Licence Agreement..question

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by broderp, Mar 31, 2007.

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  1. broderp

    broderp Registered Member

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    I am wondering about the the licence agreement as it pertains to multiple computers.

    Will acronis allow me to create an image on a dual layer DVD (or single layer) that I can boot up and restore my system....even if I change the size of the hard drive and /or the hardware config?


    I think from what I read it can, but the real issue is can I INSTALL the program on just ONE computer (meet the licence agreement) and use the dvd to restore several other PC's?

    I have 7 PC's on my home network and can't afford to buy 7 copies/ licences, but have the need to restore several PC's at random times as they get messed up (either through viruses or corrupt files from programming etc....)

    Can I use the one image, keep it up to date and use it to restore several different PC's via a DVD Disc or partition??

    I want to keep it all on the up and up, but find this a gray area possibly. can it be done? It it legal?
     
  2. TheQuest

    TheQuest Registered Member

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    Hi, broderp

    Is the HAL the same [which I doubt]] on all the PC's? If not, you would need some thing like Snap Deploy [Acronis product] or Sysprep.exe [Windows free tool], the other choice you would have is at less to do a Repair Install to get them to boot.

    Also the the SID would be the same on all the PC's which they should not be.
    I think it depends on what version you would be using, best to ask Support.

    Take Care,
    TheQuest :cool:
     
  3. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

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    You are asking a moral question.

    TrueImage will install on and image all of your computers. The license says that one copy is approved only to install and image one computer. You say you can't afford 7 copies, but you can afford 7 computers.

    Blue Beard had the same dilema: to be a pirate or not to be a pirate, to be a pirate or not to be a pirate? Life it tough. There are no easy answers. Look deep inside. Consult your spiritual leader. Talk to a lawyer. Sell one computer and buy five more copies of TrueImage. Decisions, decisions. :)
     
  4. TheQuest

    TheQuest Registered Member

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    Hi, jmk94903

    :D :D :thumb:

    Take Care,
    TheQuest :cool:
     
  5. broderp

    broderp Registered Member

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    I am lucky to work for a company that changes PC's at a fairly short interval as well as a pretty awesome employee purchace program.

    Example, I can purchace a "used" PC that I used for the last year for the "super high" price of $25. :eek: (These are Dell Optiplex systems) and our employee software agrement lets me buy the newest programs, like OFFICE 2007 ENTERPRISE EDITION for $20 (Yes $20 for the FULL version on an OEM disk.)

    So it's not like I spend a ton of money on PC's I just don't sell them. I agree to not sell them for a profit (wich I definately could) in return for the overly fair price for a 1-2 year old PC. I have made 2-3 PC's such as my HTPC that did cost me over $1500.00, but not all at one time over the last 5-6 years. Currently I only have 5 on my network, and three older WINDOW 95 systems on a shelf.

    So yes I "get" the moral dilema as you stated, but it's not like I blow tons of money on this stuff.

    I was thinking the "server" version for $80 may be a better idea, but it loses the wizard mode, which I like and need. (I'm a hardware guy, not a software guy.)

    And for the record, I have a OEM licences for windows XP for EVERY PC I own (Including the original OEM discs and Dell OEM discs), but HATE the sometimes full day of doing UPGRADES when I need to format the hard drive, since some are "OLD" Pre SP2 versions.

    So it's not a moral dilema, just more like a "loophole":rolleyes: that I'm looking at.

    I just "upgraded" the hard drive on my ASUS TERMINATOR PC, and spent over 7 hours doing windows updates. YUCK. ANd this PC is only for STORAGE and internet access!!:blink:

    Maybe I could just install it on one PC, create the backup discs and then un-install the software and put it on the next PC..etc...Hence keeping the licence agreement intact, leaving it on my most currently used and reformated PC in the end.
    :thumb: ??:thumbd: ??

    I just want to the right thing.

    Sorry so long, I just wanted to get my position on this straight.
     
  6. Acronis Support

    Acronis Support Acronis Support Staff

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  7. broderp

    broderp Registered Member

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    Understood, but according to the manual you reference, the instructions clearly tell me and I have tried with the demo version to back up to a network computer. I haven't tried to back up a network drive, but it appears that the software will allow me to do so.

    So if I install on ONE PC, and back up the others from it, I am still within the licence agreement....no?

    Either that or I can uninstall after I create a backup dvd of each system. This would be no different than if I were to sell or get rid of a PC, I have the software on just one PC. My backups are my own to store.

    Right?o_O

    I hate reading legal stuff, cause it confuses me.
     
  8. Chandler77

    Chandler77 Registered Member

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    I think that EULAS are unnecessarily restrictive when it comes to the individual home user. Do I realistically expect a software developer to actually come after me because I did not buy a second $20 dollar retail copy of their software and I just installed it on both my PC and laptop? If the industry was realistic and acknowledged the fact that the trend towards multiple computer ownership is not going to reverse itself, they would do limited home user licenses. And to add to the crazy, I just bought a new scanner and the EULA stated that I could install the software on only ONE computer. If they think I am going to buy a separate scanner for each of my computers...:rolleyes:
     
  9. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

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    I'm inclined to agree with you that the industry has not kept pace with the realities of how PC ownership has evolved.

    It is similar to the TV cable companies wanting more money for each set you had - perhaps made sense when the typical TV was worth a months pay and only the affluent would have a second one.

    However, the agreement is what it is and just because they aren't likely to come after you if you don't follow it doesn't make it legal.
     
  10. John2222

    John2222 Registered Member

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    You can't take image backups of other networked computers, only the computer that you have TI installed on. It has to run on the computer that is getting backed up.
     
  11. Chandler77

    Chandler77 Registered Member

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    "However, the agreement is what it is and just because they aren't likely to come after you if you don't follow it doesn't make it legal."

    Dear seekforever,

    You are absolutely correct.

    I place it in the same category as showing up to a parking meter, before you get a ticket but after the time has run out, jaywalking, and driving constantly five miles over the speeding limit. Automobiles and drivers, like EULA's, are multiple license endeavors where laws are constantly broken.

    I most enjoy the way an Acronis Moderator, above in this thread, points to the EULA as a self revealing document. I had to reinstall a crashed hard drive, and all the programs on it, this past weekend. EULA's are to be agreed to. End of story. I would not be surprised if one day somebody from Adobe showed up with a copy of a EULA and demanded my first born with proof that I had agreed as part of being graced to use Illustrator 10 years ago.

    In reality they don't amount to much.

    Let me see, have I violated my Windows 95 EULA recently?:isay:
     
  12. Peter2150

    Peter2150 Global Moderator

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    It's easy to take a lax attitude about this, but then don't be surprised when your favorite software, ends up having an onerous activation scheme which makes doing this impossible.
     
  13. Chandler77

    Chandler77 Registered Member

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    don't be surprised when your favorite software, ends up having an onerous activation scheme which makes doing this impossible.
    =========
    Peter 2150,
    I know of no unique program and only a few I cannot live without. One simply moves on to a vendor that meets the needs of the market/consumer. Most of my favorite programs are open source anyway.

    Now as for Achronis TI. Today I bought a regular retail copy.

    If it runs well I MIGHT buy another copy for my other machine. Both of them are rather completely synchronised so I could use one backup to restore either. No big deal.

    However, instead of 1) wasting my money on a duplicate progran I will use once a month, 2) having a vendor waste the time, energy, cost and waste of sending out another box with a disk for future land fill, wouldn't it be nicer if I could return to the website, enter my serial and add a liscense for, say $10 (on the hypothetical $20 program)? No production costs, no office costs, no wherehouse costs, just cash for the use of a product already posessed. Cost effective, eco-friendly and ethical. That I would do.

    Of course, changing the EULA to reflect the fact that a user buys a program for their computers would be much better.
     
  14. Peter2150

    Peter2150 Global Moderator

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    You are fortunate. Most the key programs I use for my small business are unique, not open source, and have activations schemes which can be a pain. Wonder why?
     
  15. broderp

    broderp Registered Member

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    Wow, sorry to spark a debate.

    I agree the licence agreement to be binding.

    But...My interpretation of the agreement is that I can only install it on ONE PC at a time.

    I found out last night that I can not (as posted earlier)back up any other drives than what the software is installed on. BUT I can back up to a Network Drive (and did) as well as restore from this drive as I did last night.
    I will now see if I can create a backup/boot disk that will allow me to point to the network drive, or store the contends on a dual layer DVD.

    Then, IMO, I should be OK to UNINSTALL the software, and reinstall it on another PC. If I have a crash or virus, I can always just use my backup dvd to restore.

    I could not find anything in the licence agreement that says this is illegal. (Either that or they need to make the EULA more readable to the layman.)

    I am also looking at version 9.1 WorkStation but I think that it's $80PER workstation, not $80 for the program to be able to back up an entire network. :doubt: So it's a long shot.

    I look at this like the copying of DVD'S /CD's. There is so much debate on that topic, but I will not let my kids "play" the OEM DVD of a Disney movie I paid $30 for, they get a COPY for thier DVD player. I am entitled to back it up, since I own it. I will not buy a second copy. Now if the industry allows me to exchange my dvd if damaged (it cost them pennies to mass produce them) or allow me to buy a second OEM disc at a heck of a steal, then I would.

    The same for software.

    my 2cents worth.:thumb: :thumbd: ?
     
  16. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

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    The install/uninstall issue is interesting but essentially you are saying that you are using a single copy to backup multiple PCs although you are subjecting yourself to a bit of inconvenience.

    If you make and use a backup DVD to restore the software using TI then you are using TI on that machine regardless of where the software is installed and this requires a license.

    You can backup your TI program in case the original gets lost or damaged you just can't use it on multiple machines.

    I agree that product activation is the result of illegal software usage and we are likely to see more of it, not less. However, as I said in an earlier post, the industry could probably increase their revenues by introducing "household" based licensing. I have no problems with commercial use costing more since the software is being used to make money and can also be a tax deduction.
     
  17. John2222

    John2222 Registered Member

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    You're confusing the word "install" with "use".
    Simple: If you plant to use it on 7 computers, you need 7 licenses.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2007
  18. broderp

    broderp Registered Member

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    I would agree with you, but it seems that it can be interpreted a few ways, as it is not specific enough to state or diffrentiate the terms "USE" vs "INSTALL".

    If I run it from a disc, it's not INSTALLED. It's on a DISC. This does not break the agreement.

    Being on a Disc, is different than from the hard drive. Running two instances of the program is not the same as running it one at a time.

    "END-USER LICENSE AGREEMENT
    2. The original purchaser can use the software on a single computer. You cannot use the software on more than a single machine, even if you own or lease all of them, without the written consent of Acronis."

    I will test the waters..I will email Acronis and see if I can get the "written consent" to use it on more than one machine. They must allow this or why would it be in the EULA? o_O

    I'm betting they will say no, and regular people like me will have to make a decision, to break the agreement, or to honor it. o_O I'd be willing to pay a small REASONABLE fee for each PC, say $15 each for the right, but not $50 a pop. Sorry. This I think is why people pirate. If the costs were more affordable, a lot would not.


    Bottom line, I may have to return he software, and look into other means of backing my software up.
     
  19. John2222

    John2222 Registered Member

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    I didn't see your word "install" in paragraph 2 of the EULA.

    I also didn't see any words about "run it" in the EULA, just the word "use".

    I also didn't see any reference as to where it is "run" from. Just the simple words "purchaser can use the software on a single computer".

    The EULA seems straightforward to me. Most vendors have discounts for multi-licenses, getting steeper with the number purchased.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2007
  20. broderp

    broderp Registered Member

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    I don't want to argue symantics with you, but the law usually rules in the favor of the consumer in cases where there is an unclear issue on a contract or agreement. :thumb: :thumbd:

    That has been my experience, but like I said, I will be looking at other alternatives to Acronis, or see if they will allow a varience. :doubt:
     
  21. QuiGonJohn

    QuiGonJohn Registered Member

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    Well as to your last statement, I can only really "use" it on 1 computer at a time, anyway.

    What about install on only 1, use Boot CD to BU/Rest on other PC's?
     
  22. Peter2150

    Peter2150 Global Moderator

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    If you have to ask you already know. The license say use. So if you use the boot CD on 2 machines you are in violation. Sure who will know. But consider this:

    1) In way you are depriving Acronis of revenue. Big deal right. But then don't complain when you don't get the support from them you feel you deserve, you aren't giving them the money they deserve.

    2) They aren't dumb. Eventually the will activate protect even the CD somehow, which will only make the whole thing harder to use. Then I suppose you would complain about that.

    Other company's have faced this, and now you not only have to activate, but if you uninstall and try and reinstall on the same machine you can't without calling them. Is this what you want, cause thats what you will get.
     
  23. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

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    It's interesting to see that some companies are starting to offer multiple licences for a nominal extra charge. Much to my surprise, Symantec with Norton Antivirus is one. The 3 PC license is a lot less than three times the price for one. PCTools offers Registry Machanic for $29.95 for one PC but for $9.95 more, you can install it on 3 PCs. Microsoft Office 2007 for Home and Student is licensed for 3 PCs.

    Let's hope that others get on this bandwagon. Offering a multiple system license which is a large discount from the full price for each will actually sell while offering nothing or just !0% off for the second copy, etc. promotes piracy among home users.
     
  24. QuiGonJohn

    QuiGonJohn Registered Member

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    Nobody wants to see Acronis institute such draconian measures that make it harder to use the program.

    That is why the relatively low cost home license would be the ideal thing. I think many people would be more honest about it if it were only say an extra $10 per extra machine.

    Slightly off-topic. Does ATI 9.0 work in Vista?
     
  25. shieber

    shieber Registered Member

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    It's not a question of keeping pace; it's a question of whether you are willing to buy the licnense they offer at the price they offer. You don't have to buy it if you don't think it's a good value for the money, but that doesn't mean you're allowed to steal. And that fact that folks have more than one PC doesn't mean they have to change their pricing so that you can use more copies for the same price. They could but htey don't have to. And you don't have to buy it if you think the price for multiple machines is too high for the value it affords you.

    Whether they can catch you stealing is another question, which is one reason why software is such a hard business and the big ones like MS and Symantec like to use verification software.

    sh

     
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