IP Address

Discussion in 'privacy technology' started by unholyone, Feb 24, 2004.

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  1. unholyone

    unholyone Registered Member

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    Does ID Blaster change your IP Address that is sent out when your on line?
     
  2. LowWaterMark

    LowWaterMark Administrator

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    No, ID Blaster can not do that. That type of thing could only be accomplished using some sort of proxy, which is a very different thing.
     
  3. unholyone

    unholyone Registered Member

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    Re:IP Address / Proxy ?

    How does a Proxy work?
     
  4. spy1

    spy1 Registered Member

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    Basically, your request for whatever information gets submitted to any one of a number of servers ("anonymous" or otherwise) other than those at your ISP.

    The information goes back to their server, then your computer.

    Unless you're using something really high-dollar (that encrypt's your requests before transmission to the proxy, sends the information back encrypted, then de-crypts it on your computer, uses "secure tunneling", etc.), you're basically just spinning your wheels.

    Un-encrypted requests or returned information can be read/captured (by your ISP should they decide to do so), and, regardless, you're an open book to whomever you've got the proxy service with - they do keep logs (for various amounts of time) and all your requests and transmissions are right there with them.

    Let a person from any number off "three-letter-agencies" stroll into their office and verbally request any of that information and they will happily hand them your head on a platter.

    This isn't even considering the fact that proxies can slow down your surfing (especially on dial-up), are un-reliable as regards consistent availability and may even get you in trouble if it's one you got off someone's "list of proxies" that really isn't authorized for such use.

    If you want to just maintain a low-profile and are willing to put up with all that and you are not betting your life that you can't be "tracked" or identified, there're plenty of options you can play with. HTH Pete
     
  5. LowWaterMark

    LowWaterMark Administrator

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    Here's a thread that asks the question "Who do you trust?" in terms of proxy usage...

    http://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=3582
     
  6. Valkyri001

    Valkyri001 Registered Member

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    o_OSo lwm, if I have two computers hardwired together can't I use the (1) connected to the internet as my own personal proxy and use the (2) to do all my work from?
     
  7. LowWaterMark

    LowWaterMark Administrator

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    Well you could, but all you are doing is running all traffic from the second PC through the first one. That's fine if the second PC doesn't have a direct Internet connection of its own, and this is how you are connecting it to the web, (you're really describing more of a network access method than anything else there), but that's not really what the above question and answers are about.

    "Proxies" are used in a lot of different ways. There are software packages that run locally on your system that are used mainly to filter and manage network traffic. (A tool like Proxomitron is such a package.) There are proxy modules available for firewalls which allow filtering and management of network traffic to the outside world. There are remote proxy servers that people use to mask their public IP address from some specific destination site they are visiting on the web. There are also proxy farms (like the massive ones at AOL) that serve as control points and large web caches used to enhance Internet access and performance.

    The original poster above did not give much in the way of details regarding their question and ultimate goals, so we're really are only providing general information based on the assumption that they are interested in anonymous proxies used to mask public IP addresses to remote sites. That's what the thread linked above and spy1's comments are about.
     
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