New harddisk partitioning help

Discussion in 'all things UNIX' started by bman412, Dec 20, 2009.

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  1. bman412

    bman412 Registered Member

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    So I got this new 500 gig harddisk that I need help partioning with. Kinda planning to multi-boot with windows and perhaps ubuntu (still contemplating). What would be the ideal partition sequence for this?

    Primary (windows) - Primary (ubuntu?) - Extended (for data)

    Is that good?

    Another question is can ubuntu or other distros read/write to the data partition if it is formatted as NTFS?
     
  2. wat0114

    wat0114 Guest

    I just did mine as seen in the ss. I had my system and data backup partitions, so i had ~ 30GB remaining. You can have only a max of 4 partitions so you can see after I created the root partition, an extended partition was necessary to accomodate the swap and /Home partitions. The root and Home partitions I formatted in ext4 using a Gparted live cd. I use Partition Wizard disk to format/resize the Windows partitions. Ignore the 3.14 MB "Unallocated" partition. Not important.

    BTW, I placed the Grub in the Linux root partition (sda3). This way I can use Windows boot manager to handle which O/S i want to run at boot. I used Windows EasyBCD to add the grub file to the startup options.

    I don't know about this.
     

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  3. Eice

    Eice Registered Member

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    Most (if not all) distros should be able to read/write to NTFS without problems. As for formatting drives into NTFS, installing the ntfsprogs package solves that problem.
     
  4. Ocky

    Ocky Registered Member

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    I think you can do it from a live cd as well.
     
  5. bman412

    bman412 Registered Member

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    Wouldn't it be a better layout to have windows and linux partitions on the first and second partitions of the harddisk and push the data partition to the last slot?
     
  6. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    No reason to waste a primary partition on Ubuntu, you can go with logical.
    Mrk
     
  7. bman412

    bman412 Registered Member

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    So I bumped into a slight problem :D Apparently my partition manager cannot format to ext3/ext4 so can I just allocate a logical partition for a later linux install and let the live cd format and repartition it later to ext4?

    Code:
    [------------------------- Hard disk ----------------------------]
    [-- Primary --][------------------- Extended --------------------]
    [-- windows --][-- linux --][----------- data storage -----------]
    
    Better yet, can I just leave some unformatted space for a later linux installation? Will the live CD be able to see this unformatted space?
     
  8. wat0114

    wat0114 Guest

    I could have used Partition Wizard to slide the data part over to the right, then place Linux to the right of the Windows active part, but it didn't matter to me at the time. Not sure if it's any advantage anyways?
     
  9. bman412

    bman412 Registered Member

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    Well thanks everyone for the tips. New hd all fine and settled now, I hope :D
    Now to browse and decide on which distro to use, which will definitely take a while cos of bandwidth limitations.
     
  10. wat0114

    wat0114 Guest

    Good to see! Maybe try Mint :thumb:

    BTW, I decided to slide the backup part over, then re-create the linux parts to the right of the Windows System part. Too bad my backed up Linux parts wouldn't work in them...grrrr :mad: Oh well, live and learn. Anyways, good news is after re-installing Mint I can now see the Windows and backup parts from Linux. Before I had some sort of mount errors :)
     
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