New PC needs protection from kids!

Discussion in 'other security issues & news' started by Simon6776, May 17, 2007.

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  1. Simon6776

    Simon6776 Registered Member

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    Hi folks,

    A friend has a new Dell PC on order, and they have asked me if there is any way to parentally control the installation of programs which the kids might download. Basically, they would like to be able to password protect the PC, so that nothing can be installed without the parent's knowledge and consent. This might seem a little bit strong, but their last PC was totally buggered by the kids downloading all sorts of crap, and although it needed replacing anyway, being about 8 years old, they don't want the same thing to happen to the new one.

    Any suggestions?

    TIA :)

    Simon.
     
  2. Pedro

    Pedro Registered Member

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    A fellow member has this to share.
     
  3. Simon6776

    Simon6776 Registered Member

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    Oh, that does actually look really good, and I will certainly promote that to the family, but will it actually stop applications from being installed from, say, a free magazine CD?
     
  4. Rmus

    Rmus Exploit Analyst

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    This was related to me recently by a friend.

    Parents with two young children decided the kids were old enough to use the computer themselves. They set up separate limited user accounts for each. The kids felt proud that they had "their own private space."

    Important here was how they led into this. The kids understand that there are certain house rules: don't go out alone, etc, and "permission to install" is one of the rules. Explained in this way, it's not so much a restriction, but "it's just the way we do things in our home."

    This helps for the inevitable "but Billy gets to download what he wants."

    The parent's plan is that by the time the kids are in their teens, they will have their own computer and be in charge of everything themselves. Meanwhile, these next two years are used to teach them security, responsibility, and how to use common sense.

    regards,

    -rich
     
  5. Rmus

    Rmus Exploit Analyst

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  6. Simon6776

    Simon6776 Registered Member

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    I think the limited user account is probably the answer, Rich, so thanks for that. I think what I might do, is set up one Administrator account, and one 'Family' account, which will be limited, then that would circumvent any complications with multiple user accounts, given that there are 7 in the family.
     
  7. mercurie

    mercurie A Friendly Creature

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    Simon,
    Each user in my family has their own account it gives them responsibility to control there own accounts with their own stuff.

    However, they are all limited and I think that is an excellent suggestion. The kids have locked it up on occassion but as far as infections or any real issues. There are none to report. :thumb:

    See Family PC for set up below. I am behind a Router with Firewall of course. :)
     
  8. OldMX

    OldMX Registered Member

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    Limited User Account+ K9 Web Protection is a very good choice
     
  9. Simon6776

    Simon6776 Registered Member

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    They have decided on two Administrator accounts, and the rest will be limited users. We have also installed F-Secure IS, with the Parental Control component, and this is working well so I think we're there.

    Thanks guys! :thumb:
     
  10. eniqmah

    eniqmah Registered Member

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    I have lots of friends over and they constantly use my computers. I handle this issue in the following ways:

    1. Deepfreeze
    2. Router control
    3. Strict firewall policies.

    Before I learned enough to do all of this, I simply used zonealarm pro.
     
  11. The Hammer

    The Hammer Registered Member

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    Maybe Anti-executable?
     
  12. steve161

    steve161 Registered Member

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    I agree. Faronics anti-executable has recieved very favorable reviews in this forum. Also, I tried out Exe Lockdown and found it effective and very light. It is a free program. It will block anything not on your whitelist from executing and can be password protected. It is also simple to use (the proof being me).
     
  13. Perman

    Perman Registered Member

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    Hi, folks: Setting up limited account may be a smart solution to your situation, this will prevent kids from installing any programs. but have you thought about the cleanup after their internet surfing? spywares, cookies and internet history may just few of all that can take up your pc's disk spaces and can joepartise pc's system security. I would do as most educational institutions have done: install DeepFreeze or its alike and Anti-Executives or its alike. No matter how smart your kids may be, or how wild their actions may be, nothing of those will harm your pc at all. You not only have a peace of mind ,but also have a lot free time by not cleaning up your pc's debris. This concept works for many schools and libraries. IMO it should,no doubt, work for you. Good luck.
     
  14. Perman

    Perman Registered Member

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    hi, folks: Just an extension to my previous post. If you want your kids to enjoy a true computer experiences-being able to d/l games to play for free or any program to use before next reboot. You may set AE aside. Mind you ,both apps are password protected, kids have no means to altert them.
     
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