Microsoft Releases 2012 Law Enforcement Requests Report

Discussion in 'privacy general' started by ronjor, Mar 21, 2013.

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  1. ronjor

    ronjor Global Moderator

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    http://blogs.technet.com/b/microsof...ses-2012-law-enforcement-requests-report.aspx
     
  2. funkydude

    funkydude Registered Member

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    One of the great things that Google do is the transparency report, it's great to see Microsoft following through.
     
  3. siljaline

    siljaline Former Poster

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  4. funkydude

    funkydude Registered Member

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    Are you asking a question with this? If so, it's both... MS is being transparent over government requests for data.
     
  5. TheWindBringeth

    TheWindBringeth Registered Member

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    I think if Microsoft (and others) were really interested in transparency, they would provide more information about exactly what was disclosed. What is "non-content" data for example? Would that include a list of all directory file names, their file creation/modification/access dates, and client IP Address information for accesses to cloud storage? A list of all names, email addresses, or other contact information for those you've communicated with along with timestamps and other meta data about the communications? What about browsing history (URLs)? Search engine usage? The higher level activity/behavior profile information that Microsoft generates from all the stuff they datamine (which might be nearly as revealing as the lower level transactional details)?

    I don't think National Security Letters fall into either the "a valid subpoena or legal equivalent" or "a court order or warrant" category. The recent decision that the gag order on disclosing whether or not a NSL was received is unconstitutional was stayed for awhile. So I would think these statistics do not include those figures. Which of course should be spelled out via "these statistics wouldn't include numbers for requests we are legally prevented from discussing, if we had received any such requests" type disclosure.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2013
  6. siljaline

    siljaline Former Poster

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  7. TheWindBringeth

    TheWindBringeth Registered Member

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  8. sepihi

    sepihi Registered Member

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    I find it ironic that the PDF was generated with Adobe InDesign 6 for a Mac!

    ;-)
     
  9. sepihi

    sepihi Registered Member

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    I find the report pretty much useless. Little to be gleaned from it other than useless counts by country.
     
  10. DesuMaiden

    DesuMaiden Registered Member

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    Microsoft discloses everything YOU do on your computer to the police. **** you Bill Gates.
     
  11. Mman79

    Mman79 Registered Member

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    Now I understand why you made your threads in the privacy sections. You're completely misinformed or simply trying to spread FUD. There are enough real privacy and security concerns to deal with without making up more. Let me put it to you short and sweet, if MS could disclose everything you do on your computer to LEA, then why bother getting warrants to search a system? Why use forensics tools? Why don't I have a keylogger or a trojan phoning home or sending data out from my Windows system? It has to get to MS somehow for your theory to work. Gandalf isn't employed by Redmond last I spoke with a friend who does work for MS.

    The closest they can come to knowing everything you do is through the use of their services like Outlook.com or Skydrive, and probably Skype now that they own it. Any vendor has access to data that you send to/from and store on their servers. That's a far cry from your claim.

    Anyway, no, there isn't much to see in these transparency reports, but there isn't much in the ones Google publishes either. You're not going to get the nitty-gritty out of either company, ever.
     
  12. happyyarou666

    happyyarou666 Registered Member

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    +1 this, its ok we all overreact sometimes , lols
     
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