Isn't DCS ENTITLED to defend their program?

Discussion in 'Trojan Defence Suite' started by spy1, Nov 5, 2004.

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  1. spy1

    spy1 Registered Member

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    Personally, I believe that DCS is entitled to protect their software from piracy - to me the only question is - how far?

    Back in the distant past, they went so far as to totally disable TDS-3 itself, if it was determined (by whatever means) that it was a pirated copy of TDS that was involved.

    I totally agreed with that.

    Thoughts? Pete

    (a) DCS isn't entitled to use any means whatsoever to determine whether an incoming request for an update is coming from a pirated copy of any of their software.

    (b) DCS is entitled to properly validate an update request by any means they see fit

    (c) DCS should simply disable the ability of pirated copies to update

    (d) DCS should (if possible) completely disable the program in question and cause it to un-install itself as well - after displaying to the user of said program a message to contact DCS within three working days to clarify the status of their program use (i.e. - whether they're running a registered version of the program).
     
  2. spy1

    spy1 Registered Member

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    Personally, I believe that DCS is entitled to protect their software from piracy - to me the only question is - how far?

    Back in the distant past, they went so far as to totally disable TDS-3 itself, if it was determined (by whatever means) that it was a pirated copy of TDS that was involved.

    I totally agreed with that.

    The only problem I had with it was that it wasn't clearly spelled out BEFOREHAND anywhere (a) what measures would be taken to identify a registered copy of the program and (b) what measures would be taken if a pirated copy was detected. (Those two items are an absolute must AFAIC).

    Now, of course, I'm pre-supposing that a notice/warning would be given before anything was done - and that these would be given top-priority, speedwise, in resolution attempts (i.e. - verifying with the user the registered/non-registered actual status of the program in question).

    Thoughts? Pete
     
  3. Bubba

    Bubba Updates Team

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    Hey Pete,

    As you can see....I have merged your two threads you started into one.

    Carry on :cool:
     
  4. redwolfe_98

    redwolfe_98 Registered Member

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    i don't see a problem with any company protecting their product from piracy..
     
  5. spy1

    spy1 Registered Member

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    Bubba - Thanks - that was supposed to have been a poll included in the original post, but the wording was too long. Pete
     
  6. Pilli

    Pilli Registered Member

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    Hi Peter, Every company has a right to protect their property thats for sure.

    I think this thread may have been better phrased say in more general terms rather than DCS specific. As opinions on the could vary on what people feel about the particular company so maybe "Should every company / individual have the right to defend their software and / or intellectual property"

    Cheers. Pilli - Enjoy your weekend
     
  7. Wayne - DiamondCS

    Wayne - DiamondCS Security Expert

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    Just as Pilli said, Pete your comments seem more general about all software rather than specifically about TDS or DCS, and it's a problem that plagues all developers of digital content (including for example, musicians and programmers) so Pete maybe we should close this thread and open up another thread that addresses this whole issue rather than just our program? :)

    Enjoy the rest of the weekend,
    Wayne
     
  8. spy1

    spy1 Registered Member

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    I don't have a problem with closing the thread, I just wanted some input - preferably from a software developer with some balls, as well as the users of that particular software. Pete

    * I am one of the one's who have purchased your software - and I don't feel particularly charitable towards people who steal it and get to use it.
     
  9. Wayne - DiamondCS

    Wayne - DiamondCS Security Expert

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    Right, but then why us in particular? :)
     
  10. spy1

    spy1 Registered Member

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    Why not you? I consider you a leader with an excellent line-up of programs.

    Is software piracy of your stuff no longer a concern there? If so, I'll withdraw the question entirely. Pete
     
  11. Pilli

    Pilli Registered Member

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    Certainly it is and Wayne is one of the strong defenders but this should be a general question that all the developers etc. can reply to i.e. Not just DCS specific :)

    Thanks. Pilli
     
  12. spy1

    spy1 Registered Member

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    K. Lock this one down or delete it, if you wish. I'll try to come up with some good, universal wording tomorrow. Gotta get ready for work. Pete
     
  13. Wayne - DiamondCS

    Wayne - DiamondCS Security Expert

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    I'm more than happy to contribute to your questions, but seeing as the problem equally affects all software vendors including other ones here it just seemed strange that you made it a specific question to us rather than a more general thread where other vendors can also have their say, that's all.

    On the contrary, we do everything we can to prevent piracy as we have an obligation to our legitimate customers to protect their investment.

    The reality is that it's impossible to prevent digital media from being changed. Red Eye Reduction in your camera is a good example of manipulating existing digital media. Another example is cracking a program, usually by instructing it to jump over things registration checks.

    So, it's impossible to make a program crack-proof. It's a very similar evolution to what happens with virus vs. anti-virus ... when a new virus is released it has the upper-hand because nothing can detect it, but within a week or so the anti-virus companies have usually developed detection for it. If the virus author then wants to beat the anti-virus he'll have to modify the virus to become a new variant. Likewise when a crack is released - the program is usually updated fairly quickly to nullify the crack, although usually a few days is given first to let the cracker "move on" to another program, as it's annoying (and less glory) for crackers to constantly have to come back and re-crack programs they've already cracked, especially if they're been working on other programs in the meantime.

    I don't want to get into specifics for obvious reasons, but hopefully that helps.

    Cheers,
    Wayne
     
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