New build reboots when entering bios

Discussion in 'hardware' started by Get, Aug 7, 2013.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Get

    Get Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2009
    Posts:
    384
    Location:
    the Netherlands
    Hello, my brother has a new pc (homebuild, no os) and after starting the system you get the Gigabytescreen where you can choose the bios. After choosing that you get in the bios and after 10 sec it reboots. After reboot you get the same sequence, but it reboots even sooner. The third time you get a black screen with something like " insert boot device" and then it also reboots and gets to the same black screen, but eventually it doesn't even get there anymore and at reboot the hdd makes ticking noises. At that time you can't shut the pc down with the on/off button. That only works when you wait and it starts up again. Then my brother shuts it down, because it doesn't sound healthy anymore. Clear cmos didn't help. Any ideas?
     
  2. TheKid7

    TheKid7 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2006
    Posts:
    3,469
    Check to see if there is a newer version of the BIOS available. If there is a newer version, I would Flash the BIOS to see if that fixes the issue.
     
  3. Feandur

    Feandur Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2005
    Posts:
    401
    Location:
    Australia
    - sounds like a failing / faulty HDD to me.

    Maybe replace the HDD and see how that goes?

    To me it seems to be looking for a boot device but not finding one - neither a HDD, or Optical drive, or even a USB drive. Check your cabling.

    If you manage to get into bios again, check the Boot Order Priority.

    Admittedly, if the priority is set to optical drive first it should check that, and if absent, proceed on to the next boot drive, and so on until it finds one.


    Let's say the HDD is faulty, and you manage to get into BIOS again and set the boot priority order to optical drive as the first boot device.

    I suggest getting a live Linux boot disk and booting into that. Then do a system check, such as on the HDD, etc.

    Now , as far as Linux systems go, a simple one is Parted magic, available for download as an ISO here....... http://www.calendarofupdates.com/updates/index.php?app=calendar

    http://www.calendarofupdates.com/updates/index.php?app=calendar&module=calendar&section=view&do=showevent&event_id=125802

    It is version 2013-08-01.

    Download the ISO, burn it as an image file to a CD, then try booting into it.

    Use it to check disk health, etc.

    -all I can suggest ATM.

    -cheers,
    feandur.
     
  4. mack_guy911

    mack_guy911 Registered Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2007
    Posts:
    2,677

    check your system with linux live cd

    use parted magic for example check ram hardware info.....etc

    http://www.technibble.com/forums/showthread.php?t=44181
     
  5. Get

    Get Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2009
    Posts:
    384
    Location:
    the Netherlands
    For now it's not possible to get his hands on a bios and there's only 1 newer version, but that's a beta and he doesn't want to take the risk) or linux cd (this is the only pc he has). Startup with hdd disconnected doesn't make a difference. He will try to boot from win 7 dvd. This doesn't solve the biosproblem I guess, but I guess that when this works the dvd, ram, cpu, psu and monitor are ok. Then it will be the MB I guess and he can get it replaced (no RMA, but instantly a new one).
     
  6. Baserk

    Baserk Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2008
    Posts:
    1,317
    Location:
    AmstelodamUM
    Running a linux live-dvd will not cause any (more) damage.
    It's just an easy way to assess what works and what not.
    The linux OS will only run in RAM memory until the next reboot. No data will be (over)written
    You'll have to be able to get in to the BIOS boot settings though and select either USB or DVD boot option.

    I'd completely disassemble the build and rebuild it again to exclude any build failure.
    If the same errors appear after rebuild, I'd swap the motherboard under guarantee for a new one as soon as possible, if only to exlude the system backbone as causing the issue.
    Bad mobos can drive moderate and decent folks into obscenity shouting, HULK tempered madmen.

    First always exclude all the fast, cheap and easy options/points of failure like CMOS battery, cables etc.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2013
  7. zapjb

    zapjb Registered Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2005
    Posts:
    3,518
    Location:
    USA - Back in a real State in time for a real Pres
    There is no risk with a Linux LiveCD.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2013
  8. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2007
    Posts:
    2,271
    Location:
    Nebraska, USA
    I agree and do so outside the case. Then double verify no extra standoffs were inserted under the motherboard.

    Note a ticking HD (while one sign of immanent HD failure) may also be a sign of a HD frantically looking for a boot sector. Since the HD comes into play AFTER the BIOS has completed POST, and this system is rebooting during the BIOS Setup Menu (which is BEFORE the system starts looking for boot drives) I would not suspect, or do anything to, the drive yet. Assembly errors is where to look first.
     
  9. sdmod

    sdmod Shadow Defender Expert

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2010
    Posts:
    780
    Yes I agree Feandur, this sounds like the hard disk drive is physically failing. Usually when this clicking starts it's only a short time before the drive fails completely.
    Sometimes Spinrite (Steve Gibson) can adjust the drive to give you some time to sort out your data to an alternative good disk but it's probably best to just retrieve any important data (if you can) then dump it and use another drive as they are quite cheap these days. In the times I've used Spinrite in these situations I've had only a few succeses and it can take a very long time to process a drive (days or longer sometimes) if at all.

     
  10. innerpeace

    innerpeace Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2007
    Posts:
    2,095
    Location:
    Mountaineer Country
    I also agree. Nothing wrong with re-connecting parts on the MB. On my first build I did this several times until I was happy with my wire management. If you do get into the BIOS double check your RAM voltages.

    Also, DO NOT consider flashing the BIOS until the system is stable. Otherwise your risk bricking the MB.

    You can also eliminate possible bad parts by starting with the bare minimum amount of hardware such as 1 stick of RAM, no dvd, no hdd or other accesories. If your cpu has onboard gpu you could even remove the discreet gpu.

    Double check your power supply connections. The cpu and often the gpu need connected to the power supply.

    Good luck
     
  11. Bill_Bright

    Bill_Bright Registered Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2007
    Posts:
    2,271
    Location:
    Nebraska, USA
    Good cable management is critical to ensure the absolute minimum impact on the desired front-to-back flow of cool air through the case. If using old style EIDE (PATA) drives, use round cables instead of flat ribbon cables. Many cases allow you to route cables behind the motherboard mounting plate. Thinner cases don't but you can typically stuff excess cables in unused drive bays, and tie them back, out of the air flow.

    Modular PSUs can help in a crowded case by using only the cables you need, but I personally am not a big fan of modular supplies. Even the best connections add resistance and are not sealed from contaminants. Unused connections collect dust, or can come loose. There is no industry standard for modular connection types (which means you must keep track of which extra cables go to which modular PSU - for years!). That leads to my last complaint and that is you then must store unused cables somewhere, potentially for many years too. So often, the spare cables end up in the bottom of the case interior so they don't get lost, or mixed up with other modular extras - which defeats much of the reason to get modular in the first place.

    So I buy (and recommend) good cases that provide good cable management, and hard-wired (not modular) PSUs.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.