Portable vs. full-install apps

Discussion in 'other software & services' started by subssubs, Aug 10, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. subssubs

    subssubs Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2007
    Posts:
    12
    Hi, keeping in mind that I am not very computer-literate, please tell me if the following makes any sense.
    1. My understanding is that portable apps have two distinguishing characteristics:
    • apart from the folder they get installed into, they have zero footprint (ie, no registry impact etc.)
    • they are optimized for USB drives
    2. Also my understanding is that the main problems in Windows (I run XP) derive from the registry and shared resource files.
    Putting 1+2 together, it would appear that it would make sense to install portable apps on the os partition of a standard desktop pc. Please comment on this.

    Also, if the above is (mostly) correct:
    1. how much is lost in performance due to the optimization for USB?
    2. are there clear examples of inferior portables in comparison to the full install app?

    thanks for your help
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2007
  2. eniqmah

    eniqmah Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2006
    Posts:
    391
    1. *Partially correct. Some AV's will update definitions prior to scanning, saving the def +any logs to the USB.

    2. You wouldn't install a portable app, you can certain run it from a folder. The apps are slower on the USBs because of the speed difference in USB and internal drives. Thus, by putting the portable app on the desktop, you make up for that low speed. Clearly, by installing an AV on the desktop, you're installing hooks that load when Windows loads, allowing your AV to monitor for things that add themselves to autoruns. I've not tested, but would think that a portable AV is unable to do that.
     
  3. subssubs

    subssubs Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2007
    Posts:
    12
    Thanks for the correction, I meant copying portable apps and running them from their folder .
    As I read my original post which I quoted above (written too late at night ;) ) I realize that I misworded my question, the idea would be to copy them on the normal os partition of a desktop pc.
    [I will now modify my original post].

    So, enigmah, if I understand you correctly, apart from AVs you wouldn't see any problem with this strategy, or lower performance than a full-install app, am I correct?
    Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2007
  4. lodore

    lodore Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2006
    Posts:
    9,006
    hello,
    with portable opera you cant seem to save and restore sestions with the portable version.
    ive tryed lots of times.
    i can with the normal opera.

    @eniqmah,
    firefox portable loads faster from my corsair usb pen than the installed version does.

    since i mainly use opera i have firefox portable on my desktop so i can use it sometimes.
    lodore
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2007
  5. EASTER

    EASTER Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2007
    Posts:
    5,632
    Location:
    U.S.A. (South)
    I've always favored Standalone apps since Windows 98/Me days. Portables "are" just that and so far i yet to run into any difficulties with any of them and hope to see more of them now USB Pen drives are dropping like a rock in cost.
     
  6. eniqmah

    eniqmah Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2006
    Posts:
    391
    You understood what I meant. I've done some testing since my last post on this thread, security apps that run in real time protection mode on your comp will (generally) have conflicts with portable ones, so make sure you disable the real time protection before using portable scanners. I find that using additional portable scanners could add a little more strength to your set up. For instance, I have VSE 8.5i installed for access protection, and it really spanks most other apps out there in this regard. But as we know, Mcafee detection rates are a little long in the tooth whereas a portable scanner from Nod or Kaspersky say, will perfectly complement the VSE in their higher detection rates when it comes time for some thorough cleaning. As far as other apps, my experience with them is limited. Firefox will load faster or slower depending on, I would bet, the number of extensions. As I've tested it, having the same exact profile and running FF from both the installed version and the portable version made no noticable difference in speed. The most useful thing about these portable apps is probably your ability to use them when you make house calls, or if you're on public terminals that do not have such apps installed.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.