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Discussion in 'all things UNIX' started by TerryWood, Mar 20, 2011.

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  1. TerryWood

    TerryWood Registered Member

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    Hi

    Once again i decided to try Linux (Despite being prejudiced about its difficulty from past attempts which left me thinking that its almost like using the command line in Windows)

    This time I went for the most popular distribution Ubuntu 10.10 and supposedly very usable. I installed using Wubi to end up with a dual boot with 64bit Windows 7 and 64bit Ubuntu. Very easy install a bit long winded but upto Windows standard.

    I started using Firefox and to my surprise Adobe Flash was not installed. The only version available was a 64bit preview version.

    Now in Windows downloading an Adobe plugin is a piece of cake and takes a very few minutes including installing.

    One day after downloading Adobe I still do not have it installed, and my experience is the most perfect example of why Linux is at its current state of minimal usage.

    I am a novice insofar as Linux is concerned, I do want to use it, but I don't want to have to jump through hoops. Beautiful interfaces Linux might be, exasperating and user unfriendly it definitely is.

    What was my problem with the adobe download and install?

    Well no double or single clicking here, convolutions via the terminal program and other means, copious reading on the web still leaves unresolved why I am getting the "You do not have permission to move/install here" message. For gods sake we are only talking about installing into the Firefox plugin folder.

    I thought it must be me, until I read many posts of lonely souls facing the same uphill battle as me. I have used so many combinations of Su, Sudo and others that my head is spinning.

    So I removed Ubuntu, for me it is too much hassle. To aficionados who love challenges I would think it is the stuff of dreams.

    Anyway I would be interested in knowing how you simply can download Adobe Flash preview and install it in Ubuntu in a simple quick and understandable manner (Like Windows)

    Thanks for being patient

    Terry
     
  2. tlu

    tlu Guest

    It's even easier in Ubuntu. Just open Synaptic and chose the package flashplugin-installer from the multiverse repository - ready!

    You gave up too early.
     
  3. mack_guy911

    mack_guy911 Registered Member

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    well if you are new to linux then 1st you should try mint as it come out of box flash ......all installed


    way one

    any ways in ubuntu add repo for 64 bit version if not given also check your repositories in software manager right click an all non-supported repos as well


    2nd way install ubuntu tweak

    it will help you many things to manage in ubuntu

    http://ubuntu-tweak.com/

    download and install .deb (just like exe)

    3rd way go to adobe site download 64 bit deb and install

    http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/

    download 64 bit .deb and install it like windows .exe (ie double click and install) :D
     
  4. mack_guy911

    mack_guy911 Registered Member

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    go for mintlinux as its ubuntu out of box + many great things

    linuxmint.com
     
  5. Ocky

    Ocky Registered Member

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    It's really easy ...

    Download Flashx64, untar it, sudo mv libflashplayer.so /usr/lib/mozilla/plugins

    Then do a sudo ln -sf /usr/lib/mozilla/plugins/libflashplayer.so /usr/lib/firefox-addons/plugins/
    sudo ln -sf /usr/lib/mozilla/plugins/libflashplayer.so /usr/lib/xulrunner-addons/plugins

    mv = move
    ln -sf = soft link

    Some folks just place the libflashplayer.so in the firefox plugins folder. sudo mv libflashplayer.so /home/user/.mozilla/plugins

    There is a nautilus package which gives you a r/click context menu "Open as Administrator" (I think it is nautilus gksu) which makes life much easier as you won't need the terminal for tasks that involve copy/paste, move or edititing files in /.
     
  6. chronomatic

    chronomatic Registered Member

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    OP,

    32 bit flash is in the repositories already, but I don't recommend using it. Use 64 bit instead. Here's how I recommend doing it. Just copy and paste these commands into your terminal:

    command #1

    Code:
    sudo add-apt-repository ppa:sevenmachines/flash
    command #2

    Code:
    sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install flashplugin64-installer
    Restart your browser and then test flash.

    BTW, your complaints about Linux not working like Windows is precisely why most of us use Linux! Your problem is that you seem to have the Windows mindset when it comes to installing software. With Linux, you don't go around to websites and download installer files. Instead you use your package manager to search for and install the software that is in the repositories. You can find your package manager in "Applications ---> Ubuntu Software Center." Or you can use the terminal as I showed above.

    After a while, you will get used to doing things this way and you will come to like it much better than the Windows way. Trust me.
     
  7. Ocky

    Ocky Registered Member

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    Yes, I should have mentioned sevenmachines ppa as I myself have added it. Their updates are always fast and it's better than always remembering to check the site for patched/updated versions. Now that really is easy, once added to software sources no more worries. :cool:
     
  8. tlu

    tlu Guest

    @Ocky and chronomatic: While everything you wrote is technically correct, don't you think that it is way too complicated for a Linux newbie like TerryWood and just confirms his prejudices?
     
  9. Ocky

    Ocky Registered Member

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    Not really tlu, I think TerryWood is a bright spark - he has been on Wilders forums since Jan 2006. :thumb: It's just a matter of having a little patience combined with some spare time.
     
  10. wilbertnl

    wilbertnl Registered Member

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    "Flash Player does not run in most 64-bit browsers"

    Terry, I do understand your frustration, but I also think that it's a bit unfair to put the blame on Linux/Ubuntu when Adobe themselves publish a statement on their website that flash support on most 64-bit systems is troublesome.
    Apple decided to drop support for flash, it would be interesting to see how that effects their customers.

    It would also be interesting to see if 64-bit Google Chrome comes with flash included?
     
  11. TerryWood

    TerryWood Registered Member

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    Hi Everybody

    Thanks for for your contributions. Yes, there is some truth in all the comments you make.

    And prior to reading all the responses I did download Linux Mint, which in my opinions (so far) is light years better for me than Ubuntu.

    For one Flash is already installed so that equals Windows standard. For another the close, maximise & minimise window controls are on the right hand side of Firefox, so as a right handed person there is ergonomic design that suits me. (as opposed to Ubuntu Firefox)

    Yes I probably did give up too early, and thank goodness I did. As I implied in my opening post, I want to get away from Windows and its cost. BUT, I do not want to go backwards.

    Equally, I do not want to become a technogeek, that is one of those who enjoy and revel in comprehending the arcane workings of software. I want things to work out of the box.

    I simply want a pleasant enjoyable EASY experience away from Windows. I do not really want to open one piece of software to help me install another when Windows allows self installation.

    I will let you know my final views on Linux Mint in due course, I will be measuring its success by the number of times I come to Wilders for help.

    Thank you all again

    Terry
     
  12. aigle

    aigle Registered Member

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    It,s so easy for 32 bit ubuntu, not sure about 64 bit.

    1- search in google adobe flash, it automatically opens linux flash page from adobe
    2- choose ubuntu package
    3- download and save
    4- double click the saved deb file
    5- it will install just like in windows

    That,s all. Nothing differenent from windows `IMO.
     
  13. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Terry, you are right.

    OS installation and usage is difficult for less skilled users.
    This is universal, the only question is if you are familiar with something.

    For all practical purposes, Windows is as difficult, although people who use Windows for many years may not remember the initial uphill battle.

    Now, Flash in Ubuntu:

    Open Ubuntu Software Center.
    Type in "flash" in the search box.
    You'll get something like flashplugin-nonfree or such.
    Select, install. Fire up browser and enjoy Flash.

    Cheers,
    Mrk
     
  14. wat0114

    wat0114 Guest

    I understand your frustration Terry, but if you approach it with an unbiased and open mind, take things slowly, figuring out one thing at a time, you'll probably realize as I have that Linux is really an impressive O/S. mack_guy is right about mint. It's an excellent beginners distro.
     
  15. lodore

    lodore Registered Member

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    I would reccomend reading this article about non free software on ubuntu
    linux is different to windows. doesnt mean its harder. you will have to spend some time getting used to it. you didnt learn windows in an hour so dont expect to learn linux in an hour.
     
  16. tlu

    tlu Guest

    The available package in Ubuntu works flawlessly for both 32bit and 64bit.
     
  17. TerryWood

    TerryWood Registered Member

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    Hi All

    Here to test the system again. Installed linux Mint Julia 64 bit.

    Decided to install Avast 1.3.0-2_i386. The Debian package manager threw up an error. "Wrong architecture - i386".

    Research the web shows that this can be overcome by this command.

    dpkg --force-architecture -i xxxx.deb

    I tried to get it to work but I could not can anyone help.

    I am a bit suspicious about the symbol after dpkg it looks like two dashes. I do not have it on my UK keyboard

    Any help gratefully received

    Terry
     
  18. wat0114

    wat0114 Guest

    Checking the Avast! website for linux it seems it only supports x86 (32 bit) platform. It may be possible to force but sorry I can't help. TBH, and a lot of people don't like this kind of response, but you really don't need (in reality anyway) antivirus for Linux. If you insist on installing it, you might want to go with x86 Mint instead.
     
  19. tlu

    tlu Guest

    Indeed - a good reading is this.

    Or use ClamAV available in the repos.
     
  20. Ocky

    Ocky Registered Member

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    If you want to go that route, for example as a courtesy to Windows users to whom you send files, then BitDefender is your friend. Fast with a nice GUI and free.

    Follow instructions here http://download.bitdefender.com/repos/# (The deb part)

    You can also read this thread ... http://download.bitdefender.com/repos/#

    I have just (2 days ago) installed it on Scientific Linux SL 6 - hence 359 days.

    Screenshot-BitDefender Antivirus Scanner for Unices.png
     
  21. mack_guy911

    mack_guy911 Registered Member

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    go slowly on linux mint

    all you need is open gufw enable and block ports 139 445 and 631 thats all

    Linux Mint 10 has three open ports – 139 (netbios-ssn), 445 (microsoft-ds), and 631 (ipp). for samba sharing.....etc

    if you dont use samba sharing which i guss you dont

    as far as antivirus ocky give you great tutorial of bitdefender

    avast force install give you problems in future better you go with bit-defender if you want anti virus its pretty stable

    how much ram do you have by the way@TerryWood
     

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  22. tlu

    tlu Guest

    Really? Since Mint is an Ubuntu derivative this shouldn't be the case.

    Execute

    sudo netstat -tulpen | grep -v '127.0.0.1' | grep -v '::1:'

    and you'll see.

    The only exceptions are port 631 for the cups web interface, port 68 udp for dhclient (needed for DHCP) and some for avahi-daemon which is uncrititical - see here. This should not be different in Mint. Please read also https://wiki.ubuntu.com/DefaultNetworkServices

    And I forgot to mention that gufw is not needed on a normal desktop system. You actually don't need a firewall in Ubuntu at all. In any case

    sudo ufw enable
    sudo ufw default deny

    is sufficient. Anything else is Windows thinking IMHO.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 20, 2011
  23. mack_guy911

    mack_guy911 Registered Member

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    Last edited: Mar 21, 2011
  24. tlu

    tlu Guest

    Have you executed the command shown in my previous posting and with which results?
     
  25. mack_guy911

    mack_guy911 Registered Member

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    sorry no i didnt

    i tried to run but it didnt work :D

    please try zenmap
     
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