NORTON and MCAFEE Tracking by US Goverment

Discussion in 'other security issues & news' started by rodneym, Mar 10, 2009.

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  1. rodneym

    rodneym Registered Member

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  2. woodworker3

    woodworker3 Registered Member

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    What does the old and well known "magic lantern" project have to do with yesterday's Norton PIFTS issue? I haven't seen anyone drawing the two together before. Have you discovered some new smoking gun?
     
  3. funkydude

    funkydude Registered Member

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    ESET is Slovakian based, so I can safely say even if all that conspiracy rubbish was true, I very much doubt ESET would "give a sh**" about the US.
     
  4. ugly

    ugly Registered Member

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    This has nothing to do with ESS support and it belongs to "other anti-virus software" section.
     
  5. dw426

    dw426 Registered Member

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    Can we stop with the conspiracy crap already? The Norton threads are getting old. Magic Lantern is long outdated and has absolutely nothing to do with this. Norton screwed up, and it cost them a hell of a public relations mess, nothing more, nothing less. I've already said time and time again, if you're worried about tracking, don't look to anyone but your own ISP. Norton doesn't give a crap what you do, neither does ESET, neither does McAfee. All this post does is add more fuel to the fire, and the fire is already big enough thank you. Some people need to log off the internet and get out more.
     
  6. mvdu

    mvdu Registered Member

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    Magic Lantern (at least in updated form) could still be a concern, though I'm personally not as worried about the government now. It's good that people here stay on top of our privacy.
     
  7. AKAJohnDoe

    AKAJohnDoe Registered Member

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  8. dw426

    dw426 Registered Member

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    It's long gone, no longer in use. The antivirus companies in question did not then and, as far as I have been made aware, do not now exclude any surveillance software, for the simple fact that antivirus and antispyware companies are not and, in the foreseeable future, will not be informed of any software techniques in use, for quite obvious reasons. Once more, I will remind you that your ISP is going to be the first stop for any law enforcement investigation of online activity.

    You're quite welcome to believe/spread any story you wish regarding what government and law enforcement officials can/can't do and will/won't do. I can assure you that a large amount of FUD makes their jobs that much easier.
     
  9. EASTER

    EASTER Registered Member

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    Ha!

    Those are two AV entities that could use some serious oversite. I have it on good authority neither are all that efficient or dependable and climb throughout a PC like a nest of spiders whenever a user decides to uninstall all that mess.
     
  10. nomarjr3

    nomarjr3 Registered Member

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    These two AV companies I keep an eye out for.

    Considering the fact that both these companies have a history with regards with their business schemes and/or software issues.
     
  11. dw426

    dw426 Registered Member

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    I can't disagree there, both are an absolute PITA to uninstall (and I've having a hard time trusting Norton at the moment), but the point of my post is to provide the information I have available to try to keep people from seeing this thread and becoming afraid that their security products are being used in some Orwellian scheme. The truth is not always pretty, but certainly FUD and intentional misinforming does far more damage. Many concerning things are going on in governments all over the world, but not all those out in the field agree with the vast majority of these sorely misinformed officials.

    I can tell you with 100% certainty that the majority of the law enforcement community are not pleased to be playing spy or spending time and money on investigations with very little to no credible evidence because someone in Washington wants to "spice up" his or her record in preparation for the next election. It is the same within the military, the facts, situations, and opinions are quite different when you ask the ones out in the field and not sitting behind a desk or standing in front of a camera with a microphone in hand.
     
  12. mvdu

    mvdu Registered Member

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    I assure you that I will believe what I want to, and you are free to deny. Frankly, our perspectives couldn't be more different. The AV companies are not immune to anything in my book.
     
  13. dw426

    dw426 Registered Member

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    Very well.
     
  14. Iam_me

    Iam_me Registered Member

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    If you want to be goverment and hacker "safe"..


    Switch to openBSD.. :D :) Safest OS out there..
     
  15. TechOutsider

    TechOutsider Registered Member

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    That was an incident following 9-11-2001...

    If you really want information about ML and major AV companies, use Google Scholar, not web search. I haven't heard a peep about ML since 2001-02. 9-11 fueled the need (or want) for such a keylogger, some people believed it would have stopped 9-11 from ever happening.
     
  16. Searching_ _ _

    Searching_ _ _ Registered Member

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    I seem to remember an episode on the Discovery Channel about the Future of Law Enforcement, or some such title.
    In it they describe a method for the FBI to overcome people of a compound, waco like, first entering their computer via Anti-Virus updates then detonating an EMP Grenade.

    For reference:
    They also had shown radar like guns that show how much money you have in your pocket, sticky foam, invisibility suits, invisible troop carriers and helicopters, car stoppers, but that would be off topic.

    Tried to find the episode via google but no luck.
     
  17. dw426

    dw426 Registered Member

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    It was not through AV updates (once again, there is absolutely no truth to AV companies exempting law enforcement keyloggers or other malware), but rather through what we know now as a drive by download, which was done by redirecting. As far as power, they can shut off the main breaker if it's outside the home. EMP grenades do not yet exist (from what I am told), but the technology IS there and they are working on it. Right now it only exists in large bombs, including nuclear weapons.

    Impulse Synthetic Aperture Radar, is what you are referring to as "radar-like guns". This technology exists and is in current use. High-Power Electromagnetic Systems are your "car stoppers". It uses microwave energy to disable the engines computer system, killing the engine. This is also in use in various forms around the world. Both of these technologies are sold in differing versions to the U.S and other countries. The U.S military currently has the most advanced versions of both.

    Nanotechnology is what is being used to develop the "invisible suits". It's not impossible at all, but currently (from my information), it is not there just yet. It is the same within the military as it is in any of the other law enforcement and government agencies, underfunding is what is killing these projects, not lack of technology.

    I've seen that with my own eyes. With money, possibilities are abundant, for both the government and civilian sectors. Without it, many technological breakthroughs that could save lives, bring efficiency, and just make life much easier for us and the people that protect us, sit tucked away in the corners of labs.
     
  18. Kerodo

    Kerodo Registered Member

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    Yeah, amen, this says it all folks. Come on....... It's getting ridiculous lately around here with the Symantec/Norton threads..... enough is enough. :rolleyes:
     
  19. TechOutsider

    TechOutsider Registered Member

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    Emphasizes the need for layered security. Don't just rely on one AV. I use online scanners for example.
     
  20. Warlockz

    Warlockz Registered Member

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    I guess we will never know about classified information, until it is updated and techniques are changed, because we arent the government, are we?

    So we cant really say they do or dont have the clasified technology everyone is ranting about, because it all ends up being just another theory or conspericy theory, and nothing but endless circles of redundint/null conversations!

    If your paranoid about NORTON and MCAFEE, switch to somthing els like Nod32, kaspersky, ECT
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2009
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