No Hard Drives Found

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by Spinwide, Jul 25, 2006.

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  1. Spinwide

    Spinwide Registered Member

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    Hi,

    I just purchased and installed True Image 9.0 on an XP pro SP2 machine. After completing the installation process and starting up True Image, I keep getting an error message that reads: Error E000101F4 Acronis...has not found any hard disk drives.

    I've downloaded the current build, 3677. Did a search on the forums and found an extremely dense, technical thread with this same error message but that guy's problem seemed related to a RAID controller card. I've got two internal SATA drives, no RAID.

    Still waiting for a reply from tech support @ Acronis so I thought to ask here, too. Any suggestions?

    TIA.
     
  2. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    You may have an interest in these two threads.

    Have you tried creating the Bootable Rescue CD and then boot from the user created CD. It's worth a try. What brand hard drive and how are they installed? (from MB or PCI card)?

    Also the setting referenced in the first link is this:
    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=137250#2
    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=136701
     
  3. Spinwide

    Spinwide Registered Member

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    Grover,

    Thank you for responding. I noticed a couple of other threads raising the same question as mine and found the answer in one of them...I had to download the new drivers (which I thought would be in the current build, but what do I know).

    Anyway, all is good now and it's time to get on with learning the software.
     
  4. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    That's good news. The program has saved me so many times by being able to restore a previous image. You never know when something will happen--such as a virus or hard drive failure or some little change by the user. Do your backups often and store them in different places--ie Internal, external & DVD or CD. Have multiple options should you need to restore.

    If you do not have another drive, then you should seriously consider either another internal or external. Also do some backups from the user created recovery CD.
    Good luck.
    Grover
     
  5. Spinwide

    Spinwide Registered Member

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    Grover,

    I just completed setting up Startup Recovery Manager and Snap Restore on my system and have a question.

    In reading the manual section for Recovery Manager it states that "when performing Snap Restore, the current ATI Home version always restores the entire system disk. Therefore, if your system disk consists of several partitions, all of them must be included into the image. Any partitions which are missing from the image will be lost." I've got two internal disks with Disk 1 containing WinXP on a logical partition and two other extended partitions containing Data files and a backup of digital images. Am I correct in interpreting the manual statement to mean that all three of my Disk 1 partitions must be on the disk image? Especially because of the digital images, this will result in quite a large disk image. I was hoping to just backup and image the C:\WinXP partition alone.

    What do you think?
     
  6. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    Other forum members are more than welcome to add their comments.

    1. I do not
    .. use Snap Restore..nor Startup Recovery...nor Secure Zone.
    I previously used the startup recovery and Secure Zone but after reading all the problems on the forum, I became convinced those options increased the possibility of me having problems--so I removed those options.

    2. I backup to other internal drives and other external drives plus I copy many of my backups onto DVD (archival). All my backups are created spanning 1492mb in size. I never backup direct to DVD media--too slow and too un-predictable.

    3. Once of your first backups should be to backup the full disk using the disk selection option. This backup includes all partitions. Thus, if you had to replace your hard drive, your new drive could be replicated from the full disk image with all the partitions intact.

    4. After full disk backup (#3) is completed, then you can backup individual partitions without any problems. My setup is much like yours. My boot disk is a SATA drive consisting of 3 partitions. I frequently ATI backup only my C drive (system drive) but only occasionally ATI backup my D and E drives. Actually, any changes to D or E are copied to other internal drives (drive F & G) on a nightly basis using Replicator by Karen Kenworthy. I have MyDocuments and my email on D & E.

    5. My most recent restore was a couple days ago where I restored only my system partition (drive C). The other 2 partitions on the drive were current and did not need to be restored. The restore was successful--as has been all my other ATI restores. I used the normal restore from the user created Recovery CD since I was restoring the system partition. In fact, I do all my restores from the Recovery CD--restoring tib files located on other internal drives. Likewise, many of my backups are created via the Recovery CD.

    6. Most of my ATI backups are of the single partition variety but I do try to make a full disk backup on a regular basis--as a safety precaution in case of hard drive failure. It's a lot easier to do a few ATI restores than to have to do a fresh load of the entire OS and then all the personal program installed.

    7. If you do not have an external drive, you should give it serious consideration. It provides additional room for multiple backups and it adds another safety factor. I assume you are storing your .tib files on the second SATA drive. If you are using a Secure zone, it should be on the second drive.

    8. Perhaps others would comment about the functions of Snap Restore--since I do not & have not used that function.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2006
  7. Spinwide

    Spinwide Registered Member

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    hhmmm...too bad, that takes out quite a few features of the software but it sounds like a good strategy, especially if there've been issues. Thanks for the food for thought.
     
  8. GroverH

    GroverH Registered Member

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    Others on the forum use the Startup Recovery and the Secure zone and have had good results. My personal preferance is as I stated. My computer use is strictly for personal use. Most likely you read the same posts as I so you can see there is a variety of opinions and backup strategies. Find what works for you just make sure you are able to recover should all your internal hard drives fail.

    Many (not all) suggest the additional use of an external drive for backup storage and they disconnect and remove the external from the computer as soon as the backup has been completed. This disconnect help the external out of harm's way. I find this very practical.
     
  9. bVolk

    bVolk Registered Member

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    Hello Spinwide,

    I don't use Snap Restore either, but yes, you should restore the whole disk with that tool or it will delete the partitions not included in the restoration. With regular restore, you can restore C: only.

    As GroverH says, having a second drive for backup storage you don't need the Secure Zone. Moreover, the Startup Recovery Manager is a small convenience that disables the option to start Windows in Safe Mode by F8. A very expensive luxury in my opinion.

    I would create a whole disk image and then delete the Secure Zone. That will also disactivate SRM and re-enable F8 for Win Safe Mode.

    And, start simple (I'm late here ...). Forget the fashionable bells and whistles untill you are fluent with TI basic functions and you are sure that you actually need some of the many extras.
     
  10. Menorcaman

    Menorcaman Retired Moderator

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    Hello Spinwide,

    In case there is some confusion, when bVolk says "delete the Secure Zone" he means remove it via the Manage Acronis Secure Zone Wizard. If you just delete it via Windows Disk Management it won't deactivate the Startup Recovery Manager (hence no Windows F8 Safe boot) plus you will be left with unallocated space on your hard drive that's equal in size to the deleted SZ.

    Regards
     
  11. Spinwide

    Spinwide Registered Member

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    bVolk and Menorcaman--thanks for the heads up concerning no SafeMode option. I agree that's too high a price to pay for a bell or whistle.
     
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