Medical Records May Soon Go Online

Discussion in 'privacy general' started by luv2bsecure, Aug 23, 2004.

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  1. luv2bsecure

    luv2bsecure Infrequent Poster

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    There's no question that immediate access to your medical history by medical personnel could be life-saving. But, with every advance, comes the ever-increasing loss of personal privacy. This is an interesting article from PC World that looks at both sides:

    It's five in the morning. You're in a hotel room having a serious allergic reaction to something you ate. Do you know where your medical records are?

    If you're like most Americans, they're resting peacefully in a manila folder at your doctor's office. And the writing inside looks something like Sanskrit.

    Someday, that information could be only a modem away--or closer, perhaps in a keychain drive in your luggage. The Bush administration has released a strategic plan for every U.S. citizen's health information to be stored in an "electronic health record" central database within ten years. Each person would have a "personal health record," an electronic file the individual would manage, that could exchange information with the EHR database.

    The PHR would contain information on a person's insurance plan, prescriptions, allergies, medical history, and conditions such as asthma or diabetes.


    The rest of the article is here:
    http://www.pcworld.com/resource/printable/article/0,aid,117479,00.asp

    It's a whole new world.

    John
    Luv2BSecure

    .
     
  2. Rita

    Rita Infrequent Poster

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    good evening luv2BSecure
    how do you feel about this?good idea or not?
    rita
     
  3. GlobalForce

    GlobalForce Regular Poster

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    With more and more households becomming "activated" with home pc's, the publics newfound discovery of the web and the ease of which information can be accessed should be reason enough to participate.

    Hi John/l2b :),
    I must say, I found this article very interesting. It's a big part of what's happening with the evolution of our world, the direction of the web and the issues we must address. Individual participation is paramount.
    I like the idea of taking a peek at my medical records, for reference, or to verify my history once in a while (while I still have a memory ~laughing~).Tell me, are there many people who wouldn't want to be involved in say, a surgical procedure, namely their own! I don't favor hospitals as it is, a good chance of saying bye-bye there (though this ultimately, does not matter), No Thanks.

    Concerning the Privacy Factor,
    "H U G E Concerns", and one's that advocacy groups, health care IT vendors, and private sectors will need to focus on.
    The idea that vital information could be tampered with, or re-entered under your name, then drawn upon by doctors is just
    a bit frightening. That's why a visit ever so often to proof that info would be a good idea to stay involved (you think?).
    I have "NO DOUBT" these passages are true in cutting down on human error.

    In summary: Are you willing to embrace the PHR, knowing the road to change will not be smooth, or are you going to think to yourself next time, while you lie in a hospital bed somewhere in Sticksville,

    "Do The Doctors Have The Vital Information They Need To Make The Best Choice For Me?"

    What's Your Opinion?​


    GF
     
  4. ronjor

    ronjor Global Moderator

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    I remember some years ago Social Security info was easily obtained on a .gov website in the U.S. That didn't fly.

    Computers are not now and may never be, safe enough to store sensitive info.
     
  5. GlobalForce

    GlobalForce Regular Poster

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    This works for me. :D
    GF
     
  6. ronjor

    ronjor Global Moderator

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    The hard drive will be replaced by something similar in my opinion. The sooner the better. :D
     
  7. GlobalForce

    GlobalForce Regular Poster

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    I agree the wheels of technology are in motion. Hardrive evolution...The sooner the better.

    GF ;)
     
  8. The_Usernameless_H

    The_Usernameless_H Registered Member

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    I wouldn't trust the government's 'privacy measures' for a second. They'll put up bidding for a company to handle online security, and go for a bunch of crooks who put in the cheapest bid, getting software that makes Swiss Cheese look positively homogenous.
     
  9. Cochise

    Cochise A missed friend

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    There would be no guarantee that having access to your medical records at the touch of a button would maybe save your life....information stored might not be correct in every detail and so could cause more harm than good....I have personal proof of that scenario..... ;) :p

    But the big advantage I see in the project would be to get in on the ground floor.....Flogging everyone's medical history to insurers and the like would be something like having a licence to print your own money.....don't you think? :D :D :D ......


    Cochise, :cool:
     
  10. Longboard

    Longboard Registered Member

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    Hello. Very astute observation Cochise.

    Very interesting thread. Major implications for the wider community. The image of an injured person unable to supply relevant records is a powerful one. A proper health record can absolutely make a difference to diagnosis and treatment.

    The downside is a staggering vulnerability. The data base would be enormous. Who would run it? Who would have access and to what. Insurers would give eye teeth to know information to subdivide risk categories and realistically actively discriminate against potential high risk individuals, particularly in a private based system, as opposed to nationalised health services. We all know how hard it is to protect against identity theft already.

    What if some one enters your record and by mistake or even maliciously labels one as HIV+, or having a genetic defect that would render you unable to work in 3-4 years? How about some faking a "Do not resucitate order' on your records, just for fun?

    If gifted tenagers can hack banks and set loose web threatening worms how secure would your most personal information be?

    We already deeply resent the free passing around of even simple mailing lists and unsolicited advertising. (at least I do)

    Info for sale!!!

    My own hospital based e-mail system has already been hacked several times for spamming purposes and used as adistibution for netsky virus.

    How about access to the records of some-one who may have had several pregnancy terminations. Who might come calling?

    Genetic diagnosis and labelling with active discrimination is already a major source of concern.

    One of the greatest concerns for all hospital based and private medical services is confidentiality. There has been massive efforts made in the last decade to shore up every aspect of same.

    Do you really want to give this up?

    I know this is perhaps slightly melodramatic but the scenarios are real. I would fully support the storage of records with some personal device but dont give up too much just yet.

    Cheers.
     
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