Inside the Global blacklist, Secretly Shadowing Millions

Discussion in 'privacy general' started by RockLobster, Mar 12, 2018.

  1. RockLobster

    RockLobster Registered Member

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  2. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    I wonder if Mirimir is on such lists. Anyone who has ever posted about Tor? Who reads The Intercept?

    But the key thing, I'm pretty sure, is that my meatspace identity is not on such lists. Unless they include all VPN users, which seems unlikely.
     
  3. RockLobster

    RockLobster Registered Member

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    I think its a good thing to be on it, in the spirit of people like Alex Jones, Steve Piecezenik, Bruce Schneier and many others who wont be intimidated into silent acceptance by the threat of surveillance like the millions of sorry *** ******* that are.
     
  4. deBoetie

    deBoetie Registered Member

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    There is no incentive to keep information accurate in any sense, because there is no redress for harm for the individuals. The current law of standing is disastrous when it comes to this class of B2B information, because there is no context to even be aware of the existence of the information, let alone being able to challenge it and seek damages for careless and negligent statements in it. And the parties in the B2B transaction don't care much if the information is 20% inaccurate.

    I'm not even sure that the information would be covered by things like the GPDR because of the lack of standing in the transaction.

    For a long while, there was a blacklist of contractors for the building trade in the UK which the majors subscribed to, managed by a private company. Took many years and ruined careers before that became uncovered and stopped.

    Even more insidious, in my opinion, is the amalgamation of rating systems for things of this sort, where you kind-of have a "credit rating" for various risks, not just financial ones. These would be algorithmically constructed with no basis and no oversight and checking - completely opaque and even harder to challenge.
     
  5. RockLobster

    RockLobster Registered Member

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  6. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    I wonder whether the Right to Be Forgotten applies to such lists.
     
  7. deBoetie

    deBoetie Registered Member

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    There is now a report finding that UK Police were involved in providing information to unlawful blacklists used by employers to vet candidates.

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news...assed-personal-files-to-blacklisters-says-met

    The problem that will escape none here, is that with the indiscriminate "legal" access provided to bulk datasets on individuals - to the police and a myriad of other organisations, this type of abuse is even easier to achieve, and extremely hard to nail. For example, trade union leaders and activists are likely already automatically "suspects" and subject to additional scrutiny and selector marking. It would take no big leap to exfiltrate that data in some way, particularly since the number of security policy boundaries is so extensive due to the number of individuals and organisations with access, and clearly lax.
     
  8. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    There are efforts to facilitate sharing of information and resources among police of EU members. Without delay and complication of judicial oversight. And they've reached out to the US. There's also https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_&_Jurisdiction_Policy_Network
    Interesting times, no?
     
  9. deBoetie

    deBoetie Registered Member

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    The Cloud Act in the US explicitly gives connection by approved foreign LE into companies in the US without warrant, and collateral US citizens involved will automatically be bought into the net and presumably notified to US LE, again, without warrant.

    Of course, that mode of operation certainly includes the same in the converse direction.

    The implication is effectively a global police force operating hot pursuit with no controls or process. What could go wrong?

    It's extremely worrying that there's been no effort at making MLAT more efficient, and the delays associated could easily be mitigated by a modest investment in process and tools. They don't want to be bothered with all that pesky constraint on their monitoring of communications, or that there might be constitutional or rights issues.

    Constraints like GDPR and the HRA are excluded, they claim, from this essential work against serious crime and national security.
     
  10. RockLobster

    RockLobster Registered Member

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    I wonder is there a word or a term to describe the activity of coercing a population into documenting every intimate detail of their lives so it can then be analyzed by the justice system to find things to arrest them for.
    We already know government will criminalize things that were previously not considered criminal acts and allow the new law to be applied retrospectively.
    There is no telling how many, probably millions of people will know, they better not try to achieve anything in their lives, attain any position that makes them stand out from the crowd because back when they were in college...
    This all should be considered an attack on humanity and I dont think that is to sensationalize the situation.
     
  11. RollingThunder

    RollingThunder Registered Member

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    Here's a thought. Disconnect from the internet (Faraday computer room) and don't own a cell phone (Faraday bag) You suddenly have privacy when you want it! Wonder how long it will take them to make it illegal to not have a cell?
     
  12. RockLobster

    RockLobster Registered Member

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    For most people its too late for that when everything about them is already in the cloud.
     
  13. hawki

    hawki Registered Member

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    "The LAPD Uses Palantir Tech to Predict and Surveil 'Probable Offenders'

    Analysts with the Los Angeles Police Department are reportedly using Palantir software to direct officers to surveil “probable offenders” throughout the city, many of whom are not criminal suspects but have been spotlighted by the company’s predictive technology, according to LAPD documents..."

    https://gizmodo.com/the-lapd-uses-palantir-tech-to-predict-and-surveil-prob-1825864026


    Palantir Technologies is a private American software and services company which specializes in big data analysis.
     
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