In privacy victory, Microsoft wins appeal over foreign data warrant[Updated]

Discussion in 'privacy general' started by ronjor, Jul 14, 2016.

  1. ronjor

    ronjor Global Moderator

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  2. deBoetie

    deBoetie Registered Member

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    I've never bought the argument that MLAT was too slow. It might mean some work and a bit more process, but if lessons from the Chilcot report mean anything, it's that international agreement and some due diligence and accountability is sensible in the medium/long term.
     
  3. Palancar

    Palancar Registered Member

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  4. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    Impressive :thumb:
     
  5. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    This is highly important for American companies. The backlash will be, safe harbor or not, companies and individuals will refuse to host their data with American companies, even outside of the USA.
    Mrk
     
  6. ronjor

    ronjor Global Moderator

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    Microsoft fights US in high court to protect global business

     
  7. EASTER

    EASTER Registered Member

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    Interesting development. But could be rushing things a bit?
     
  8. itman

    itman Registered Member

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  9. RockLobster

    RockLobster Registered Member

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    Has the justice dept ever said if the data they requested belongs to a US citizen or not?
     
  10. JoWazzoo

    JoWazzoo Registered Member

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  11. Minimalist

    Minimalist Registered Member

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  12. JRViejo

    JRViejo Super Moderator

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  13. ronjor

    ronjor Global Moderator

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  14. RockLobster

    RockLobster Registered Member

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    ...and no one questions the outrageous practice of applying new laws retrospectively. It's almost comical.
    May as well scrap the entire proceedure of law and just say, the 1% can do whatever they want.
    They have it all sewn up regardless.
     
  15. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    Yes. Well. As I've been saying. It's not prudent to be indiscreet. Just because you're not doing anything that's illegal. Currently, anyway. Or because you're protected by some technicality. Or some third party's position. Or whatever. Stuff happens.
     
  16. RockLobster

    RockLobster Registered Member

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    Yes but when you feel you need to be discreet about what you say and do because in future that may be made illegal retrospectively is that not a form of intimidation?
     
  17. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    Sure. But then, I've been using whatever drugs I like, for decades. I'm intimidated, and so I'm careful.
     
  18. ronjor

    ronjor Global Moderator

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  19. Nanobot

    Nanobot Registered Member

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  20. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    Sure, sure.

    I wonder when China will start demanding access to stuff in the US about the Dalai Lama, and other so-called "criminals".
     
  21. Palancar

    Palancar Registered Member

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    This is bad. About the only solution I see for "normal" folks using email is something along the lines of Protonmail (this is not a plug for PM). Users would have a password protected GPG key to access their email account and the account would be unlocked locally on their computer after entering the credentials. If the model was followed in truth the email database could only be opened by knowing the password to unlock the key. Would the "normal" user designate their password as 123, or something real?

    One thing I don't like about Proton's approach is that I don't get to generate my own full keyset -LOCALLY, and then upload that as my key. This always leaves the nagging question of a backdoor'd key, like what PGP does for their corporate clients. They have an Admin key and a user key. There is no positive way to know Proton doesn't have an Admin key, that you will never be aware of. Not saying they do, by why not allow a user to locally generate the pair and upload it? Call me paranoid but it does create doubts. Perhaps that would be a way of gaining more paid users. The uploading of a locally generated key could be a paid only feature. I would pay for two of my free accounts in exchange for removing that nagging doubt from my head.
     
  22. ronjor

    ronjor Global Moderator

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    U.S. top court rules that Microsoft email privacy dispute is moot
     
  23. mirimir

    mirimir Registered Member

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    Oops :(

    Really ought to edit the thread title, no?
     
  24. ronjor

    ronjor Global Moderator

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    Supreme Court drops Microsoft data privacy case, but the battle isn't over

     
  25. Palancar

    Palancar Registered Member

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    Sucks. Sounds more like now M$ can simply say the law says we have to turn stuff over. Back to my Proton approach a few posts up in this thread. Next, they'll say its illegal for a company to use the "Proton" approach, but hopefully there will be jurisdictions that can't be touched on that policy.
     
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