PG3 and SP2 DEP

Discussion in 'ProcessGuard' started by perpetd, Oct 29, 2004.

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  1. perpetd

    perpetd Registered Member

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    I did a search on DEP on the forums and checked the PG 3 documentation but didn't find anything. I am currently a registered user and I'm running the Beta 3 of PG. I was wondering what is recommended in terms of Microsofts DEP (Data Execution Prevention)

    On for essential or on for all programs and services or off?

    I currently haven't seen any problems with it on "for all programs and services" just wondering if there is unneccessary redundancy and/or potential for conflict between DEP and PG?

    Thank you & Regards,

    Perpetd

    P.S. Thanks for excellent products DCS! :)
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2004
  2. Pilli

    Pilli Registered Member

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    Hi perpetd, As far as I know DEP covers a part of memory that malware and also program makers have utilised and that is one of the reasons why MS plugged the hole. Hardware DEP as used in AMD 64 CPUs & Intel will be releasing DEP enable CPU's in the near future, currently the only Intel CPU to do so is the Zeon.
    Games are usually the worst culprits and many need SP2 patches due to the way they have implemented their "shortcuts" in memory:)

    ProcessGuard3 should not cause conflicts with DEP

    From the XP SP2 helpfile:
    Data Execution Prevention (DEP) helps prevent damage from viruses and other security threats that attack by running (executing) malicious code from memory locations that only Windows and other programs should use. This type of threat causes damage by taking over one or more memory locations in use by a program. Then it spreads and harms other programs, files, and even your e-mail contacts.

    Unlike a firewall or antivirus program, DEP does not help prevent harmful programs from being installed on your computer. Instead, it monitors your programs to determine if they use system memory safely. To do this, DEP software works alone or with compatible microprocessors to mark some memory locations as "non-executable". If a program tries to run code—malicious or not—from a protected location, DEP closes the program and notifies you.

    DEP can take advantage of software and hardware support. To use DEP, your computer must be running Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2) or later, or Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 1 or later. DEP software alone helps protect against certain types of malicious code attacks but to take full advantage of the protection that DEP can offer, your processor must support "execution protection". This is a hardware-based technology designed to mark memory locations as non-executable. If your processor does not support hardware-based DEP, it's a good idea to upgrade to a processor that offers execution protection features.


    Cheers. Pilli - Enjoy your weekend :)
     
  3. perpetd

    perpetd Registered Member

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    Thank you for the quick reply. Enjoy your weekend as well :)
     
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