Power Loss With Surge Protector

Discussion in 'hardware' started by CyberWorm, May 14, 2010.

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  1. CyberWorm

    CyberWorm Registered Member

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    I have a brand new Dell XPS 8100 which was delivered last week. So far I have experienced about 20 power losses to the computer. Dell insisted this was an issues with the motherboard or heatsink and have since been out to replace both parts. This did not resolve the issue.

    I think the issue is with surge protectors. When the computer is connected to a surge protector I experience random power losses. When the computer is connected directly into the wall, there are no power losses. The computer "experts" at PC World insist the surge protector make no difference to the power dispite there being a clear link between the two.

    I would just like to point out that I have tried many different surge protectors, and even have purchased a new one.

    Can anyone explain this?
     
  2. linuxforall

    linuxforall Registered Member

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    If you are experiencing power loss with surge protector then that simply means that the protectors are doing their job of clamping high voltage thats coming across your line, in that case I would suggest that you invest in a quality UPS from APC or others.
     
  3. westom

    westom Registered Member

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    Power loss as in all lights in the room go out? Or in the computer powers off while even the monitor power indicator light stays on?

    Did you execute Dell's comprehensive hardware diagnostics? Press F12 repeatedly before and when the Dell name first appears. In the resulting menu are diagnostics that test every subsystem comprehensively. Nothing that executed with Windows can do what a comprehensive hardware diagnostic does.

    Ignore all that nonsense about surge protectors. View its box. It lists a let-through voltage of 330 volts. That means the protector does nothing - remains 100% inert - until the 120 volts exceeds 300 volts. How often is that happening in your building? How often are you replacing clock radios, dimmer switches, and air conditioners because voltages exceed 300 volts? That number also says why some recommendations should be ignored - why a surge does not cause 'temporary' power cut off.

    Surges are voltages that exceed 300 volts. You are discussing a power off - voltages that drop to tens or less volts. Those numbers explain why to ignore those myths about surge protectors.

    How did Dell know the heat sinks are bad? Or did some tech working for Dell just blame the only thing he understood - heat? Heat is a diagnostic tool. All computers consider a room at 100 degrees F as an ideal room temperature. And heat is the best way to execute Dell's comprehensive hardware diagnostic.

    Hardware that is defective why still work in a 70 degree room. But then announce it is defective (to the diagnostic) when room temperatures are well above 90. We use heat to find defective hardware. We do not cure symptoms by 'more fans!' or other popular myths. Why did the tech blame heat?

    At some point immediately, someone should have measured power supply voltages with a 3.5 digit multimeter. Measure voltages without disconnecting anything. Those numbers will often exonerate or identify most suspects in about one minute. For example, a voltage can be defective - and the system will still boot and run. Then fail later - minutes or over a year later. A defect identified in one minute by a meter is consistent with your symptoms. Did anyone measure those four critical voltages with a meter?
     
  4. NoIos

    NoIos Registered Member

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    If you can...try using the pc with the surge protector and a UPS and see what happens. Alternatively try a brand new PSU or ask from Dell a new one.
     
  5. CyberWorm

    CyberWorm Registered Member

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    The new computer is randomly loosing power, everything else in the house is fine, including my other desktop PCs. The electric is very stable here and the lighting never dips.

    The Dell hardware diagnostics tool didn't bring up any errors or bad hardware, this is why Dell came to replace the motheboard and fan. Since then the computer has lost power twice, even without a surge protector. Having looked on the Dell forum, there are a number of other people with this particular model who are experiencing these power losses. No solution has yet been found.

    I do not intend buying a UPS for two reasons. One I can't afford one, and two I shouldn't have to buy one for my PC to work.

    I have a multimeter but I am not sure how to go using it as you described.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2010
  6. westom

    westom Registered Member

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    Connect the meter’s black probe to the chassis. With meter set to 20 VDC, the red probe will touch power supply wires where that cable connects to a 20 or 24 pin connector on motherboard. That connector has many red, orange, and yellow wires. And one purple, green and gray wire.

    Even with the computer off, push the probe into that nylon connector to touch the purple wire. It should measure about 5 volts. Power the computer on. Now any one orange, red, and yellow wires have 3.3, 5 and 12 volts.

    Setup for testing. A power supply must be loaded to expose its defect (which is why power supply testers are bogus). Access all peripherals simultaneously – multitask. IOW play complex graphics (ie a movie), while reading a CD-rom, while downloading from the internet, while playing sound loudly, while searching the entire hard drive for some text from only one file, while …. Now your supply has a maximum load. Measure voltage on each of four wires – purple, red, orange, and yellow. Report those numbers to learn what you have and to learn about things you may not even know existed.

    Meanwhile, very few items inside a computer can cause a shutdown. To better target another suspect (once the many components of a power supply ‘system’ are exonerated), better details on your power off are required. Detail what is happening before and when power is lost. And that includes the four diagnostic LEDs.

    Many techs have little computer knowledge. Blame only what they understand – ie heat. If your computer is an Intel processor, then heat will not shut it off. Too many want to cure heat rather than learn that heat is a diagnostic tool. To pass an A+ Certified Tech test, he needs no electrical knowledge. So many techs cannot understand how to find electrical problems – too often do not even know how to use the meter. They simply replace the "usual suspects" - also called shoutgunning.

    Windows also maintains a record of hardware problems that it works around. If necessary, use Windows Help to find system (event) logs. Windows records a hardware problem for future repair – while working around that problem. Another source of useful information.

    Once those power ‘system’ numbers are examined, then we can move on to other suspects or identify the problem. After getting those numbers, also view the system logs and detail what happens before and when power off happens.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2010
  7. linuxforall

    linuxforall Registered Member

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    This looks like a PSU issue, can you tell me what voltage hardware monitor is showing when system is loaded.
     
  8. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    If the power is clean to begin with, that is true. But this also assumes the surge protector is working properly and it does not sound like it is to me. Surges and spikes should not cause a power outage unless they are very excessive and then they should pop the S&S circuit breaker.

    That said, a surge and spike protector is little more than a fancy and expensive extension cord because they do nothing for low power events, like dips and sags, or extended high voltage events. EVERY time a high wattage device (such as refrigerators, coffee pots, toasters, air conditioners, microwaves, hair dryers, etc.) cycle on and off, they send surges and spikes, followed by sags and dips, down the line. S&S protectors can only deal with surges and spikes and do so in a shoddy manner. This then leaves the cleaning up and regulation to the PSU and motherboard regulator circuits which must work harder, thus generating more heat. While they are designed to do this for "normal" expected anomalies, heat increases aging and there's nothing saying that $20 hair dryer will not send something abnormal down the line next time it is used. So if you have any high wattage devices in your home or office, or you live in an apartment building, you should be on a good UPS with AVR (automatic voltage protection).

    This is not a good idea and every UPS manual I have seen advises against this practice! A S&S protector works by chopping or "clamping" off the tops of the sinewave in excess voltage events - that's the shoddy part and this can confuse the regulation circuits in an UPS as it can see that as "dirty" power - and it is dirty! The UPS should be connected directly to the wall. If you need more power connections than the UPS provides, use a plain extension cord, not one with S&S protection.

    One - can you afford a new computer? Or to lose all your data, which for many, is worth much more than the hardware? You don't have to spend $300 on a UPS, but you should avoid the budget models for they are not fast enough. The APC 800VA is a good choice, so is the CyberPower 1350 if you need a little more power. I run with an APC 1500VA UPS and it protects my Core i7 computer running 8Gb of RAM and power hungry GTX260 graphics card, AND all my network hardware (cable modem and wireless router and a Gb switch) AND my PDA, AND two 22" widescreen monitors! I could easily get by with a 1000VA UPS, but BestBuy had that 1500VA on sale and I could not pass it up.

    Two - You are absolutely right, you should not have to buy an UPS to get your computer to work! Something else is wrong and you need to determine what that is before you do cause irreparable damage to your computer, and/or corrupt your data. I suspect you have a bad S&S protector - one that is poorly made, of poor design, or has a manufacturing defect. For a test, try another S&S protector and if you still have problems, suspect your power supply.

    Everyone (homeowners, tenants, renters, dorm dwellers, computer owners) should also have a AC Outlet/Ground Fault Indicator Tester to make sure the wall outlets are properly wired, and grounded.

    Understand the primary advantage to using an UPS is the voltage regulation it provides and it does this by using the batteries to absorb the excess power in high-voltage event (which batteries do with ease) and by using the batteries to boost the voltage during dips, sags, and extended sags (brownouts).

    Notice I have not mentioned anything about power outages. That's because providing backup power during a complete power outage is just the icing on the cake! It's all about providing solid clean power to your sensitive, and expensive computer and networking equipment.

    The downside? The batteries need to be replaced about every 3 years, but that is something easily done by most users with a #2 Phillips screwdriver.

    BTW, if you have an expensive big screen TV or home theater audio system, they should be on a good UPS with AVR too.
    Then IMO, they are not techs, but wannabes. It took me two years of formal and on-the-job training in electronics theory and maintenance before I could call myself a technician. Anybody can assemble a computer. That does not make them a technician.

    Not sure what you mean about Intel CPUs, but note an overheated Intel CPU will shutdown to protect itself from damage - assuming the CPU is not otherwise faulty.

    I also do not recommend, and advise against non-technicians using multimeters to test PSUs. For one, most multimeters are incapable of testing for ripple or other anomalies. There is no "standard" for color coding wires. The ATX Form Factor standard only recommends and not all supply makers follow it. westom is correct, however that to properly test a PSU, it must be under proper load but that means to do it right, you must jam highly conductive, sharp metal probes into the heart of the motherboard where one slip can destroy the motherboard. Therefore, contrary the comments mentioned, swapping in a known good supply is an excellent method of troubleshooting PSUs, and a widely accepted practice among real technicians. In fact, connecting to a known good power source is often one of the first things we do when a problem might point to hardware. See my canned text below on testing PSUs below.

    ***

    To properly and conclusively test a power supply unit (PSU), it must be tested under various realistic "loads" then analyzed for excessive ripple and other anomalies. This is done by a qualified technician using an oscilloscope or power analyzer - sophisticated (and expensive) electronic test equipment requiring special training to operate, and a basic knowledge of electronics theory to understand the results. Therefore, conclusively testing a power supply is done in properly equipped electronic repair facilities.

    Fortunately, there are other options that are almost as good. I keep a FrozenCPU Ultimate PSU Tester in my tool bag when I am "in the field" and don't have a good spare power supply to swap in. While not a certain test, they are better than nothing. The advantage of this model is that it has an LCD readout of the voltage. With an actual voltage readout, you have a better chance of detecting a "failing" PSU, or one barely within specified ATX Form Factor Standard tolerances. Lesser models use LEDs to indicate the voltage is just within some "range". These are less informative, considerably cheaper, but still useful for detecting PSUs that have already "failed". Newegg has several testers to choose from. All these testers contain a "dummy load" to fool the PSU into thinking it is connected to a motherboard, and therefore allows the PSU to power on, if able, without being attached to a motherboard - great for testing fans, but again, it is not a true load or suitable for conclusive testing.

    Swapping in a known good supply is a tried and trued method of troubleshooting, used for years even by pros. If you have access to a suitably sized, spare power supply, carefully remove the suspect supply and replace it with a known good one and see if the problem goes away.

    I do not recommend using a multimeter to test power supplies. To do it properly, that is, under a realistic load, the voltages on all the pins must be measured while the PSU is attached to the motherboard and the computer powered on. This requires poking (with some considerable force) two hard and sharp, highly conductive meter probes into the main power connector, deep in the heart of the computer. One tiny slip can destroy the motherboard, and everything plugged into it. It is not worth the risk considering most multimeters, like plug-in testers, do not measure, or reveal any unwanted and potentially disruptive AC components to the DC voltages.

    Note the required voltage tolerance ranges:
    ATX PSU Voltage Tolerances.JPG

    And remember, anything that plugs into the wall can kill. Do not open the power supply's case unless you are a qualified electronics technician. There are NO user serviceable parts inside a power supply.
     
  9. CyberWorm

    CyberWorm Registered Member

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    Just to update the thread.

    The computer is now loosing power without the surge protector.

    According to the Dell Forum there are others who have experienced the same problem with this model. One user had the machine replaced which didn't solve the issue. He says that the only thing which worked was buying a "pure sine wave ups".
     
  10. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    The only way I would buy that is if the facility power (mains) was extremely dirty - not likely unless you live in some poor 3rd world country, or there was some other device putting all kinds of noise (dirt) on the line.
     
  11. CyberWorm

    CyberWorm Registered Member

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    I am wondering if the PSU is powerful enough to run everything? According to some other forums Dell installed a 350W into my model. What do you think?

    INTEL CORE I5 PROCESSOR (Intel: Maximum 73W)
    65W PROCESSOR HEATSINK (65W I Guess?)
    8192MB (2X2GB + 2x1GB) 1333MHZ DDR3
    1.2TB(2X640GB) SERIAL ATA
    16X DVD+/-RW DRIVE
    1GB NVIDIA GEFORCE GTX240 (Nvidia: Maximum 69W)
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2010
  12. westom

    westom Registered Member

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    That surge protector did nothing. Mentioning it means you did not grasp the point. Take that multimeter (that is also necessary to measure voltages for a useful reply). Measure conductivity between each plug prong and the same receptacle hole. Notice - only wire connects that plug prong to receptacle contact. There is nothing in between despite myths that say otherwise. Protector makes zero difference - is only a direct connection to AC mains - as the meter confirms. Others recommended that protector due to near zero electrical knowledge. The conductivity test demonstrates what others would not know - due to so much education from retail shelves. That protector is irrelevant.

    'Others have same symptoms' is useless information. Does not identify a fault. Too much hearsay. Says nothing that will solve your problem.

    A power supply must make much 'dirtiest' power irrelevant. For example, what is the output from a 120 volt UPS in battery backup mode? This one outputs two 200 volt square waves with a spike of up to 270 volts between those sine waves. Harmful to small electric motors and power strip protectors. Called a modified sine wave - a subjective term so that the electrically naive will feel UPS power is 'cleaner'.

    'Dirty' power is ideal perfect electricity to all computers because of what every computer power supply does. This assumes that supply was not selected by a computer assembler only on dollars and watts - a problem sometimes seen with custom built machines.

    For a useful answer, use the multimeter. Take measurements as defined earlier. Then a reply says what exists. No more "it could be this or tray that" - which are your only answers. For useful answers, that means numbers. Answers will only be as useful as numbers you must provide.

    When is power so dirty as to be harmful to small electric motors or power strip protectors? When output by a UPS in battery backup mode. Even that power was ideal for any computer because computer supplies were so robust even long before the IBM PC existed. Even that receptacle tester will report nothing useful.

    Your replies will only be as useful as information provided. Those with technical knowledge can post nothing useful from irrelevant observations - with no numbers.

    Is the power supply powerful enough? Those voltage numbers would be chock full of information - including an answer to that question.
     
  13. CyberWorm

    CyberWorm Registered Member

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    I will get the readings and report back.
    Hopefully nothing will go wrong.
     
  14. westom

    westom Registered Member

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    You could stick your tongue in there and not harm anything. The meter in 20 VDC cannot damage anything. What puts a comptuer at much higher risk? Disconnecting its power supply from the motherboard. Worry more about things that might actually cause damage. That is not the meter.
     
  15. CyberWorm

    CyberWorm Registered Member

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    There are many different wires some the same colour, so I assume any will do?

    Purple (PC Off) 4.94
    Purple 4.97
    Orange 3.32
    Red 5.09
    Yellow 11.97 - 11.94

    I don't know if this is anything to do with dirty power but I my ethernet runs through the electric line using one of these. Is it possible that one of these devices is causing noise on the line?
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2010
  16. westom

    westom Registered Member

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    I am sorry to say you have ideal perfect numbers (assuming these numbers were taken when the computer was multitasking to consume maximum power).

    Bill Bright posted a voltage chart. But those numbers do not tell the entire story. For example the 5 volts (purple and red wires) must exceed 4.87. 4.75 (from his chart) would define a complete failure.

    3.3 must measured above 3.23. 12 volts measures above 11.7. Your numbers are well above minimums. Well below maximums. And also report the supply is feeding a balanced load. Implies the supply has plenty of capacity for future peripherals.

    Now, if you can 'reproduce' the failure conditions, then again take those voltage measurements. But if the supply is properly designed, those numbers will vary little if any even before the failure occurs. Your numbers have sufficient safety margins.

    What about system (event) logs? And still not detailed is how power off occurs - see previous posts for the still unanswered questions.

    More information because numbers were provided and why details on power off must be included. Your computer has a power supply controller. Determines when power is permitted, when the CPU can execute, and when power is removed. Eventually, we will have to ask what might be telling the power supply controller to cut off power. Currently details of how power cuts off (what stays lit, what extinguishes, etc) have not been provided. So we cannot even discuss the power supply controller yet.

    Known - supply provides perfectly ideal power - well above what is necessary. If these numbers (again during maximum multitasking load) stay constant around the time that power suddenly cuts off, then the supply is completely exonerated.

    Notice how numbers result in a definitive answer. Move on to other suspects. Which is why those other questions needed answers.
     
  17. CyberWorm

    CyberWorm Registered Member

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    I am not sure I understand what you want me to do next. I don't think I can 'reproduce' the power failure because its totally random. Today the system hasn't gone off once, yesterday it went off several times.

    The Event Viewer shows these:
    Event 41, Kernel Power

    The system has rebooted without cleanly shutting down first. This error could be caused if the system stopped responding, crashed, or lost power unexpectedly.

    Log Name: System
    Source: Kernel-Power
    Event ID: 41
    Level: Critical
    User: SYSTEM
    Task Catagory: (63)
    Keywords: (2)


    Does that help ?
     
  18. ronjor

    ronjor Global Moderator

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    In my opinion, Dell should replace that computer if it is defective. If it is under warranty, it should repaired or replaced.
     
  19. westom

    westom Registered Member

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    So on another day when the system shuts off multiple times (and if failure was due to a voltage problem), then voltages measured anytime at that part of the day may identify a defect. IOW a failure at 2:45 and 3:37 means measured voltages might be defective maybe between 12:30 and 4:45. That is how failures work. The defective exists for long periods. Then failure only happens intermittently – what some assume to be random.

    That event log was important information. Is that the only error message? What were (if any) other system error messages before that one?

    Listed were many sentences with question marks. Every one needed an answer. Requested repeatedly were details on how power went off. For example what were four diagnostic LEDs maybe before and definitively after the system shut down?

    You did not say, yet how power went off. Did it power down. Just go blank? What were sounds before and after power off? What software was running before power off? These may be insignificant to you. But may be critical symptoms.

    What were room temperatures and humidity yesterday and today - when crashes were and were not happening. As noted earlier, heat is a diagnostic tool. Crashes never happen randomly. Only appear random because an always existing and undiscovered reason explains why it happens today and not tomorrow.

    Just to confirm, because the question was asked and not answered. Were voltages measured during maximum loading - multitasking to all peripherals simultaneously?

    Mentioned was a power supply controller. Mentioned only because what to do cannot be posted until all those other previous questions were answered.

    ronjor is quite right. Dell should fix or replace this. Why does anyone fix anything? To learn. Already you have learned something useful. If we trace the problem to something unique, then you know - without any doubt - when Dell has really solved it.

    Added to a list of questions (to move on after information from those previous questions are provided). What is connected to this Dell? Every wire no matter how insignificant it may be. A connected mouse may mean nothing to you. But can be a critical fact to others.

    Well the supply is all but fully exonerated. Does not explain power off. Those many other questions discuss maybe 10 other suspects.
     
  20. CyberWorm

    CyberWorm Registered Member

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    Today is going to be one of the "randomly loosing power" days. So far the system has been on for less than 2 minutes and I've already had 1 BSOD and a power loss.

    You did not say, yet how power went off. Did it power down. Just go blank?
    As windows started to load the desktop screen a BSOD appeared then the system rebooted. As the system was rebooting (windows logo screen), the computer lost power and went off. No sounds, no erros. This is the first BSOD I've seen on this machine, plus there is no minidump file. I don't think there is one specific application or task which is being performed when the system goes off. Its just like the power cable has been pulled out of the wall.

    What were (if any) other system error messages before that one?
    Until a few minutes ago, there are no errors, bsods, or warnings before the system goes off.

    What were room temperatures and humidity yesterday and today - when crashes were and were not happening.
    The room temp is always kept cool to slightly warm. The maximum temp has been 24C. As for humidity, I have not idea.

    That event log was important information. Is that the only error message?
    Last 5 entried before power loss
    File System Filter 'BHDrvx64' (6.1, ‎2010‎-‎04‎-‎24T00:37:13.000000000Z) has successfully loaded and registered with Filter Manager.
    File System Filter 'eeCtrl' (6.0, ‎2009‎-‎08‎-‎18T00:05:31.000000000Z) has successfully loaded and registered with Filter Manager.
    Symantec Antivirus minifilter successfully loaded.
    The system uptime is 29 seconds.
    The Event log service was started.

    For example what were four diagnostic LEDs maybe before and definitively after the system shut down?
    What LEDs are you talking about? The only LED the machine has is on the PSU.

    Just to confirm, because the question was asked and not answered. Were voltages measured during maximum loading - multitasking to all peripherals simultaneously?
    I will re-take those readings today under a heavier load.

    I agree with a replacement but not with the repair. They have had their chance to repair it and failed. If Dell keep guessing what the problem is, that means the computer is going back and forwards at my expense.

    What is connected to this Dell? Every wire no matter how insignificant it may be.
    Connected is 1 monitor, 1 usb mouse, 1 usb keyboard.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2010
  21. CyberWorm

    CyberWorm Registered Member

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    Update: When the computer looses power, the orange LED on the motherboard remains lit, the PSU grenn LED also remains lit.

    I have tried monitoring the voltage on the red montherboard power cable in hopes I could get some figures as the computer goes off. I sat for an hour monitoring the multimeter but the computer didn't lose power :mad:
     
  22. westom

    westom Registered Member

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    If you had a sudden power off without any warning, then any voltage measurements you took maybe one hour before and one hour afterwards are same as the numbers that happened during the crash.

    How much load (what was being accessed) when you took those numbers? For the power supply numbers to report something, you must be doing complex graphics, reading a CD-rom, accessing the internet, playing sound, etc (multitasking) when voltages were taken. Defects are apparent only during a heavy load.

    Is the room air conditioned. IOW is it humid outside with windows open? Or is the air dry because it is air conditioned? Or, in simpler terms, at any time do you feel a static electric discharge?

    Can you put the computer in a 30 degree F room? That will also provide useful facts. For example, only certain types of failures will be solid in 30 degrees, intermittent at 24 degrees, and non-existent in 18 degrees. And yes, one way used to find a problem was to first cool the entire computer in a refrigerator for two hours. Every computer should love both refrigerator and 40 degree C temperatures - never fail. If a computer fails at either temperature, then it is 100% defective - easier to solve or get replaced.

    That BSOD has numbers that will go a long way to zeroing in on the problem. BSOD suggests a new error message may now be in the event logs. Either this information will result in a solution or will make it virtually impossible for Dell to just replace parts on speculation.

    Your previous log entries are interesting - imply Windows sees a perfectly good computer hardware. So a problem may be in Windows (ie drivers). But we have not gotten there yet. (BTW, if you have anything on that machine you want to save or recover, now is the time to start doing or planning on doing that).

    Your Dell has a service tag number. What is it? That means we can see exactly what Dell put into your machine. And then the four diagnostic LEDs for your machine can be better located.

    Your Dell does not connect to a network cable? No printer? Obviously it connects to AC mains - was not listed. Do monitor and computer connect to a common power strip? Or separately to a 3 prong duplex wall receptacle (it is three prong)?

    As we move to exonerating more hardware, eventually a most unlikely suspect is considered. Dell provides a Recovery CD-Rom - maybe labeled System Restore. That literally erases everything on your disk; loads the system exactly as it was when you first got it. No reason to 'nuke n pave' the machine yet. But once we have eliminated all hardware suspects, then that will be the next step.

    The intent here is not so much to fix it as to make it definitely impossible for Dell to not fix or replace it. Secondary intent is to learn; to be a more 'computer literate' user. Failures are always a best way to 'learn from experience'.

    Stand back and view what you have. Previously, your power off sounded like the power supply controller was turning off the machine. The BSOD symptom would not be created by the power supply controller. That BSOD implies you have a defective subsystem OR that some software (or driver) on your hard drive is causing failures. Anything you can do to record numbers and text message from a BSOD will do a long way to isolating the failure to a specific part / component / subsystem/ software.

    It may appear no progress is occurring. Slowly the problem is being isolated to but a few parts.

    What can cause a BSOD? Very few items including video controller, sound card, CPU, memory, a few chips unique to the motherboard, software drivers, or power supply (which was looking ideal if the measurements were when peripherals were drawing power). What can cause a sudden power off? Remove memory from the list. Video controller and sound card typically also would not cause such failure (exceptions exist).

    Some rare environmental problems (ie static eclectic discharge, etc) that might be unique to your locale. Then a replacement computer might not fix anything. Information so that anything Dell does must result in a cure. Make plans in case the System Restore will be executed or if Dell completely replaces the machine. That Service Tag number can be helpful.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2010
  23. CyberWorm

    CyberWorm Registered Member

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    How much load (what was being accessed) when you took those numbers?
    Several IE Windows Opens
    Norton Full System Scan
    MBAM Full System Scan
    5 x 100MB Bin Download Test Files
    Playing DVD
    GPU Stress Test

    Or, in simpler terms, at any time do you feel a static electric discharge?
    No, never

    Can you put the computer in a 30 degree F room?
    No, Thats below freezing point and I don't have that option.

    Your Dell does not connect to a network cable?
    Yes, it connects to a ethernet ran through the power line.

    No printer?
    Nope

    Do monitor and computer connect to a common power strip? Or separately to a 3 prong duplex wall receptacle (it is three prong)?
    They did, I have connected them all seperate and that doesn't make a difference. 3 Prong in-deed.

    Whats in my machine..
    1 D04X8103
    1 STUDIOXPS 8100 : INTEL CORE I5 PROCESSOR
    1 SHIP ACCESSORY : ENGLISH DOCS WITH UK/IR
    1 RESOURCE DVD : STUDIO XPS 8100
    1 MEMORY : 8192MB (4X2GB) 1333MHZ DDR3 DUA This is wrong, its actually 2x3 + 2x1
    1 HARD DRIVE : 1.2TB(2X640GB) SERIAL ATA R
    1 HEATSINK : 65W PROCESSOR HEATSINK
    1 OPTICAL DRIVE : 16X DVD+/-RW DRIVE INCLU
    1 DISPLAY : NOT INCLUDED
    1 GRAPHICS CARD - SINGLE 1GB NVIDIA GEFORC Its a GTX240
    1 AUDIO INTEGRATED HDA 7.1 DOLBY DIGITAL C
    1 SPEAKERS NOT INCLUDED
    1 MICE : DELL OPTICAL, SCROLL USB (2 BUTTO
    1 KEYBOARD : UK/IRISH (QWERTY) DELL MULTIM
    1 OPERATING SYSTEM : ENGLISH GENUINE WINDO
    1 ENGLISH MICROSOFT WORKS 9.0 (WORD PROCES
    1 SOFTWARE : DATASAFE LOCAL 2.0 BASIC
    1 ENGLISH ANTIVIRUS MCAFEE 10.0 SECURITY C
    1 ONE FREE DELL EXPERT CALL TO HELP WITH Y
    1 STANDARD SERVICE - 1 YEAR OF COVERAGE IN
    1 NO WARRANTY UPGRADE
    1 NO ACCIDENTAL DAMAGE SUPPORT
    1 DATASAFE ONLINE BACKUP 2GB
    1 DATASAFE ONLINE SIZE - 2GB TRIAL
    1 NO - DELL MAY NOT TELEPHONE ME IN RELATI
    1 STUDIO XPS 8100 DT ORDER - UK
    1 XPS DT - SYSTEM ONLY



    It is possible that the OS or software can power off the machine instantly?
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2010
  24. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2007
    Posts:
    2,265
    Location:
    Nebraska, USA
    What? o_O That makes no sense. An hour? Huh?
     
  25. CyberWorm

    CyberWorm Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2010
    Posts:
    74
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