Movies

Discussion in 'hardware' started by Yash Khan, Jun 28, 2014.

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  1. Yash Khan

    Yash Khan Registered Member

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    I have Full HD TV 1920*1080p 40 Inches.

    Is there a big quality difference between watching 1920*1080p & 1280*720p movie on 40 Inches TV for the naked eyes?
     
  2. Bob D

    Bob D Registered Member

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  3. guest

    guest Guest

    I don't watch videos/movies in 40" HDTV (or more likely, I can't afford one ;_; ), so my opinion might be not worthy, but most people seem to prefer to use video resolution the same as their device's screen resolution, although IMO upscaling 720p into 1080p screen shouldn't be noticeable. Then there's ppi (or dpi, these two terms are confusing!) and video bitrates to worry about.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 28, 2014
  4. treehouse786

    treehouse786 Registered Member

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    at the distance i view the tele at, 1080 is quite a bit better
     
  5. Yash Khan

    Yash Khan Registered Member

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    Most of the torrent movies are 1280*536/544, 1920*800/1040, etc...
    Any info why they are not 1280*720 & 1920*1080?

    Mostly 1080 movies are double in size than 720 movies.
    For my TV what would be good 1080 or 720?
     
  6. guest

    guest Guest

    Movies, especially Hollywood movies, have their own AR standards which are different from the commonly used AR in home video projects (16:9 and 4:3).
    More info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aspect_ratio_(image)

    If you want to play safe then go with the resolution that is the same with your device's display.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2014
  7. SirDrexl

    SirDrexl Registered Member

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    The "distributors" have cropped out the black bars. On Blu-ray, the movies are 1920x1080 regardless of the film's aspect ratio, with black bars to fill in empty space. Whoever encoded the torrent videos cropped out the black bars (to save space, maybe) as computer videos can be of any size. If you play one of them in a window, notice how it will be a very wide image (about 2.35:1 ratio) but have no black bars. When playing full screen, the media player fills in the empty space with black.
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2014
  8. Veeshush

    Veeshush Registered Member

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    The other thing people forget about is bitrate and sound quality. So some things on Blu-ray for instance are better quality and noticeable when compared to 720p. 4k resolution will be the norm in the next few years, then 8k. Screens over 30 inches will probably see the difference whenever the 4k/8k stuff becomes standard (cause of the number of pixels you can pack per screen size).

    Also see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Efficiency_Video_Coding
     
  9. Yash Khan

    Yash Khan Registered Member

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    What do you mean by play safe?

    I downloaded couple 720p & 1080p torrent movies to see the difference on my TV. I searched & found that someone named "YIFY" & his movies are famous on torrent for quality & small sizes. So I downloaded his movies.
    On my TV I didn't notice big difference between the quality of 720 & 1080 movies. Both were good quality & looked good on screen.
    So I think if the movies in question are torrent movies with small size then 720p is worth downloading as they are half in sizes compared to 1080p & the quality difference is not big.
    I also checked other torrents & found very big size 720/1080 movies but couldn't download & check due to my limited internet plan & speed.

    And torrent movies, some 720p movies may be better in quality than some 1080p movies as it depends on encoding, etc..., m I right?
     
  10. Veeshush

    Veeshush Registered Member

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    Exactly. Bitrate and codec play a huge role. Play around with a video editor and you'll find out quick.
     
  11. BoerenkoolMetWorst

    BoerenkoolMetWorst Registered Member

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    If you're using small files with low bitrate you indeed won't notice much difference between 720p and 1080p because the compression kills all the details that would be visible with 1080p. As a rule of thumb, for a 1080p video longer than 2 hours I recommend 10GB at the minimum for good quality.
    I think Microsoft had a promotional page for promoting HD content where you can download 1080p clips with high resolution but since they're short, their size is not that big.
     
  12. Yash Khan

    Yash Khan Registered Member

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    Can you give me a link of good quality 720p & 1080p video so that I can see the real quality & difference?
    But plzz give a small video size as I said internet plan & speed is limited.
     
  13. guest

    guest Guest

    If we were on Doom9 Forum right now then all of us in this thread would've been banned already. =V But anyway...

    Since your TV resolution is 1080p, then if you want to ensure the videos are going to play as what you intended set them in 1080p as well.

    But...

    The playback device might have a good upscalling. So even in 720p the difference should not be too noticeable, unless you happen to be a video elitist extremist. I don't watch videos on 40" HDTV, but even 480p looks acceptable for me in my computer screen. And as I said previously, there is your TV's ppi/dpi that also plays a role in viewing experience. Then also video bitrate with its size:quality balance. In short, whether if it's 720p or 1080p it shouldn't really matter much. The drawback of hard-upscalling is you might unnecessarily get bigger file size, especially if the TV is good at upscalling without messing around with the video files themselves. So you have 2 options:

    1. Encode all your 720p and below videos in 1080p, you'll get bigger file size which is inefficient overall, TV won't complain.
    2. Let the videos resolutions alone and just use the playback device's upscalling that doesn't modify the file whatsoever, if the TV isn't crappy at upscalling then it shouldn't be a problemo.

    Or just use CRF=20 and forget about the file size/bitrate calculation nightmare. =P
     
  14. Yash Khan

    Yash Khan Registered Member

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    Thanxx for the info.
    TV is good at upscaling. I tried 460p video of 400mb size & the quality was not affected.
    Learned few things here.
    Thanxx guys.

    What is CRF=20?
     
  15. guest

    guest Guest

    Oooh I've been waiting for this moment since long time ago. :D

    When determining the output quality of a video file, there are a few methods. One of them is constant rate factor/constant quality mode. With this, we don't need to think about how many bitrate value we need to use so a video file will look good (subjective of course). Most people recommend the value from 18 to 24, with bigger number means lower quality. The beauty of CRF mode is once you are happy with a value, say 20, then you don't need to worry about video bitrate anymore. If one video looks good with that value, all other videos will look good too (it's better to use a video footage with complex scene e.g. rapid fighting and overwhelming objects in a scene). Perhaps the bad thing of it is the output file size can't be calculated. In a nutshell:

    - Conventional bitrate mode --> final file size and bitrate are configurable, quality unknown.
    - Constant rate factor/constant quality mode --> final file size and bitrate are unknown, quality configurable.

    If the main goal is quality and file size is less of an issue, then CRF mode is the right path. If the main goal is final file size and quality is less of an issue, then conventional bitrate mode (ABR, ABR 2-pass, etc) is the right path.

    And yeah, I've been waiting for the right moment to preach CRF mode. Everyone who priors output quality needs to start using it IMO.
     
  16. Yash Khan

    Yash Khan Registered Member

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    Got it, thanxx.
     
  17. NGRhodes

    NGRhodes Registered Member

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    I have done back to back tests and I find the resolution used is less significant than the amount and type of compression used for smaller files. For big files that are closer to BluRay size than DVD size resolution becomes more significant.

    I've seen those yiffy rips at my friends house, the results are pretty good for the file size, I'd say the loss of quality is pretty much in proportion to the file size compared to my own rips (using Handbrake on default high profile settings which use CRF 20).
     
  18. NGRhodes

    NGRhodes Registered Member

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  19. Yash Khan

    Yash Khan Registered Member

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    This is my TV model
    http://www.samsung.com/us/support/owners/product/UN40EH5050FXZA

    Can anyone tell me if it supports external harddisk?
    Currently I watch movies with 32 GB USB directly connected to the TV.
    Can I watch with 1 TB external harddisk directly connected to the TV?

    I couldn't find the info in the support page.
     
  20. JRViejo

    JRViejo Global Moderator

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    HDDs are not supported. See FAQ How To Connect A USB Device, under Other Considerations.
     
  21. Yash Khan

    Yash Khan Registered Member

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    I tried my friends 250 GB external harddisk & it worked. I guess it was external harddisk (it was little bigger than 5 inch mobile phone). Do USB comes in 250 GB or bigger size?
     
  22. JRViejo

    JRViejo Global Moderator

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    256 GB USB Flash Drive is the biggest size that I know of.
     
  23. controler

    controler Guest

    "I downloaded couple 720p & 1080p torrent movies to see the difference on my TV. I searched & found that someone named "YIFY" & his movies are famous on torrent for quality & small sizes. So I downloaded his movies."

    I decided to go to YifyTV and check it out. It appears to be a site where you can watch streaming new movies.
    I noticed if I selected one another browser window would open in the background and I could not close it unless I did a CTL ALT DEL. Also get the popups about new flash player ect.
    If there a program that can stop this type action?

    I am running Win 8.1 64bit with apguard, Malwarbytes Pre, Zemana , MAlwarbytes antiexploit Pre.
     
  24. SirDrexl

    SirDrexl Registered Member

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    Well, it's not a "legitimate" site. It's like one of those gambling or porn sites that throw pop-ups at you constantly.

    I suppose you could try HTTPS Switchboard (if you use Chrome) or NoScript (if you use Firefox) and see about blocking some of the scripts. If you use IE, I don't know what you can do. Although I'd stay away from the site regardless of browser as it's just too risky.
     
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