New Research Result: Cold Boot Attacks on Disk Encryption

Discussion in 'other security issues & news' started by mizar, Feb 21, 2008.

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  1. mizar

    mizar Registered Member

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    Story
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2008
  2. lucas1985

    lucas1985 Retired Moderator

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    Interesting :eek: :eek: :eek:
    I always wondered about the effect of cooling on the capacitance of DRAM chips.
     
  3. mizar

    mizar Registered Member

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    Yes indeed it is but i think it is a little bit paranoia. Attacker should be able to replace chips in a couple of minutes, though interesting:thumb:
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2008
  4. ccsito

    ccsito Registered Member

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    Guess the system administrators are going to have to go back to the drawing board. :D :p
     
  5. Longboard

    Longboard Registered Member

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    It's obviously a very real risk if HW gets misplaced ie "laptops on the road trip"
    Nicely produced video and nice discussion thread at freedom to tinker

    Retitle for the masses: "Think your laptop is safe if you encrypt: think again !!"
    This sort of stuff must give some companies admins the "absolute shivers" heh.

    Subeditors dream: 'breaking disc encryption with RAM dumps' lol
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2008
  6. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Hello,

    The solution would be:

    1. a fail-safe mechanism that drains the capacitators when the case is opened.

    2. an enclosure of such a nature for the memory chips.

    3. a no-power mechanism that prevents the comp from turning on if the temperature of the relevant modules is below a certain temperature - say 0 degrees C. Run a Monte Carlo experiment for typical 100 chips, see the average decay time for a typical range of temperatures and introduce a restart-delay mechanism, of let's say, 14 seconds, between two consequtive power offs/ons.

    Problem solved.

    Oh, and put everything in a titanium box, place a charge of C4 and a blob of 5Cu Am-241 inside.

    Mrk
     
  7. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Hello,
    I guess the words Monte Carlo and Am-241 were too frightening...
    Mrk
     
  8. lucas1985

    lucas1985 Retired Moderator

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    LOL, this is THE solution :D
     
  9. Pedro

    Pedro Registered Member

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    Cold bits as a security bypass
    Bypassing disk encryption with a spray can
    By Scott Bradner
     
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