Need Optimum partition and file location set up prior to Return IL installation

Discussion in 'Returnil releases' started by JustMyOpinion, Feb 17, 2009.

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  1. JustMyOpinion

    JustMyOpinion Registered Member

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    Hello. I am new to the forum and joined because of this focus on Return IL.
    I have read all documentation available with the Premium Version (the one I have), and prior to implementation, I am looking for any advice for the number of partitions that should be in place, and how data should be located within the partitions for an optimum install of Return IL.

    My machine is very close to a new install of WinXPPro, with almost all other software currently uninstalled, thereby allowing installs to be directed anywhere you recommend to achieve optimum operation of Return IL.

    I have Norton Partition Magic for creating new partitions, besides a 160gb drive on board my laptop, I also have an external USB drive with 1 terrabyte. It currently contains backup images of my on-board HD.

    I would appreciate any advice that you can provide including pointing me to other posts that may in themselves answer the questions about optimum configuration.

    Thank you!
     
  2. Coldmoon

    Coldmoon Returnil Moderator

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    Hello JustMyOpinion and welcome :)

    Some initial things to do:
    1) Make sure your system is clean
    2) Defrag your system partition (usually C:\ )

    This is not the correct way to think about using RVS. Returnil will operate optimally for its designed purpose if you perform the initial steps I mentioned above. What you need to do here is to determine how you can configure your programs to work efficiently with Returnil protection on...

    The basic issue is one where you want to save files and data. For files it is simply a matter of choosing a non-system partition (somewhere other than the c:\ drive. EX: not using "My Documents") as your save location. For data this becomes a little more involved and it would be better to investigate the program that creates that data first and then install it where it will work most efficiently with RVS.

    That is certainly enough room to work with and would suggest a simple setup first where you have two or three partitions. Something like:

    1) System (C:\ ) plus Data (D:\ ) - In this you would install your programs on the System drive as you would without RVS but configure these programs to save their data on the data drive.

    2) System (C:\ ) plus Data (D:\ ) alternative - In this you would not only save your data on the data drive D:\, but you would also install your programs on that same drive. This separates your system and program files.

    Both will result in some changes to your System however as these programs will at least need to make changes to your registry to run, but also may use the registry to save program changes and preferences (mobile applications being an exception here).

    I suggest you start slowly and get a feeling for how RVS works and then make the appropriate decision as to how to partition your HDD.

    Mike
     
  3. JustMyOpinion

    JustMyOpinion Registered Member

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    Mike, thank you for your prompt reply. One area that I see most problematic is "Documents and Settings" where many installed programs store information. On some programs (like Mozilla FF and Tbirdj) it is possible to modify the default store location but often needs to be modified again after a major upgrade is performed. On other programs it just isn't possible to change the default location.

    To that end, I discovered a 'how to' on Neowin Forums dated April 29, 2005 that describes how to move Documents and Settings to another partition making no permanent changes to Windows, Registry keys, nothing, and most surprising itworks!

    The result is any program that goes after Documents and Settings or any directory below it - directly - i.e., not using Windows services to get the data, wil result in 'directory or file not found'. If you use Windows Explorer and double click on C:\Documents and Settings it will open the partition that you mounted in place of the empty directory 'documents and settings'

    My question; any advantage to having Documents and Settings on a separate partition like this? And if so, would you consider it program 'data' or manage it like System

    I also haven't been able to totally assess if Documents and Settings are 'data' that must be able to change, or System Data of a bit of both.

    Ultimately I am also concerned about the open window of vulnerability that occurs when allowing system changes to be applied? I would like to get to a point where I do not need any Antivirus running in the background (only when I choose to run it).

    Thanks again

    Fred
     
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