LuckyBackup: Marriage between rsync and a great gui

Discussion in 'all things UNIX' started by apathy, Jul 3, 2010.

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  1. apathy

    apathy Registered Member

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    Back in Time has been my backup solution for a while now and I've been happy with it. I reinstalled my Linux box and since I heard so much about Luckybackup on WebUpd8 and other sites I'd give a go.

    It ran like a champ with easy scheduling setup and a good logging system. I'll have to test the snapshot system but I may abandon Back in time for this as LuckyBackup is actively developed and it works well with rsync. Between SpiderOak and LuckyBackup I'll sleep at night knowing my files are safely stored.

    Here are the features:

    1. Backup
    Stop avoiding backing-up. You now have no excuses !!

    Create a "clone" of your data at another location in no time, safely.

    Backup any directory (source) to another (destination).

    luckyBackup copies over only the changes you've made to the source directory and nothing more.
    You will be surprised when your huge source is backed up in seconds (after the first time !!).

    Whatever changes you make to the source including adding, moving, deleting, modifying files / directories etc, will have the same effect to the destination.

    Owner, group, time stamps, links and permissions of files are preserved (unless stated otherwise).

    2. Snapshots
    Create multiple backup "snapshots".

    Each snapshot is an image of the source data that refers to a specific date-time.

    Rolling back to any of the snapshots is possible.

    3. Sync
    Sync any directories keeping the files that were most recently modified on both of them.

    Useful if you modify files on more than one PCs (using a flash-drive and don't want to bother remembering what did you use last.

    4. Keep your data safe
    luckyBackup first checks whether the directories you've declared exist or if they are empty and warns you accordingly.

    You wouldn't want your 500GB music collection backup (that took half a day to create !!) vanish in a second if you forgot to mount the external drive that your source is in !!
    You also wouldn't want to execute an rsync command if your destination folder is in an external drive that you also forgot to mount.

    5. Simple / advanced option
    The add/modify operation dialog is quite simple and everybody can use it with confidence.
    Hit on the "advanced" pushbutton at the operation properties window and a whole bunch of other options will appear.
    If you know what you're doing change anything at will.

    6. Exclude option
    Exclude any file, folder or pattern from the transfer.
    You might not want to copy over backup files (*~), trash folders, system mount folders (/media & /mnt), some huge video files or anything else.

    7. Only include option
    Use this option to only transfer over specific file(s), folder(s) or pattern(s) within your source directory and nothing else.

    8. Add/remove any rsync option
    If you don't like the default rsync options that luckybackup uses, add or remove any option you wish.

    9. Remote connections
    Remote connections are possible, either for use as a source or as a destination.

    10. Also execute
    You can execute any command(s) before or after a specific task.

    11. Restore operation
    Everybody wishes to never use this !!
    But when this time comes, luckyBackup gives you the option to create an operation based on an existing one for restore purposes or use a wizard style procedure that will guide you through.

    12. Simulation option
    If you are unsure of the effects on your data when executing an rsync command try the dry-run option. luckyBackup will perform a trial run that doesn't make any changes (and produces mostly the same output as a real run).
    Note: The progress-bar might be misleading when using this.

    13. Include option – Execution order
    A separate check-box can be used to include or not the operations within a profile.

    The option to change the execution order of operation is also given.

    14. Profiles
    You don't have to create all operations from scratch every time you start luckyBackup. You can save your preferences in a .profile file and load it whenever needed. Use as many profiles as you like.

    15. Scheduling

    Scheduling for execution of already created profiles via cronjobs is supported.

    16. Logfile
    After each operation a logfile is created in your home folder. You can have a look at it any time you want.

    17. Command line mode
    luckyBackup can run in command line if you wish not to use the gui, but you have to first create the profile that is going to be executed.
    Type "luckybackup --help" at a terminal to see usage and supported options.
     
  2. apathy

    apathy Registered Member

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    Wow no comments eh? Anyways I love the snapshot system.

    "Each snapshot is an image of the source data that refers to a specific date-time."

    I chose to have two snapshots along with my regular daily backup, so if anything goes wrong I can go back a day or two and restore. I absolutely love this program.
     
  3. Ocky

    Ocky Registered Member

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    Sounds good, may have a look. Lack of comments probably just apathy. :argh:
     
  4. apathy

    apathy Registered Member

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    That just hurts, :'(
     
  5. Ocky

    Ocky Registered Member

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    Apologies apathy, rest assured that I do value your posts very much. I have noticed that the Unix forum is not receiving it's usual quota of posts this past week for some or other reason.
    Could you post a screenie of the GUI for a quick overview ?

    Regards
     
  6. apathy

    apathy Registered Member

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    No doubt, Unix users need love too.
    Here is a nice video -http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L5au2q4Solo&feature=player_embedded- of it in action:

    Between Lucky Backup or Back in time you are good to go.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 5, 2010
  7. colinp

    colinp Registered Member

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    Just tried it, and I must say it is alot faster (at least it seems so) than grsync. However, I am on a newer computer at the moment than my old desktop, so it may not be too fair a comparison. I will try it on that as well.

    Colin
     
  8. mack_guy911

    mack_guy911 Registered Member

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    very nice tutorial apathy :))
     
  9. phaedrus

    phaedrus Registered Member

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    LuckyBackup looks great. I`ll be giving it a go.

    Thanks for posting :)
     
  10. colinp

    colinp Registered Member

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    A quick question. I installed Lucky from the repositories and just noticed that I have an installation of Lucky as "super user" in system tools, and one as "colin" (me) in accessories.
    Now I never noticed the "colin" one and used the "super user" one and it backed up my own user home profile, that is completely accessible. So what is the difference as they both seem to back up my user home profile, or is it because that is what I chose to backup?
    I'm not too sure if I even understand what I'm trying to say.
    I guess, what can I do with the "super user" one that I can't do with the "user" one?

    Colin

    BTW, using lucid 10.04
     
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