that whoever you're asking knows what relevant is on your system so that you're talking a common language.

    Most importantly, the expert might well note (in your sig) software and/or system incompatibilities that are likely to be causing or at least contributing to your problem.

    As for hackers ... what the heck is the likelihood that you as a single home user will be personally targeted? (As opposed to widespread attacks by, e.g., bots.) Slim to none, I imagine.
     
  6. innerpeace

    innerpeace Registered Member

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    That's why I do it also. I'm lazy and if I need help, everything is right there in my sig. I even make it a little hard to read with the color. I am however proud of my programs but not because there are number #1, because they have proven stable on my machine.

    I'm no expert, but if you are hanging out where hackers do, it's like walking through a bad neighborhood. You should expect and prepare for bad things. I guess provoking a hacker is not a good idea either. At least that is what I have read. And finally, the easiest way for a person to hack you would be for you to install a new/strange/unknown program from an unknown source. Nothing in a sig. can protect you from yourself.
     
  7. chrisretusn

    chrisretusn Registered Member

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    I don't really think it makes a difference. I did have some info in my signature that identified my system for a while, but my environment is an ever changing one. I'd have to change my signature way to often. :)
     
  8. RCGuy

    RCGuy Registered Member

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    Thanks for all the feedback everyone.
     
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