Linux for beginner(s) - Q & A

Discussion in 'all things UNIX' started by korben, Dec 16, 2009.

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  1. korben

    korben Registered Member

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    [MOVE]Hello[/MOVE]
    Which version would you recommend to someone who likes the idea of linux but has never used it before?

    I have a x64 laptop now.

    Thank you for your suggestions

    If I start using it I will continue posting in this thread to keep it clean and clear :)
     
  2. wat0114

    wat0114 Guest

    My choices would be either PClinux or Mint. I'm using Mint for a few days only but I really like the look and feel of it. I think it's an excellent distro.
     
  3. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    I'd recommend any one of the following:
    Ubuntu, Linux Mint, openSUSE

    If you want easy support, then Ubuntu.
    If you want everything to work out the box, Mint.
    If you want a rock-steady professional distro, openSUSE.

    Mrk
     
  4. chronomatic

    chronomatic Registered Member

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    Ubuntu because it's the most widely used distro out there and the documentation is extensive and the support is very easy to come by.
     
  5. andb

    andb Registered Member

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    It's true... But wouldn't Linux Mint be better then? I mean it's everything you just described + everything (media, flash, java etc...) working out of the box. The documentation and support in the forums for ubuntu works with mint too. Just thinking if we talking a 1st-time-evah-distro maybe it should be one where everything just works.
     
  6. korben

    korben Registered Member

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    Saw a few clips/ docs with MINT as the star of the preentations and need to say I'm into it. Do not have enough time to try it out but cannot stop thinking about it...

    Now, assuming I want to install MINT -> where to look for it? the main site is the trustworthy one? I don't know what soure should be used...as I pinpointed I truly am a beginner in the field smile
     
  7. wat0114

    wat0114 Guest

  8. Beavenburt

    Beavenburt Registered Member

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    I've been running Mepis on my desktop for over a month now and I think it's fantastic. Flawless for me in fact. I haven't got a bad word to say about it. Plus, it's by far the friendliest community that i've come across. They have a 64 bit version, it might be worth a shot. I'm not sure on Mepis' reputation for running on laptops and hardware recognition, but it's a dream on my desktop.
     
  9. Eice

    Eice Registered Member

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    Out of curiosity: other than pre-installed codecs and the one-month lag behind each new Ubuntu release, what does Mint bring to the table compared to Ubuntu?
     
  10. andb

    andb Registered Member

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    Maybe iam not the right person to answer since i never used mint :D But i think they also have custom tools, they at least have a better start menu then ubuntu.

    I think for a absolutely new user it is a nice touch that everything works ootb, thats the only reason i recomend mint. After a while the user might switch to ubuntu or better yet, another distro completely. Maybe mandriva, not a fan but everything also works there.
     
  11. korben

    korben Registered Member

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    Another one:

    Partitions:

    C: win 7
    D: files

    Where to install it to ensure double boot?
     
  12. phaedrus

    phaedrus Registered Member

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    A dedicated install of Linux needs its own separate partition. The Linux installer will launch a partitioner which will give you the option of repartitioning your current setup.

    You might want to try WUBI which is a special installer that can install Ubuntu inside Windows. Its a good way of trying Linux without repartitioning your drive and can easily be removed from Windows add/remove programs.

    I recommend you have a look at Mrkvonics` excellent guide to installing Ubuntu here:
    http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/ubuntu-install.html
     
  13. mack_guy911

    mack_guy911 Registered Member

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    i suggest you to try mint linux or pclinux 32 bit run it from live cd without install which you find more comfortable try that one :))
     
  14. korben

    korben Registered Member

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    Wonderful, guys, this is very valuable info.

    Anything else you'l like to add to the basket of ideas for beginners?
     
  15. Eice

    Eice Registered Member

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    Well, I decided to give it a test drive myself, and all I have to say is: it's the first time that I've ever entertained the possibility of ditching Windows entirely.

    An absolutely awesome distro. I should never have waited so long to try it out.
     
  16. korben

    korben Registered Member

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    Might sound ridiculous..oh well...

    downloaded several linux .iso images that weigh ca 700MB, can they be burnt onto DVDs?
     
  17. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Sure why not, but it's a waste of space ...
    Mrk
     
  18. korben

    korben Registered Member

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    burn with lowest / highest possible speed?

    you're a tad bit slim :D
     
  19. GlobalForce

    GlobalForce Regular Poster

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    Maybe I was a wee bit impatient - my bad. Split the uprights speed-wise unless you know your burners capable.
     
  20. Longboard

    Longboard Registered Member

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    Korben
    How good are you ? How keen are you ?? :)
    What specs on your box?
    Youre obviously interested and seem to be up to speed.

    The "Live CD" option is a good one..

    Look here @ Wubi if you want to have a trial..works well and very simple to set-up, prolly (really :D ) the easiest option for initial experience: no issues with multi boot or partitioning: easy to uninstall cleanly..
    http://wubi-installer.org/
    0_o... oops already posted, ..so there you go..

    Have you been virtualised ?? ;)
    If you want to have a run with several distros check out VMware Player or Virtual box you will expand your horizons, both free..also easy to set-up.
    Install your Linux as a VM.
    Can install directly from the .iso file you have into the VM.
    Mrk's intro is a good start:
    http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/virtualization.html

    If youve got the sponduliks, get VMWare Workstation: never regretted it here. :D
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2010
  21. korben

    korben Registered Member

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    Longboard, mate, appreciate the human touch! :D

    My linux distros are coming in today as I write [due to the limitations of my net speed my friend's bringing them for me]
    Yup, already took interst in WUBI + MobaLiveCD_v2.1 although not yet got round to the ins and outs of using either of the two wink
    VirtualBox-3.1.2-56127-Win on my HD resides and is ready for the take-off

    Good day to good guides out there!!
     
  22. korben

    korben Registered Member

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    So... I've got some distros with me..next to me to be more precise...and thinking about the actual install process...

    When I manage to install, say, Mint - can I start surfing the net instantly or do I need some protection?
     
  23. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    You already have the protection you need:

    You have a firewall, you have limited account, you have a number of other under-the-hood hardening elements in place, working for you. Your machine is better secured than a default Windows one. It's boring. And it's good. Enjoy.

    Mrk
     
  24. Longboard

    Longboard Registered Member

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    'lo Korben

    Short answer: (-remember I am low-end user-) Good to go. :)
    ( heh, might depend on who you are surfing with :blink: )
    Read some of the Mint install reviews for familiarisation with Mint Tools , Mint Update and Synaptic.

    Longer answer:
    Some considerations:
    -where are you installing ??: vm or primary??, multiboot ??
    Behind a router ??

    Important: Use Synaptic to check for any security updates and updates in general.

    Obviously Firefox with some add-ons: No script, Customize google, Abblock Plus etc

    Simple firewall perhaps to start: Firestarter.
    ( cant recall if Mint has any other native Firewalls )

    If you feel strongly about it:
    http://www.linuxmint.com/wiki/index.php/Securit
    ( see comment below re e-mail and file sharing)

    Create a user, use ( in fact do not use ) a root account.

    Effectively in my limited experience, behind a router with basic precautions..to my knowledge..I've never had an issue.

    Behind a router and in a VM as required; I've been "indiscriminate" in my browsing at times..:blink:

    There are some known Linux mals and recent malicious installs cf:
    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=260188
    but this was a minor hack: found and sorted quickly.

    There are always potential issues with wireless and bluetooth

    "Rootkit" was coined for Unix systems
    Have a look here:
    http://www.chkrootkit.org/
    http://rkhunter.sourceforge.net/

    Here's a tidbit: http://blogs.iium.edu.my/jaiz/2008/09/23/10-best-hacking-and-security-software-tools-for-linux/
    ( lol: has a link to Mint install review too)

    I think with basic precautions, you are fine.
    Cant actually find anyone here (@wilders) who has had issue with Malware in Linux. :cool:

    If you are forwarding mail or files to Windows users: it behooves you to run some sort of scanner to protect them: just manners ya know. ;)

    Sorry, that started out as short answer and got a bit carried away with itself :oops:

    Wait for a couple of -high end users- to comment :)
    If a doofus cest moi cant screw up my system: you should be fine.
    Have fun.
    Regards
     
  25. korben

    korben Registered Member

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    Mrkvonic, Longboard - you are cool boys in this town of L.
    uhm, can one of you drop by tonight and install the distros one by one and teach me how to do it properly and show how to work with them? Will be grateful.

    yup, a joke this was. nonetheless gonna give it a try
    yet wish there was someone how could teach me how to do it w/o the necessity to visit loads of forums, reading and trying to grasp the knowledge on my own.

    Longboard,say hello to my uncle in Sydney mate!
     
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