New malware detects browser, shows fake malware warning page

Discussion in 'malware problems & news' started by Searching_ _ _, Sep 3, 2010.

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  1. Searching_ _ _

    Searching_ _ _ Registered Member

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    New malware detects browser - Ars Technica
     
  2. ronjor

    ronjor Global Moderator

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    Rogue:MSIL/Zeven wants a piece of the Microsoft Security Essentials pie

    Microsoft
     
  3. JRViejo

    JRViejo Global Moderator

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    Merged threads to combine two separate articles on the same subject.
     
  4. dw426

    dw426 Registered Member

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    Easily spotted by adding in the term "upgrade". What is there to upgrade by leaving a website? Anyone who has ever seen these warnings come up in the past knows what they look like. It's a cute trick as I'm sure both the "proceed" and "leave" options accomplish the same thing, installing the malware. There are three big red flags here, and I'm not even counting the misspelling as one of them.

    1. Using the term "upgrade" on the leave this page option.

    2. Now this may be incorrect, but I don't remember the statement "How can I be protected?" in these warnings. There is simply a Proceed or Leave option.

    3. The "Firefox recommends" statement about reliable malware protection, coupled with the "upgrade" option which is non-existent in a real warning.

    The IE warning looks much more realistic, except the warning, yet again, about "upgrading" as a part of the proceed to website option. One last thing, anyone who falls for that "Google Advice" warning on the other screenshot, well, I don't know what to say. Google has, as far as I know, NEVER warned about needing malware protection. And, lol, of course, that "update" option shows its face again right next to it.

    "So accurate it can trick even highly trained eyes"? Sure, if those highly trained eyes suddenly get transferred to Mr. Magoo. Yet another case of media scare. If you spent literally 2 seconds looking at these "warnings", it wouldn't trick you.
     
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