mp3 to cd software

Discussion in 'other software & services' started by NGRhodes, Jul 19, 2007.

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  1. NGRhodes

    NGRhodes Registered Member

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    Does'nt have to be CD burning software (but must atleast create a burnable image), I currently use Nero 6.3 something, but wondered if there is actually anything better out there, ive used EAC in the past for ripping CD's, but does that do the reverse ?
     
  2. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Hello,

    Do you wish to restore the old quality (kind of lossless decompression)? Or do you merely wish to create audio CDs?

    Either way, I'd first look at K3B.

    http://k3b.org/

    On the site:

    Creating audio cds:

    * Pluggable audio decoding. Plugins for WAV, MP3, FLAC, and Ogg Vorbis are included.
    * CD-TEXT support. Will automagically be filled in from tags in audio files.
    * Write audio cds on-the-fly without decoding audio files to wav before.
    * Normalize volume levels before writing.
    * Cut audio tracks at the beginning and the end.

    Mrk
     
  3. HAN

    HAN Registered Member

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    Are you converting MP3 to WAV files? Or just wanting to make MP3 CDs?

    If you want to convert to WAV files and then burn to a CD, something like free Switch http://nch.com.au/switch/ can be used to convert the files and Windows Media Player can create the audio CD.

    If you want to create an MP3 CD, just burn it as a data CD. (Some MP3 CD players need the folders and songs to be numbered, like 001 - Pink Floyd, etc. so you may need to do that before you burn the disk. The bundled instruction manual of the player should give the specs for file setup.)
     
  4. WSFuser

    WSFuser Registered Member

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    Isnt k3b only for linux?...

    Anyways I currently use Nero and I think its fine for the job. Many other burnning programs (like Ashampoo Burning Studio) should be ok too.

    You can also try an app like Burrrn thats only for Audio CDs.
     
  5. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Hello,
    Yup, it's for Linux, but I know nickr is using Linux, so ... why not.
    Mrk
     
  6. NGRhodes

    NGRhodes Registered Member

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    Its to make audio cd's from mp3 so I can listen to them in my car.
    Currently using a mix of windows and linux :), unfortunatly my windows machine is the only one with a cd burner and I don't really want to dual boot it either, though I could use ubuntu live cd.
     
  7. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Hello,
    You could move files from one pc to another with USB key?
    Mrk
     
  8. Seer

    Seer Registered Member

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    Hello Mrk. :)

    From mp3 to lossless? And restored quality is greater than 320 kbps? This can be achieved? How?
    I thought it's impossible... :blink:
    Please explain... thanks.
     
  9. HAN

    HAN Registered Member

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  10. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Hello,
    Seer, if the Fourier coefficients (and gain) have been saved somewhere in the file, you can try to decompress. In theory it could work.
    Mrk
     
  11. Seer

    Seer Registered Member

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    They have been determined to sound the same, but technically they are not. This has been done due to fact that human ear is unable to tell the difference between the two. Audio CD uses 1440 kbps AFAIK, and in some cases 48 kHz, while the maximum for mp3 is 320 kbps. Lossless formats such as FLAC or APE use a bit less quality, say 800-900. As I am aware, once the ripped CD (wav file) is inflated to mp3, the bitrate of 1440 is lost forever, no deflation can get it back. I am not sure what are the limitations of AAC though...

    Cheers.

    EDIT: Thanks, Mrk, I was really not aware of that. I'll now look more into it... :)
     
  12. HAN

    HAN Registered Member

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    Seer: Hopefully you understood I was being sarcastic. :) I'm with you. There is a difference. (IMO, differences between low and high bitrates are clearly audible, but of course, not under all listening situations/conditions. One of which may indeed be a cell phone...)
     
  13. Seer

    Seer Registered Member

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    HAN,

    hello. :)

    I thought you were serious. :doubt: Sorry, my bad. I actually didn't open the link you provided at first, I was rather quick with response.

    Well, I took just a little snip from that link -

    I don't find this to be of much relevance. Technically, at least. But that's OK, for most "listeners", technicalities shouldn't be of much importance. mp3s (or AACs) are fine for casual daily listening...

    Regards. :)
     
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