Less known antiviruses

Discussion in 'other anti-virus software' started by Oximoronman, Oct 11, 2016.

  1. Oximoronman

    Oximoronman Registered Member

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    Did anyone try DWS Antivirus, Spentura antivirus,SkyShield av and Xana Evolution antivirus?
    What about detection rates?
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2016
  2. Circe

    Circe Registered Member

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  3. bellgamin

    bellgamin Very Frequent Poster

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    Virus Total results:
    SkyShield -- Per 4 AVs, SkyShield is infected (Avira, Gdata, Rising Aegis Lab). Probably a false positive BUT .......... :oops:

    DWS AV & Spentura are clean. If they don't require reboots during install, I will give them a run in Shadow Defender.

    RATS - DWS AV requires dotNet 4.0.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2016
  4. Tarantula

    Tarantula Registered Member

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  5. Joxx

    Joxx Registered Member

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  6. Tarantula

    Tarantula Registered Member

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    I'm trying it right now, alongside Zemana AM. Don't really care about the feedback.
     
  7. Tarantula

    Tarantula Registered Member

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  8. Sir Percy

    Sir Percy Registered Member

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    No they most certainly do not! They made a list of AV's supporting various versions of Windows if you for whatever reason do not wish to use Windows defender.
     
  9. bellgamin

    bellgamin Very Frequent Poster

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    As opposed to what? "they uncertainly do not"? Is it necessary to rebuff so vigorously?
     
  10. Sir Percy

    Sir Percy Registered Member

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    None other than saying that it is not an offer from MS. It is just a list of AV's if you do not want to use WD.
     
  11. Tarantula

    Tarantula Registered Member

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    I disagree. That link is provided by MS directly in my OS. When no AV is present there's a white flag in the tray. When I click on the white flag, there's a message: "find an antivirus program online (important)". When I click on that message, the above page opens up in the default browser. So yes, it IS offered by MS.
     
  12. ArchiveX

    ArchiveX Registered Member

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    Why using less known or unknown products in the first place? :confused:
     
  13. Oximoronman

    Oximoronman Registered Member

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    All of us tried all known antiviruses and clones based on their engines.So that become boring.Let's try something new and unknown
     
  14. Joxx

    Joxx Registered Member

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    yeah, let's try a rogue AV, that will be new...
     
  15. entropism

    entropism Registered Member

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    I don't find risking my identity, credit, personal details, and data to be "exciting". I go for as safe as possible. The internet is a Gypsy prostitute, and your antivirus is a condom. No need to poke holes in it to feel alive.

    This is the guy who was trying to find ways to install 6 year old, defunct antivirus programs, with no support or definition updates. I'm not taking anything seriously here.
     
  16. bellgamin

    bellgamin Very Frequent Poster

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    When I began accessing the internet, Kaspersky, Avira, Avast etc did not exist. By entropism's philosophy, they still wouldn't.

    Since I joined Wilders, I have noticed that some (NOT all) of the members provide valuable help in the testing of new security apps. Obviously they have the know-how such that they do so in a safe manner, using such as Sandboxie & Shadow Defender.

    It's good that posters such as entropy make it known that UNprotected use of security apps can be *dangerous* (of course, this is also true of ANY new app, not just those pertaining to security).

    I have always viewed Wilders as much more than a chat forum. New developers & security professionals often take an active role in Wilders. Some of them seek beta testers here, & value their helpful comments. Denigrating new or lesser-known apps, by making comments such as Joxx's "yeah, let's try a rogue AV, that will be new..." can discourage new security apps & approaches.
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2016
  17. bigc73542

    bigc73542 Retired Moderator

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  18. Joxx

    Joxx Registered Member

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    Pcmatic, the app I referred to, is not new (has been around at least from 2011) and is not "lesser-kown", it's known for having very negative feedback and I provided a link to it; only to be answered thus:
    ... not a very "helpful comment" is it ?

    as to you bellgamin, take your sugary patronising somewhere else, I find it nauseating.
     
  19. Tarantula

    Tarantula Registered Member

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    I mean that negative feedback can't stop me from testing the software.
     
  20. bellgamin

    bellgamin Very Frequent Poster

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    Hmm -- I meant it to be lemony. Shucks!
     
  21. roger_m

    roger_m Registered Member

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    I've used many lesser known antiviruses over the years. I've never actually felt that my system was particularly insecure when using antivirus software with unremarkable detection rates. I never reply on security software to keep me protected. I am careful about what software I let run on my computers, and along with keeping them updated, it means that the chance of me getting infected is very slim. I use antivirus as a secondary line of defense. For example, if I receive an email with a malicious attchment, it really doesn't matter if my antivirus detects it or not, as I don't open random email attachments, so the malware will never get a chance to execute.

    For the average user it certainly makes sense to use an antivirus with excellent detection rates. But, if you know what you're doing and are aware that a lesser known antivirus is not going to protect you as well, then I see no harm in trying one. Personally, I like to keep trying new software, and becuase of this, I find it hard to pick one antivirus and stay with it.
     
  22. entropism

    entropism Registered Member

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    What? That's absolutely not true. In fact, it's laughable. New companies can pop up all the time, and the ones that do well stick around. The ones that stick around get tested, show results, and encourage more people to try them out.

    Kaspersky, Avira, and Avast came out, got results that were TESTED, and THEN built a user following. They also came out so long ago, where virii weren't as prevalent that you COULD say "let's give it a shot!" But those days are over. I'll be damned if I trust some unknown POS company with no reputation, with no knowledge of how good, or even IF they work, to be installed on my systems. So yeah, this is an EASY pass for me. And should be for anyone who values their data. Let them stick around enough to be tested. Let them stick around enough to be proven. THEN I might say "I'll give it a shot". Might. Probably still won't, but at least it's not a 100% no.

    As for users here testing new programs? Yeah, they test new versions of established software. From trusted companies. Because only a moron would see "New SuperDuperAntivirus from RandomXYZ company!" on some random website, and think "Man, I should install that on my system!"

    So please, let's not making this into an argument of "Let's foster the little guys!" because it's not. It's about installing trusted software on your computer and not risking your info being stolen.
     
  23. bellgamin

    bellgamin Very Frequent Poster

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    My first AV, as I recall, was Dr Solomon. The only other *mainline* choices back then (c. early 1990s} were Norton & McAfee. McAfee acquired Dr Solomon in June 1998.

    As far as AV test results available to the general public, they largely were limited to sporadic articles in trade magazines -- possibly biased in favor of their major advertisers. I selected Dr Solomon based on an article in BYTE magazine. After McAfee swallowed Dr Solomon, I switched to a new AV from Germany called Anti-Virus Guard -- later shortened to AVG.

    I first learned of a new AV called A-squared here at Wilders. I bought it. I first heard of a new FW called Online Armor here at Wilders. I bought it. The Australian proponent of OA, and the originator of A-squared, frequently posted here at Wilders when their apps were in their infancy, and obtained valuable comments here at Wilders for improving their products. (A-squared, ANTS, & OA are among the foundations of what is now called Emsisoft).

    If one digs into the threads here at Wilders, including older threads "back when", it will be seen that many proponents of new security-apps (e.g., LnS, Voodoo, Crystal, ERP, MJ Registry Watcher, Private FW, DSA, etc) came to Wilders for testing and publicizing of their products.

    Be aware -- it costs money to be tested by the likes of AV-Comparatives and AV-test -- money which many start-ups & small outfits simply don't have. So some proponents turn to Wilders for obtaining constructive input from knowledgeable folks who will use lesser known apps, as well as apps in alpha or beta status. Yes, Wilders has fostered little guys & innovators in the past, & is still doing so.

    I am NOT a security expert. Instead I am a fan & admirer of the serious & well-qualified core that is the be-all & end-all of Wilders, in my view. Their careful critiques are helpful to proponents, and help neophytes (like me) to learn & grow. That is why I have despaired to see the gradual proliferation of catty commentary evolve here.
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2016
  24. entropism

    entropism Registered Member

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    OK, great. And as I previously stated, you were perfectly able to do that in the 90's. Malware was a rare occurrence, drive by infections didn't exist, and you could BASICALLY get away with not being infected by just not opening up strange files and looking for added file extensions like randomfile.jpg.exe.

    Now, you have ad servers injecting malicious code into perfectly normal (and trusted) websites. You have adware, malware, ransomware and virii all over the place.

    As reminiscent as you want to be, it was simply a different time back then, and cannot be replicated now. To believe so is ludicrous.

    As for testing on AV-C and AV-test, there are tons of legitimate, proven solutions that are NOT listed by them, who I would trust far more than these unknown AVs listed here.

    Your argument is flawed, because these AVs listed are not simply "new guys". They're unknowns that have:

    - Been around for a while and is completely dead (Skyshield - Last updated 2014, Xana Evolution - Last updated 2015)
    - Doesn't have a web presence outside of a Blogspot page (Spentura antivirus), and absolutely nothing written about it in English
    - An Antivirus (DWS) with absolutely zero presence outside of a facebook page, twitter and webpage, which happens to be rated with a warning by other antivirus' web protection extensions. They also are so desperate for attention, they're literally giving away their paid product on facebook, simply because they can't generate a userbase. They have 800 likes on facebook, after trying to be be funded on Kickstarter, with £24.00 pledged of their £2,000 goal.

    How can you even start a damn security company on £2,000?! Simple answer? You can't.

    So no, these are not "little guys we should support". They're abandonware at best, malware at worst. They're not innovators, they're failures.

    Edit - By the way, this is the profile for the developer of DWS Antivirus:



    Oh, lovely. Someone who has no formal education, or background in internet security, released an antivirus. He can't even write with proper grammar or spelling, and you trust him to code the wall between you and malware? Please.

    Edit #2 - From various digging, he seems to be in his late teens to early 20s. The DWS site was registered to "Discountworldstore.com" and their about page is... Hilarious at best.

    https://dwstechnology.co.uk/about-us/

    But yes, please tell us how this seems like a perfectly viable option.
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2016
  25. bellgamin

    bellgamin Very Frequent Poster

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    Actually, when it comes to trying new & possibly unsafe software, it's *safer* to do so now than it was then. Now sandboxes are readily available, as also are VM & (best of all) imaging.

    You just described 2 of the best white-hat hackers in the computer club attended by my grandson back on the mainland. Interestingly enough, both of them are splendid professional muscians with a symphony orchestra.

    I think it is rather sad when someone feels inclined to disparage another person's work because it is not well known, or is unpopular, or is unprofitable, or was put together by those they deem inferior to the task.
     
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