OSS with linux

Discussion in 'Acronis Disk Director Suite' started by rabadumpf, Sep 22, 2007.

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  1. rabadumpf

    rabadumpf Registered Member

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    Hello!
    Here is my situation
    Disk 1, Partition 1= Vista, Partition 2= blank, Partition 3= OSS

    Now i want to install linux on Partition 2, and i want to work with oss, which i can choose vista or linux,

    I don´t want to install any bootmananger from linux.

    How must i install linux, without bootmanager from linux? (I´m absolutely new in linux).

    Can i install linux in Partition 2?

    Thanks.
     
  2. MudCrab

    MudCrab Imaging Specialist

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    This can be done, but the steps may be different depending on what distro of Linux you're installing.

    1 - I always recommend that you create an Entire Disk backup image (check the Disk # checkbox) before you do something like this. If you don't have TI, then use whatever imaging software you have. This will allow you to return to your current state if something goes wrong.

    2 - Is Partition 2 blank or is it Unallocated space? Does it have a format?

    3 - If Partition 2 is formatted, what format is it in?

    4 - Are all three partitions Primary or are some Logical?

    To install Linux, you'll normally need at least two partitions: the /root partition and the swap partition. In your case, another partition will need to be created (the swap partition). You can use DD to do this, but you may need to move things around (another reason for the backup). Depending of if the OSS partition gets moved, you may have to reactivate OSS (it should find the existing installation).

    When you install Linux, most use GRUB as the bootloader. It can be installed to the MBR or into the Linux partition. Different distros give different options. Some will ask if you want it in the MBR if it detects something already there (like Windows). Others will just installed it to the MBR without asking. In my tests, OSS works okay either way, but I prefer to install GRUB to the Linux partition.

    To change your partition layout, you may want to do the following:
    Resize Partition 2 to at least 500MB - 1GB smaller.
    Format Partition 2 as Ext3 (or another Linux format if you know what you want).
    Move (slide) Partition 3 (the OSS partition) to the left, leaving the unallocated space after it.
    Create a new partition at the end of the disk, select the type as Linux swap.

    This will keep the OSS partition as Partition #3 and hopefully won't disrupt your setup.
     
  3. latcarf

    latcarf Registered Member

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    seems me and radadumbf are in the same situation except I would not mind using OSS...

    Me with a new Toshiba Satellite A215/S4757 (my first ever laptop), Vista Home Premium 32 Bit wishing to add Suse 10.2 as an alternate OS. I have done dual desk tops before by simply backing up, the clean install of Linux first, Windows second. I assume I could go that route if all else fails. Using a program (Acronis) is breaking new ground for me so I don't want to crash the hard drive in the process!

    From desktop Acronis will not use the free space from the Vista Partition... on Commit and reboot it declares it cannot write to disk 1 sector so and so.

    I made a full version Aconis boot disk and booted to it (selecting Full version) and it declared it could not find the hard drive. It also had USB issues but I assume that is probably the wireless laser mouse.

    I checked the Bios (Pheonix 1.10) and there does not appear to be any modes protecting or hiding the hard drive.

    thoughts!?
     
  4. MudCrab

    MudCrab Imaging Specialist

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    The Full Mode (Linux-based) version of DD is probably not finding your hardware correctly.

    To resize the Vista partition to make room for the other partitions, either resize it using Vista's Disk Management or try booting to the Safe Mode version of DD from the DD CD and doing the procedure. Be aware that if the start of the Vista partition moves, you may have to run a repair.

    You'll have to decide if you want OSS in it's own small partition or if you're going to install it in the Vista partition. I recommend it's own partition. You'll probably have to create the Logical partitions for your setup using DD, since Vista will force you to create three Primary partitions before forcing you to create a Logical partition.

    Is your partition layout like this?
    [??GB Recovery][??GB Vista]

    And you want somthing like this?
    [??GB Recovery][??GB Vista]{100MB OSS FAT32}{1GB Linux Swap}{??GB Suse 10.2 Ext3/etc.}
     
  5. latcarf

    latcarf Registered Member

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    Interesting... didn't realize DD was Linux based!

    To make a short story long... I had purchased DD on eBay thinking I was saving money, all was well until I tried to register with Acronis. I removed that purchase got a refund from the eBay seller and tried the trial version at Acronis.

    Both versions when started from desk top did see the hdd and volumes. Originally the volumes were Toshiba (recovery) and SQ... (Vista). After 2 attempts at creating a partition that appeared to fail all of a sudden my notebook would not reboot so I had to run the recovery disk. When it rebooted properly there was an additional unallocated volume!

    I did not know Vista had a "disk management" feature. I found it and used it to decrease the size of the Toshiba volume as it was way over sized and 90% free space and to also remove the new unallocated volume.

    According to Vista DM my Vista volume is 213GB and it claims it can only free up 96GB. Doesn't sound right... Vista cant possibly need 115GB to operate!

    I assume any repair needed if the Vista partition moves can be done with the supplied Toshiba recovery disks(?).

    OSS versus Grub... thoughts?

    Is your partition layout like this?
    [??GB Recovery][??GB Vista]
    Yes

    And you want something like this?
    [??GB Recovery][??GB Vista]{100MB OSS FAT32}{1GB Linux Swap}{??GB Suse 10.2 Ext3/etc.}
    Sounds reasonable...
    I would have thought it would be more like this
    [??GB Recovery][??GB Vista]{??GB Suse 10.2 Ext3/etc.}
    with the letter containing \, \root, and swap. But browsing through the forum and seeing your response I see where it makes sense to have OSS separate.
     
  6. MudCrab

    MudCrab Imaging Specialist

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    As far as I know, the trial version of DD when booted from the CD will not let you actually apply any changes. You can only apply changes in Windows.

    Vista will sometimes show an amount when you select to shrink that is larger than what it can be. You can try and force it down by entering a smaller number and seeing if it will take it. I don't think Vista will "move" anything to shrink the partition. You may need to remove the swap file, turn off System Restore, do a defrag and then try the shrink again. This may give you more room. After the resize is done, you can recreate the swap file and turn System Restore back on.

    Maybe, maybe not. A lot of people can't use "brand" Vista DVDs to do repairs.

    I haven't used GRUB with Vista, but I think others have.

    You will have to at least have a Linux Swap partition. If you don't have one, then SUSE may create one (Ubuntu will, but SUSE may work without a swap partition). SUSE installs in a fairly automatic mode, so you may have to look at the partitioning step manually (during the install) and make sure it's doing what you want.

    The reason for a separate OSS partition is so that you can restore your Vista or SUSE partition, etc. without having to restore your OSS files. This could cause problems if it's in an older state in the restored image.

    Also, I don't know if GRUB will add Vista to its menu or not.
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2007
  7. latcarf

    latcarf Registered Member

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    I successfully loaded Suse 10.2 x86 64 bit this morning... Reboot after install was of course the breath holding session.

    All went well and the notebook booted to an initial screen allowing to boot to Suse, Windows, and Suse Fail Safe. Of course I booted to Windows to make sure that did not become a disaster during Linux install

    I appreciate your thoughts, responses, and help! :)

    Tx, Lance
     
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