Jap - Privacy software

Discussion in 'privacy technology' started by musicman, Nov 7, 2003.

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  1. musicman

    musicman Registered Member

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    Not sure if this has been posted in the past but I wanted to share this with the members especially about privacy on the net. I use Jap security software. its a proxy however with a twist. It runs thru 3 or four mixes which are encrypted then sent to the web site you access. Now the server that it access first is located in "Germany. They use one static ip..which at one time there may be as many as 1500 to 2000 users using the one ip....the technology is still under development but the concept is very interesting. Check their web site out for your self and enjoy :)
    http://anon.inf.tu-dresden.de/index_en.html
     
  2. JayK

    JayK Poster

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    Yes we are aware of it. Are you aware of a small problem JAP had a few months back which shook the confidence of it's users?
     
  3. musicman

    musicman Registered Member

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    Jay K...
    Thanks for the advice appreciate it...Yes I am aware of it. Darn its hard to find a good privacy software to say the least. Just wanted to let those know about jap if they were not aware of it...Thanks again for your input. :D
     
  4. testg

    testg Guest

    So are cops allowed to look at the logs now?

    What was the full story?

    Thanks?
     
  5. musicman

    musicman Registered Member

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    In response to your question, to a degree yes they were allowed at one point however this issue is now tied up in the German courts. Here are 2 text statements from Jap web site.
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    Attention! The first release of JAP is downloadable free of charge and already protects your privacy against most observers like your ISP, your network operator, or your boss. However, this version does not yet achieve the full security and anonymity that we strive for. It does not protect you against an adversary who has the capability to observe all communication links on the Internet

    also..........this statement............

    District Court in Frankfurt confirms legal claim of AN.ON


    In a decision from Sept. 15, 2003 (5/6 Qs 47/03), The District Court in Frankfurt has confirmed the legal claim of the operators of the anonymity service in the Internet, AN.ON, and made clear that there was "no legal ground" for the request by the German Federal Bureau of Criminal Investigation (FBCI) to record communication data within the AN.ON service. The statements made in the appeal document by the Independent Centre for Privacy Protection (ICPP) were "correct".

    At the same time, a decision by the Lower District Court in Frankfurt achieved by the FBCI on July 3, 2003 was reversed.

    The project operators had defended by use of an appeal against this decision that put them under the obligation to record connection data within AN.ON. At first, they achieved a partial success when the district court reversed the decision. Now the AN.ON operators have been successful in the main case, too.

    The decision about the appeal by the ICCP referring to the search and confiscation decision by the lower district court by use of which the FBCI had enforced the delivery of the only data record which had been recorded until the reversion of the recording decision by the lower district court.

    The project partners expect that everything else but a reversion of this decision through the district court would be a "surprise".

    By the district court’s decision, the project partners are borne out in their principle to operate their anonymity service strictly according to the present laws. On the one hand, this means that the right to use the Internet anonymously derived from the German Constitution and definitely guaranteed by the Teleservices Data Protection Act is defended against all attacks and will be consolidated by technological developments in the future. On the other hand, this also means that AN.ON, just like everybody else, has to consider judicial directions based on §§ 100a, 100b of the Code of Criminal Proceedings.

    The project partners have underestimated the strained relationship between the AN.ON users’ legal claim for transparency and the legal obligation to not impeding the criminal investigations. In this situation, the project partners acted in an uncertain and not consistent way. Although the usage has rather increased within the last weeks, the project partners have lost some AN.ON users’ faith by this behaviour.

    The project partners regret this and apologize for the occurred irritation. Meanwhile, they have specified and published their policy on questions about the relationship between AN.ON and the criminal prosecution and are about to clarify uncertainties concerning the legally allowed extent of transparency in cases of judicial decisions to recording data according to §§ 100a, 100b of the Code of Criminal Proceedings and publicize the results.

    Finally, the project partners point out that they have tried everything to defend the AN.ON users’ anonymity.

    Again, they attach great importance on the ascertainment that it was not AN.ON that endangered the anonymous Internet usage but the proceedings by the FBCI against AN.ON without any legal grounds, as defined by the District Court in Frankfurt.

    Therefore, they call the AN.ON users to defend the right to anonymity, along with the project partners, against all attacks and also against plans in the German Parliament’s Upper House to change the right to anonymity in the Internet into the providers’ obligation to record data
     
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