Kerio on New Computer?

Discussion in 'other firewalls' started by cpj, Jan 8, 2007.

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  1. cpj

    cpj Registered Member

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    I just ordered a new computer and my subscription to Kerio runs out in about a month, should I load Kerio onto to the new computer or go to something else? Comodo is what I had in mind. Kerio has worked for me on one machine, but takes a forced load to get it to load onto my new laptop. There seems to be nothing new coming out of Sunbelt (kind of disappointing). I have Kerio on 5 computers, all new installations last spring. I was using ZA until that went south and I was unable load updates. Was switching to Kerio a mistake? Three of these computers belong to non tech friends. One will not register, even though it is paid for and I have a key number. Should I change to something else as the licenses run out? If I change, is Comodo a good choice or what else is there? I run NOD32 for AV. It just sits there and does its thing, updating 2 or 3 times a day. Is there a firewall that will do the same thing?

    CPeter
     
  2. trickyricky

    trickyricky Registered Member

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    Firewalls don't continually need to be updated to fulfil their prime function, so I'm unsure what your issue with Kerio is. If there are no new versions appearing, might it just be that it's a mature product which needs very little further development? At least Sunbelt haven't started adding "features" to give an "enriched firewall experience" in the way that some other companies do. Sunbelt currently have a new version of Counterspy in late beta which is pretty revolutionary, so you can't really say they have nothing new coming out.

    If Kerio works on your new PC, then stick with it. If it misbehaves, then try Comodo. That's my advice, for what it's worth.
     
  3. KDNeese

    KDNeese Registered Member

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    I used Sunbelt Kerio (paid) for well over a year. My subscription ran out toward the end of December. I have replaced SKPF with the latest version of Comodo and do not regret it a bit. The latest release of SKPF ran close to 100MB on my machine, which is far, far too high, to say the least. Each newer version of Kerio seems to take more and more resources. On the other hand, the latest version of Comodo has been running at around 10-12MB, which is excellent. Of the current firewalls, only Look n' Stop runs lighter (of course, Kerio 2.1.5 and Jetico 1 ran a little lower, but they are a little older, yet still good firewalls). Comodo is as easy to use as SKPF; and in fact may be even a little more user friendly. SKPF has a few more features, such as web filtering, ad blocking, etc, but I have other apps that take care of those aspects, and which take up less resources combined than SKPF did. I also run NOD32, which runs very well with Comodo. In fact, the NOD kernel is using less memory since installing Comodo. It was running anywhere from 19-28MB with Kerio, and is now running around 15-18MB (this is with max NOD32 settings, anti-stealth enabled, etc). Another thing to consider is the security aspect. In firewall testing, Kerio was shut down rather easily, while Comodo performed the best. As far as I know Kerio doesn't have any form of self-protection, while Comodo does. In the end it's a matter of one's preference, but having used both, I would suggest at least trying Comodo and see how you like it. It is very user friendly and does a great job. :thumb:
     
  4. Ocky

    Ocky Registered Member

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    OK, but please say what you think of matousec's site comment on Comodo. See my post: https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showpost.php?p=919452&postcount=14
    I really don't know what to replace my Sygate with. Of course my Netgear ADSL router has a built in firewall, but I would feel more comfortable and secure with outbound protection. NOD32 will include a firewall with their next release (a suite), but who knows when. Should I skip the f/w and just use something like DSA or Cyberhawk. Prosecurity and SSM seem a bit daunting. :doubt:
     
  5. KDNeese

    KDNeese Registered Member

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    Personally, I take his comments with a grain of salt. I don't feel the design is superficial at all, but the fact is that no security app is invincible. There are bugs in any software that can be exploited under the right conditions and if a knowledgeable person searches long enough for flaws. We need to remember that this person's purpose is to find exploits, then turn around and sell the info to the companies that created the product, so he is critical of all the popular firewalls. For example:

    In reference to Zone Alarm Pro:

    In Reference to Sunbelt Kerio:

    In reference to Outpost Pro 4.0

    The same comments were made for the other firewalls he tested (Norton, BlackIce). Basically, if one goes by his reviews only, there are no other software firewalls left to use. My view is that any of the major firewalls are more than sufficient for Internet use under ordinary conditions. One consideration that is important to me is the amount of resources it takes to run the firewall. That is where the newest version of Sunbelt Kerio fails, as it had become a major resource hog, IMHO. Earlier versions of Comodo also used a lot of resources, but the latest release runs very light considering all that it does.

    Ocky, if you have a router, then any good software firewall that offers application control should be sufficient. One of the benefits of Comodo however, is that it allows application component verification and control. I personally believe Comodo combined with your router would be a very stout combination (not to mention NOD32, which beefs up your overall protection). At the same time, there really isn't any valid reason for you to switch from Sygate unless it is causing you problems.
     
  6. Ocky

    Ocky Registered Member

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    Thank you for your viewpoint. I agree that the comments re. the various firewalls are to be read in context. As I am 'attached' to Proxomitron and as Sygate has the loopback problem (meaning that outbound communications are not filtered), I will try Comodo. RC2 is out so I expect the final in a few days time. Your comments and software trials are much appreciated ! :thumb:
     
  7. Graystoke

    Graystoke Registered Member

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    I'm using Sunbelt Kerio 4.3, and have no problems with it loading. I ran it with NOD32 and now with KAV6. I think it's a very good firewall. Very easy to use.

    I gave Comodo a try, but had a problem with it. If I denied server rights to Firefox or IE7, I could not connect to the internet. As soon as I allowed server rights to those two apps, I could connect. I never could figure out how to deny server rights and connect to the internet.
     
  8. Ocky

    Ocky Registered Member

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    That's a very interesting observation. I know that with Sygate I have everything set to 'Act as Client' with no problems. Before downloading the upcoming final of Comodo and dumping Sygate, I would be interested to know whether browsers and other applications will be unable to connect unless server rights are allowed. If so, Kerio is probably another option. Whenever possible, server rights should not be allowed. What a hassle it is choosing a suitable firewall. o_O

    Edit: Hmm.. maybe this explains it - from Comodo Forums:

     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2007
  9. henryg

    henryg Registered Member

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    I also liked Kerio vs. Comodo. Kerio is capable of blocking a lot of useless ads and pop-ups.....Something that Comodo doesn't have.
     
  10. Graystoke

    Graystoke Registered Member

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    Ocky.....Thanks for adding that post from the Comodo forum. That helps a lot. I asked this question at their forum, but didn't get what I thought was a good enough answer. Maybe Little Mac wasn't there that day. :) My Kerio license is up in less than a month, maybe I give Comodo another try.
     
  11. cpj

    cpj Registered Member

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    I tried Comodo on two more computers, but can't seem to get the setup on my laptop configured correctly and so it can't get an IP address from the router. I have been fooling with it for sseveral days and finally loaded Kerio back on the laptop and now it works fine. I guess I will go with Kerio on the new machine, too. It now has Comodo, but I like to keepp everything the same as it makes life easier.

    CPeter
     
  12. DVD+R

    DVD+R Registered Member

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    Absolute Crap! :isay: Kerio Stands Highly in many reviews :cool:

    http://www.pcpro.co.uk/shopper/labs/89563/sunbelt-kerio-personal-firewall.html

    http://www.pcw.co.uk/vnunet/downloads/2128767/kerio-personal-firewall

    Kerio Have long been a Firewall Software Company,and Still operate only under a different name for their Personal Firewall, nothing else has changed in Many years :thumb:
     
  13. Jarmo P

    Jarmo P Registered Member

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    I cannot recommend either Kerio 4 or latest Comodo.
    A few comments.

    Kerio 4 is easy to use. There is no problems with making any kinds of software rules working. On the other hand it has BSOD's and excessive memory usage. And compared to stable kerio 2.1.5 the same features working well in the old firewall are not as functional with the sunbelt acquisited and developed version.

    Comodo is pretty stable. It does not use an overexcessive amount of memory.
    However, it is mainly an applications rules firewall. Anything that needs server access rights has to be made in a very backwards way. Many rules are just impossible to made with Comodo really tight. So it lacks deep in packet filtering department. Kerio 4's logging are prone to be not working meaning it is not logging all put to it. Comodo's log are nothing. There is nothing a user can learn from Comodo's logs.

    Of those 2 at the moment, I would recommend Comodo for newbies. It is much more simpler than Kerio 4. Not so many features and it is more stable too.

    The drawback Comodo has is that when one needs to make a rule like this:

    "The netphone service providing operator had told in their web page that firewall needs to allow both
    outgoing and incoming UDP connections for the whole port range for the remote IP ranges:
    62.142.14.0 - 62.142.14.128
    62.142.43.0 - 62.142.43.255".
    Those are very vaque and too wide instructions I know, but nevermind about that.

    It simply is not possible with Comodo without making compromises to security :rolleyes:
    One can make a network rule needed but for the phone application in question such restrictions are not possible to be made. The application rule needs to be allowed too much and when one has many other network rules like that specified (one can always scroll them after the final block rule but that not very convinient) it weakens packet filtering security.
    It is really awkward with Comodo.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2007
  14. JerryM

    JerryM Registered Member

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    I'm still using Kerio 2.1.5 with complete satisfaction. All I want a firewall to do is to permit or block traffic. My firewall does that, and I don't worry about updates, etc. My other firewall is LnS, and it has been a good one for several years also.

    I have an impression that some firewalls have expanded their roles into other areas, but I know little about them.

    Best,
    Jerry
     
  15. Zom17

    Zom17 Registered Member

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    I have the Kerio 4xxx version and from my own persobnal experience I fully agree with Jarmo P that it certainly has BSOD's. I have upgraded and I still get an occasional crash.

    I am looking for another forewall. To be fair, however, since having a router with Sunbelt's Kerio, NOD32, and Webroots' Spy Sweeper I haven't had one virus or spyware.
     
  16. cpj

    cpj Registered Member

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    That is the same set up I use and with good results, too.

    CPeter
     
  17. bugsy_pal

    bugsy_pal Registered Member

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    I too was using Kerio 4.3 and would get BSODs - this did not improve after its acquisition by Sunbelt. I am currently using the firewall in F-Secure and while I think it's pretty basci in its options, it seems to do the job and I don't get crashes.
     
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