Installing Mandriva Linux - Full tutorial

Discussion in 'all things UNIX' started by Mrkvonic, Jul 6, 2007.

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  1. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Hello,

    I have written yet another full, step-by-step text and image tutorial, this time, covering the installation and setup of Mandriva Linux. The tutorial includes the installation itself, basic configurations like package management, software updates, firewall setup, and more.

    http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/install_mandriva.html

    The tutorial for PCLinuxOS, which is based on Mandriva, is coming soon.

    Enjoy.
    Mrk
     
  2. zapjb

    zapjb Registered Member

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    Yes, yes PCLOS. I'll give that a read. :D :thumb:
     
  3. Meriadoc

    Meriadoc Registered Member

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    Good tutorial. I have an XP/Mandriva dual boot on a family computer.
     
  4. lodore

    lodore Registered Member

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    nice tutourial of mandriva.
    its a shame none of the mandriva ftp links work atm.
    lodore
     
  5. wilbertnl

    wilbertnl Registered Member

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    Very, very nice, Mrk.

    Based on my recent experience with installing (X)Ubuntu, Mandriva, Xandros, openSUSE, ZenWalk and Debian I would say that the interesting part of any installation is seting up wireless networking.

    I own wireless adapters with Ralink RT73 and Atheros chipsets, and getting these babies to work with WPA enabled is sometimes quite an excercise.

    Linux Magazine includes monthly a DVD with usually the latest release of a popular distro. Next month will be Fedora 7. This magazine is a great source for the distro collector!

    Also, it would be interesting to discuss the Debian netinstall distro, because that gives the user all the opportunity to create a real personal setup:
    almost nothing pre-installed, which software would you select?
     
  6. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Hello,

    Thanks for the feedback.

    I'm not using wireless as I hate the word wireless... but once I get it, I'll post for sure.

    What would I choose, clean install? Uh-oh. That's problematic. Well, most of the software I have listed under A (cool) list of Linux tools.

    But those would be: Firefox, GIMP, Amarok, MPlayer, VLC, VMware Server, OpenOffice, FileZilla, BlueFish, K3B, Samba, Amule ... that's what I can think of in 3 minutes.

    This is strictly programs. Add to these various plugins, codecs, sub-apps that make life easier and faster...

    Mrk
     
  7. chew

    chew Registered Member

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    Thank you for :thumb: another good tutorial. I am definately learning Linux next.

    Slight hijack.

    I think one peace information that I desparately need for a person who is trying to build up a rig from scratch is ... hardware compatibility... I wish someone could put a list out.

    For now which latest Intel Core2Duo MicroATX Mobo is compatible with Linux ?

    :D

    P/s: I read somewhere someone had triple boot with two Linux (KDE & Gnome) and XP ... wow ...
     
  8. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Hello,

    I'm running a machine with triple boot (XP, SUSE /w KDE, Ubuntu), 3 machines with dual boot ...

    Which distro would be compatible? Well, insert any of the distros that come with live CD installer. If you can reach live session without disabling or changing anything, then you can install it too.

    Mrk
     
  9. wilbertnl

    wilbertnl Registered Member

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  10. chew

    chew Registered Member

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    wilbertnl,

    Thank you very much for the info you have indeed save me loads of ££$$ :thumb:.

    I think I will dual or triple boot my old Dell Inspiron 8100 laptop instead and save the £££ for Apple Mac perhaps next year if I still feel like I need one. I have been reading the hardware compatibility and somehow building from scratch might take a long time trying to find suitable Micro ATX mobo that I want.

    Apparently my laptop is so "old" everything has been catered for in Linux especially Ubuntu. My HD is only 60GB with 512MB RAM so I guess that will be enough for me to use it as a "learning" machine.

    Tricky bit is repartitioning it to FAT or whatever the compatible with Linux and M$. Since I have Power Shadow on my system and Partician Magic I hope it will not mess up things for me eventhough all my important data are back up in external HD. I just hate reinstalling if I mess up as and I have only reformatted twice in my life due to HD failure after 3 years. So I will give it sometime before I attempt (cold sweat ...).

    Anyway ... back to reading now ...

    Cheers

    :D
     
  11. chew

    chew Registered Member

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    Triple boot I want! LOL!

    By the way on your XP do you have Power Shadow on? I mean install in XP? If you do does it create a problem if I repartition the HD? Only one HD on my laptop by the way.

    Initially I partition my HD using Partition Magic and wonder if that is ok using Ubuntu own partician?

    Also I have drive C for XP programmes (20GB) and Drive E for data/storage (40GB). All in NTSF (oh NSTF?) format and will I be able to free up some Drive C and E to form new FAT32 (or whatever format) for Linux ...?

    :D
     
  12. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Hello,

    I'm not using Power Shadow. I do use ATI for imaging, but without its boot loader.

    As to making partitions smaller, I would not play with C. D is ok. But you have to ask yourself how much space do you want to dedicate to Ubuntu. For normal work, you'll need about 4-6GB or more.

    Mrk
     
  13. wilbertnl

    wilbertnl Registered Member

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    I installed Linux on a ancient laptop too (HP Omnibook XE-gf), I spent most of the time with getting WPA enabled wireless working. XFCE4 is the desktop of preference for me, it's lean and feature rich.
    And the Debian 4 (Etch) distribution is growing on me...

    I read that you are interested in triple boot, and I get the feeling that you are interested in different desktops, like KDE and Gnome. If my feeling is correct, then you could also consider installing both KDE and Gnome in one Linux installation. No need for separate partitions with Linux! In fact, you are able to install a different desktop (KDE, Gnome, XFCE4, FVWM2, Windowmaker, IceWM, Enlightenment) for every day of the week!
     
  14. chew

    chew Registered Member

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    Thanks wilbertnl & Mrkvonic.

    Sounds like Linux could be a lot of fun giving it's ability to mix and to match as one likes. One can even use both KDE & Gnome in one Linux installation :thumb:.

    So far base on the replies from Wilders' forum I have short listed the followings. (Criteria is to find one that suits or compatible with my Dell Inspiron 8100 laptop with plenty of support and ease of use for beginner).

    In no particular order.

    1) Ubuntu (they even have dedicated Ubuntu forum for Dell PC. Excellent).

    2) PCLinux2007.

    3) Arch Linux.

    4) Xfce.

    Now I am reading materials on partitioning without having to do a total reformat. I am in the middle of a project now so can't do that but in 3 to 4 months time I will have plenty of time to mess about.

    I think I will allocate max of 10GB -15GB for Linux and the rest of the storage can go to external hdd.

    I think triple booting is too soon for me with my limited knowledge.

    LOL! having one different distro for each day ... one day I might just try that. LOL!

    Question:

    Since my HDD is formated in NTSF (NSTF ? ) can I reformat back part of HDD to something that's compatible with both NTSF and FAT32 (Linux)?

    My initial partition was using Partition Magic ... hmmm ... hope that will not mess thing up for me.

    :)
     
  15. wilbertnl

    wilbertnl Registered Member

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    Ubuntu (Gnome desktop) is a great choice, there are also Xubuntu (XFCE desktop) and Kubuntu (KDE desktop). It is possible to merge all three the *ubuntu's.

    Linux is able to read NTFS and there is a Windows XP driver available that enables you to read Linux (ext3) partitions.

    Resizing your current NTFS partition isn't a big deal, just make sure it's defragged, to reserve space at the end of the partition.
     
  16. chew

    chew Registered Member

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    wilbertnl,

    Just found this thread on Wilders regarding NTFS and Linux what do you think?

    https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=179294&highlight=NTFS

    So does it mean I do not have to format to FAT etc?

    Cheers

    :)
     
  17. wilbertnl

    wilbertnl Registered Member

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    As a regular Windows XP user, I'm not that much of a NTFS expert. I do believe though that NTFS is a very difficult area for developers. The fact that is took 12 years to release a stable and solid driver doesn't sound convincing.

    But when you as linux user are able to read files on a NTFS partition and as windows user you are able to read AND write on a Linux ext3 partition, I don't see an urge for a separate FAT32 partition.
     
  18. zapjb

    zapjb Registered Member

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    It's PCLinuxOS. Current version PCLinuxOS-2007. Or PCLOS for short.

    Right off the bat. 2 points. PCLOS installs twice as fast as ubuntu & runs faster. Oh point 3, I find the PCLOS forums friendlier & more helpful.
     
  19. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Hello,
    I must disappoint you there before the tutorial but:
    They run equally fast and install equally simply.
    APT is much slower in PCLinuxOS due to non-premium servers method.
    Mrk
     
  20. zapjb

    zapjb Registered Member

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    That is not my or others experience(s). But I acknowledge that it is your experience.
     
  21. FastGame

    FastGame Registered Member

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    So what are we talking here, PCLOS vs Ubuntu...or...PCLOS vs Mandriva ?

    Not so, there's repo's for PCLOS that are every bit as fast (if not faster) as Mandriva or Ubuntu if thats the subject.....

    BTW, PCLOS and Mandriva are closely related so the guide prolly will work for both, how did Ubuntu get in this thread ? :D
     
  22. zapjb

    zapjb Registered Member

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    Cause I'm turning into a ubuntu basher.

    And I saw Mandriva & said heres another opportunity to bash ubuntu.

    Or cause I made a mistake.
     
  23. FastGame

    FastGame Registered Member

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    You weren't the one who first brought up Ubuntu ;)

    but you're right in that case.....PCLOS and Mandriva are faster :D
     
  24. Kerodo

    Kerodo Registered Member

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    I will agree with you that PCLOS installs faster. I did a full PCLOS install in 9 minutes here, whereas Ubuntu took closer to 20 if I remember right. However, both seem to run about the same responsiveness-wise.. Both forums are good also. Ubuntu is good, but in my experience, PCLOS is the only one where literally everything works out of the box, no tweaking required. My choice: PCLOS hands down... :)

    One of these days I will get around to trying out Mandriva also...
     
  25. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    Hello,

    After years of AV wars, we have a Linux war! Ye!

    Seriously, I have found only marginal difference between most modern distros.

    Regarding the flexibility, ease of use, user support etc:

    I believe Ubuntu has the best and fastest community.
    I believe Ubuntu embodies the APT in the best possible way.
    I believe PCLinuxOS builds well on Mandriva and offers some very nice tricks.
    I believe PCLinuxOS has a great growth potential.
    I find the separation between free and premium servers for either Mandriva and PCLinuxOS versus to be a disadvantage compared to Ubuntu repos.

    But since this is free software and a free world, enjoy them all!

    More about PCLinuxOS in the tutorial, coming soon ...

    Mrk
     
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