is it best to use an identical drive to make an image of another drive?

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by jonjan, Aug 12, 2006.

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  1. jonjan

    jonjan Registered Member

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    Hello :)

    I have 2 WD 36gig Raptors, in RAID1

    I want to make an entire drive image of that raid.
    Would it be best to use another identical WD Raptor 36gig drive to create the image onto?

    or is a larger drive needed?
    or any other suggestions or informtation would be appreciated too :)

    JJ
    www.helpusall.com
     
  2. furballi

    furballi Registered Member

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    The resulting image file is only as big as the amount of data on the source HDD. Maximum image compression may reduce the file by another 40 to 45%. Treat the image file as any other file. Once the HDD is 90% full, then it's time to make more room for additional data.
     
  3. jonjan

    jonjan Registered Member

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    so then, it would be wise to use a drive larger than the source drive.

    Am i understanding correctly?
     
  4. furballi

    furballi Registered Member

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    Nope. Let's say your source HDD is 36.0GB but only 1.0GB is used for data. If you create the image file of the source HDD with zero compression, then the resulting image file would be 1.0GB. The 35GB of unused space is NOT imaged. With compression, the resulting image file may be 0.6GB.

    If your destination HDD is a little larger than this image file (0.6 to 1.0GB), then it will be able to store the image file. In genenal, the destination HDD or media must be larger than the image file.
     
  5. jonjan

    jonjan Registered Member

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    thank you for explaining this more :D ... I understand this part now.

    Since the RAID array is also my XP boot drives, I want to make sure I am imaging it correctly so I can use the image to boot from in case of a problem with my RAID.
     
  6. jonjan

    jonjan Registered Member

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    thank you for the advice !

    is there a way i can create and restore images, without putting my data at risk?

    I already have important data on the RAID drives, and would not want to lose/corrupt it in the case of a faulty restore
     
  7. Xpilot

    Xpilot Registered Member

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    The way to be 100% risk free when restoring a disk image is to remove the source disk, replace it with a spare disk and restore to this new disk. Your source disk is not even connected to the computer while this process is performed so it is its own perfect backup.
    I use this method of swapping hard disks on my own desk top machine. Installing an exchangable hard disk assembly and a couple, or more, drive trays makes the whole job simple and painless.
     
  8. jonjan

    jonjan Registered Member

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    great :D i can do this, and it'll help a lot to know if Acronis will work reliably.

    I am reading through the user manual.

    I want to make a copy of my boot drive, including the OS, programs, applications , windows settings, all files, documents, etc, everything.
    So if my boot drive gets corrupted, I can just reformat it, and install the copy to it, and get it working just like it was before.

    So is "Disk Clone" what I want to do? or do I want to create an "Image"?

    thanks.......
     
  9. jonjan

    jonjan Registered Member

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    I just realized that it will be easier for my to use the Clone feature.

    I can make a Clone of my RAID1 drives.
    Then if there is a problem with the RAID drives, I can uninstall them, and install the Cloned drive.
    And then I can use the Intel Matrix to copy that drive contents to another drive, to re-create the RAID1
    :D:D:D

    It seems easy enough

    I'll use the same exact brand and model hard drive, so the Clone will be fully identical, and I'll test the Clone copy to make sure it acts like it should.

    Am I missing anything?
     
  10. Xpilot

    Xpilot Registered Member

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    Cloning would certainly do the job.
    I prefer the image followed by restore method for the following reasons.
    1. I can keep several images on a slave drive so that, if needed, a restore can be made to an earlier time.
    2. The source and destination drives are not connected to the same computer at the same time thus removing an admittedly small risk of a power problem harming both disks.
    3. I only have room in my PC for one exchangable drive rack so to make a clone I would have to use an external drive or adaptor and have to open the case.
    4. Backup images can be scheduled to run when required automatically. I don't think clones can be so organised.
    5. It is a long while since I made a clone but I am fairly sure that the image/ restore process takes less time to complete.
     
  11. jonjan

    jonjan Registered Member

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    thanks
     
  12. Acronis Support

    Acronis Support Acronis Support Staff

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