Lets say hard drive failure.

Discussion in 'FirstDefense-ISR Forum' started by divedog, Mar 18, 2007.

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  1. divedog

    divedog Registered Member

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    If I had no program like ATI. Could I install a new hard drive, install windows from the disk, install FDISR and use snapshots that I have archived on a second hard drive as a sort of system restore?
     
  2. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    I didn't try this in practice, but it sounds logical to me that this should work without problems.
    I already restored archived snapshots in new snapshots without problems and it doesn't matter where archived snapshots are stored (internal/external harddisks, CD, DVD, ...).
    Keep in mind that the folder for achives in the options of FDISR is correct or you won't see them in the main screen for copy/update.

    If I was you I would also archive the snapshot with only Windows + FDISR on it, it might be useful in the future.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2007
  3. Acadia

    Acadia Registered Member

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  4. Peter2150

    Peter2150 Global Moderator

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    As the folks said I've come close to simulating this,

    First let me describe my setup. I have a primary snapshot which is my full working c: drive. I also have a secondary snapshot, which is just a sripped down windows with AV and firewall. I have archives of both. I rarely update, the secondary snapshot or archive, but I update the primary archive very frequently. My standard use of FDISR is to update the primary archive before doing something, then if I want ro revert back, I boot to secondary, refresh primary from primary archive, and then boot back to primary.

    What I've done to answer your question is restore an image taken right after I got the system. Image just had c: drive with security software, and First Defense installed. No other snapshots. What I then did was create a secondary snapshot from the archive of secondary. Then booted to the secondary, and refreshed(copy/update) my primary from the archive. System was now current. No reason this wouldn't work if you say restored a factory recovery CD, and then installed FDISR.

    I would still recommend a good imaging program just because it is so much quicker.

    Pete
     
  5. Genady Prishnikov

    Genady Prishnikov Registered Member

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    Hi Pete,

    You really seem to know this imaging stuff. I have always used an imaging program, but what is the benefit of something like FDISR in addition to an imaging program? I've been interested in FDISR for a while, but honestly see duplication between this app and my imaging application. But, I'm probably missing something obvious.
     
  6. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    Genady Prishnikov,
    You don't really need FDISR, it's luxury and like any luxury, it's hard to give it up, once you have it.
    FDISR is in the first place an Immediate System Recovery and recovers your computer during reboot, when you are in trouble.
    Restoring an image takes alot more time than a simple reboot.
    The minimum is two snapshots = actual partition [C:] size x 2 which can be reduced by compression

    The rest of FDISR depends on your personal needs.
     
  7. Peter2150

    Peter2150 Global Moderator

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    Hi Genady

    First I have to tell you that the inspiration for my getting into the imaging stuff is our own Erik Albert. He really started me on the testing of images.

    But to answer your question. First it is layers, as in security. Secondly a time convenience. If I want to try something that I consider low to medium risk, that I might want to undo, first I update my primary archive. This literally takes me about a minute. Then if I do want to undo something, I just boot to my secondary and update the primary from the archive, and boot back to primary. Total time is about 5 minutes. So it is quicker than taking an image, test restoring it, and then maybe restoring it.

    But there is another big big reason I use both. I guess this fits in the layering concept. I have totally stopped bothering to verify images. My test of every image is to restore it. So the question that comes up is what happens if I try a restore and it fails. I've wiped my drive, and yikes the image fails. In that case I just restore an earlier image, which I have already confirmed restores, and then I can bring the drive current with the FDISR archive. Note, while I've never had a failure of restore with released versions of SP, I am beta testing it, and when you do that stuff can happen.

    Hope this all makes sense.

    Pete
     
  8. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    Peter,
    I assume that your primary snapshot contains your personal data as well and you also told us that you don't anchor anymore.

    So your secondary snapshot can't be used as a rollback snapshot anymore.
    I mean copy/update from secondary snapshot to primary snapshot isn't possible anymore

    Your rollback snapshot is in fact an archived snapshot that restores your primary snapshot.

    Am I right about this ?
     
  9. Peter2150

    Peter2150 Global Moderator

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    Yes. My primary snapshot is my c:\ drive. Only one partition one whole drive, no anchoring.

    Well updating from secondary to primary is possible, not not desirable. and yes in reality my real rollback snapshot is indeed the archive of the primary. 2 big advantages. First the actual copy time is much faster, and secondly, when FDISR initializes and does it's indexing, that is also twice as fast, as it doesn't index the archive.

    I've been doing this now for a couple of months and it has worked perfectly. Has the additional advantage of keeping images smaller.

    Pete
     
  10. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    That's what I was trying to say, instead of "not possible". It wouldn't be efficient, if you would do this.
    If you would do this accidently, you can still use your archived primary snapshot to recover the primary snapshot.

    And you need your secondary snapshot of course to recover your primary snapshot, because you can't use the active snapshot (primary) as a destination snapshot.
    OK thanks. :)

    P.S.: archived primary snapshot is stored on external harddisk ?
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2007
  11. Peter2150

    Peter2150 Global Moderator

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    Yes if done accidently the primary archive is there. Just a time inconvenience. I always setup the copy, and then take my hands off the keyboard and look carefully at what I am about to do. THen do it.

    archived primary is kept two places. Working copy on internal 2nd drive, and a "security" copy on external drive.

    Pete
     
  12. divedog

    divedog Registered Member

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    FDISR is probably the best piece of software I have ever bought. I will go as far as to say I will not even try Vista until FDISR works with vista, has anyone had any success with vista yet?
     
  13. ErikAlbert

    ErikAlbert Registered Member

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    You have to ask that question in the "FirstDefense-ISR BETA Forum".
    Not really a busy forum, but this forum handles the new version of FDISR, compatible with winVISTA, which is still in BETA. :D
     
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