New PC?

Discussion in 'hardware' started by bgoodman4, Mar 7, 2009.

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  1. bgoodman4

    bgoodman4 Registered Member

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    I am thinking about picking up a new PC and have found what sounds like a good deal but am not knowledgeable to know if it really is or if there should be upgrades made to some of the components. Here are the details.

    CORE 2 QUAD
    ASUS P5Q-SE MOTHERBOARD
    3 GB DDR2 RAM 899 MHz
    500 GB 7200rpm 16MB SATA HARD DRIVE
    RADEON HD3650 512MB PCI-E VIDEO
    VANTEC ALL-IN-1 CARD READER
    COOLER MASTER CENTURIAN 5 CASE
    LG 20x DVD-/+RW &CDRW LS
    INTEGRATED 3D SOUND CARD
    SUB-WOOFER SPEAKER SYSTEM
    LOGITEC KEYBOARD
    LOGITEC OPTICAL SCROLL MOUSE
    INTEGRATED 100/1000 NETWORK CARD
    C2Q Q9550 2.66

    COST (Canadian $) $1,049

    I assume the OS is Vista but the brochure I picked up in the store does not state this (or which version of Vista it might be).

    Also, is there anything else I need to find out about regarding the system?

    Thanks
     
  2. renegade08

    renegade08 Registered Member

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    Shouldn't be this posted in hardware sub-forum ?

    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/forumdisplay.php?f=49

    You didn't stated for what purpose you intednt to use you new PC?
    Regular use, gaming, audio-video editing, etc.

    Can some components be changed if you want or not?

    A typo maybe ?
    AFAIK i have never hear of DDR 899 MHz memory.
    Maybe you are refering to 800 MHz.

    What brend is memory and HDD ?


    Renegade
     
  3. prius04

    prius04 Registered Member

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    Perhaps likewise with respect to "C2Q Q9550 2.66"? Is not the Q95xx 2.83 and the Q94xx 2.66?
     
  4. bgoodman4

    bgoodman4 Registered Member

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    You are correct, I should have posted this in the hardware forum, sorry about that. As to the questions all I know at this point is what I got from the brochure. The store is closed today (its in an industrial area) but on Mon I will inquire and post the ans.
     
  5. RAD

    RAD Registered Member

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    I would strongly urge you to compare what you are getting with what you could put together yourself from components from www.newegg.com
    :thumb:

    If you need help making sure things are compatable, give them a call. The website has an enormous amount of user feedback for nearly every component also.
     
  6. prius04

    prius04 Registered Member

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    Always an excellent idea and prudent since you'll be able to get an idea of whether or not the pre-built is way over-priced. :D

    From what I've saw on the Egg, the price quoted seems reasonable *provided* the specs are the same as set forth in the OP (Q9550, et al). Admittedly, it was a quickie, but I wasn't able to put together a similarly configured system for much less than ~900 CAD (I did the currency conversion) and that was without an OS (add another ~100 for, say, an OEM version of Vista HP from Newegg).
     
  7. bgoodman4

    bgoodman4 Registered Member

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    The idea of checking component prices against the advertised system is a good one, can't imagine why I did not think of it myself. I did check the specs on the brochure and I did make a typo, its RAM 800 MHz. I will find out more about the offered system and post it on Monday.
     
  8. bgoodman4

    bgoodman4 Registered Member

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    PS: I would also thank you folks for any comments regarding the components listed quality. I would rather pay a bit more and get reliability. I really only have bough off the shelf so to speak so I am on new ground here. Do I just assume because a component is more expensive that its better. Just kidding.....but how do I find this sort of info, it has to be a critical component of the process in building a PC (figuratively speaking).
     
  9. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    If it does not say an OS is included, I would not assume one is.

    For beginners (and experienced too) I recommend you check out MWave's "Motherboard Bundles" Wizard. This is a great research tool as it allows you to pick a motherboard, then the Wizard will offer a big list of CPUs and RAM that MWave has already determined are compatible with that motherboard. Or, you can start with a CPU and the wizard will list a bunch of motherboards and RAM options that will support that CPU. This is a great research tool you can use even if you buy elsewhere (although their prices are fairly competitive once you factor in shipping - if you live in the US). However, for only $10 more, MWave will mount the CPU and RAM on the motherboard AND test them. So not only do you know from the Wizard that your components work together, you know from the testing your specific parts will not be DOA - a nice warm fuzzy for only $10. ;)
     
  10. YeOldeStonecat

    YeOldeStonecat Registered Member

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    I love Asus motherboards
    I prefer Crucial RAM...select RAM from their website that is specifically tested on and approved compatible with your specific motherboard.
    I like Antec and especially Seasonic power supplies.
    Seagate or WD hard drives..their 3 year warranty or higher models.
    I like Logitechs keyboards 'n mice and joysticks....but I never ever install their software, Windows drivers work fine with them.
     
  11. TechOutsider

    TechOutsider Registered Member

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    Your video card is too weak, for gaming that is.I would rather have a Pentium 4 with a GTX, over a Core 2 Quad and a HD3650. Video cards of that caliber can't use 512MB of memory. Unfortuantly, I have a Core 2 Quad with a similar card, and have been very disappointed with gaming.

    Other than that, your video card is fine.
     
  12. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Well, I don't know about "too weak" but certainly, today's games rely more on the GPU and its resources than it does the CPU. But P4 over a Core 2 Quad? No.

    The best gaming experiences comes with the best graphics solutions. So the more money you can put in a card, generally speaking, the better. Check out
    Toms Hardware - Best Graphics Cards for the Money, Feb 2008.

    I didn't see a PSU. Use the eXtreme PSU Calculator Lite to determine your power supply unit (PSU) requirements. Plug in all the hardware you think you might have in 2 or 3 years (extra drives, bigger or 2nd video card, more RAM, etc.). Be sure to read and heed the notes at the bottom of the page. I recommend setting Capacitor Aging to 30%, and if you participate in distributive computing projects (e.g. BOINC or Folding@Home), I recommend setting TDP to 100%. Research your video card and pay particular attention to the power supply requirements for your card listed on your video card maker's website. If not listed, check a comparable card (same graphics engine and RAM) from a different maker. The key specifications, in order of importance are:
    1. Current (amperage or amps) on the +12V rail,
    2. Efficiency,
    3. Total wattage.
    Then look for power supply brands listed under the "Good" column of PC Mechanic's PSU Reference List. Ensure the supplied amperage on the +12V rails of your chosen PSU meets the requirements of your video card. Don't try to save a few dollars by getting a cheap supply. Digital electronics, including CPUs, RAM, and today's advanced graphics cards, need clean, stable power. A good, well chosen supply will provide years of service and upgrade wiggle room. I strongly recommend you pick a supply with an efficiency rating equal to, or greater than 80%. Look for the 80 Plus - EnergyStar Compliant label. And don't forget to budget for a good UPS with AVR (automatic voltage regulation).
     
  13. bgoodman4

    bgoodman4 Registered Member

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    Excellent, now I have something to work with. Thanks to all (and in advance to any who may yet post).

    I am not into gaming but I do CAD work so I suspect the same applies regarding the video card.
     
  14. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Nope. Gaming and design are two different things. For serious CAD/CAE work, you need a serious professional card - such as the Quadro FX 5800, for only $3500.

    Still, a good gaming card will probably do well for all but the most demanding design work.
     
  15. Bob D

    Bob D Registered Member

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  16. renegade08

    renegade08 Registered Member

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    Now you are getting on right track with your answers.
     
  17. bgoodman4

    bgoodman4 Registered Member

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  18. bgoodman4

    bgoodman4 Registered Member

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    Hummmm, a bit out of my budget. Something a tad more modestly priced will suffice I think. :doubt:
     
  19. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    They are small, less than 6" x 12" - get two! ;)

    Well, then go for the most the budget can afford.
     
  20. bgoodman4

    bgoodman4 Registered Member

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    Yes of course ---- to both points.:cool:
     
  21. yashau

    yashau Registered Member

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    Wow over one grand?

    I'm pretty sure you can get better than that.

    Oh wait are you buying a pre-built one? If so then I guess it's alright.
     
  22. bgoodman4

    bgoodman4 Registered Member

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    I have never built my own computer and time does not permit me to do so now. I do like the idea of having one built for me specifically to my needs though. I have been having problems (which may have been solved) with my current PC and was considering just junking the old one and replacing it with the one mentioned above. If I had to junk the old one I would not have the time to wait for a custom built one so off the shelf would be my only option. At this point though it does not look like I will have to do this.
     
  23. yashau

    yashau Registered Member

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    I can build a PC from scratch in 15mins flat. That said I do; do this for a living.
     
  24. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

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    Assembling a computer is no big deal. It's the hours, even days for some that it takes to install and setup the OS, security, productivity applications, printers, etc. that takes a toll on time and attention. Then it can take even longer to get it tweaked just the way you like it.

    The advantage of having someone else do it is you have someone you can yell at besides yourself or the dog - always good for stress! ;)

    That said, building your own offers the huge advantage of the knowledge you pick up doing it. Also, when you build your own, if done carefully by starting with a good case and power supply, you will never have to build a new computer again - or at least not for 10 years or longer - you just upgrade piece by piece - which saves lots of money in the long run.
     
  25. bgoodman4

    bgoodman4 Registered Member

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    This makes sense and perhaps is something I will actually do ,,,,,, eventually. As to the upgrading of components I would imagine this would be possible even if I had someone else customize a system for me...... As to actually building it myself I would imagine there are websites where I could find out how to do this, are there any you folks would recommend?
     
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