IE10 malfunction after Drive Migration

Discussion in 'Paragon Drive Backup Product Line' started by mikestrauser, Sep 18, 2013.

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  1. mikestrauser

    mikestrauser Registered Member

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    I migrated from one Seagate drive to another (both 500GB) because the old one is 4 years old and I am concerned about it failing - other like machines in our office have recently.

    After the migration, IE10 is not working right. I can put the old drive in and it works fine. When I did the migration I chose to do an "HDD raw copy" so I am pretty surprised that anything would be different.

    I have tried the copy twice with the same results. I did this on 8 other PCs in our office and this is the only one that acted up.

    IE10's problem is that it won't download files from websites - it gets stuck after you answer the "Open, Save, Cancel" question.

    Mike.
     
  2. Mech_An

    Mech_An Registered Member

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    Maybe you can just re-install IE on this problem PC?

    From Programs & Features - Windows components you can disable IE (it will be uninstalled) , clean the IE folders in Program files and Program Files x86 (if exists). Then from the same wizard in control panel - enable it back.
     
  3. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

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    While the problem can very likely be resolved by a reinstall or whatever, the issue is why did it happen.

    My first thought is that the new drive has a bad sector and since the image was a raw, it used the same bad sector on the second try.

    I would run chkdsk /r on the new partition. In fact, I recommend you download the Seagate diagnostic utility and run it - the vendor's diagnostic programs are more effective at finding problems than chkdsk.
     
  4. mikestrauser

    mikestrauser Registered Member

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    Mech_An,

    I did the uninstall of IE10 and IE9 works fine. I am not sure what you mean by "clean" the IE folders. They exist in both Program Files folders but appear to have IE9 stuff in them.

    seekforever,

    OK, I will try analyzing the drive. The weird part though, would be why a previous uninstall of IE10 and reinstall of it didn't fix the issue (but IE9 worked).

    Mike.
     
  5. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

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    It could be that IE10 ended up using the same location again and IE9 put something different there or didn't use it. May be a bit improbable, but certainly not impossible.
     
  6. mikestrauser

    mikestrauser Registered Member

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    Well I found SeaTools to be less than helpful. It gives you no information when you run diagnostics on the drive. Chkdsk found some thing but again not much information...

    I am going to try to Migrate the drive again on Monday and I can scan the old and new drive then too. Any better ideas for software to check the disks with?
     
  7. Robin A.

    Robin A. Registered Member

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    The simplest thing to do is to check the SMART parameters and the general "health" of the disk with programs like Hard Disk Sentinel, HD Tune Pro, CrystalDiskInfo.
     
  8. mikestrauser

    mikestrauser Registered Member

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    Well, I am still puzzled. I used HD Sentinel to scan both the original drive and the new drive. Both are clean - no bad sectors (did a read on the whole drive) - SMART parameters all good.

    So I erased the new drive and tried a drive migration again. Exactly the same results. Used HDD raw copy and still IE10 is malfunctioning on the new drive (won't open documents from links).

    Any other ideas?
     
  9. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

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    Not really, though I'd suggest you try SeaTools for DOS if you didn't since it deals with a static HD.

    I'd also try a regular image and restore rather than a RAW but that really shouldn't make any difference or may mask the real problem.

    Did you try the drive on a different port?
     
  10. mikestrauser

    mikestrauser Registered Member

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    I was thinking about a non-RAW migration but was concerned about applications working correctly, but I can try it.

    When you say a different port what exactly do you mean? After the copy, during the copy?

    Mike.
     
  11. seekforever

    seekforever Registered Member

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    Different port for the drive receiving the image. I admit this is a real long shot since if the port is bad you would not expect the exact same problem to arise time after time, but if there is nothing else to try...

    A RAW image copies every sector whether used or not and restores them to their original position. A regular image restore does not necessarily put the sectors back in the the same locations but adjusts the file system to account for any changes. This is the normal mode of operation and it works just fine. It is also a lot faster since it only copies the sectors that are being used. However, I can't see any reason why the RAW shouldn't be fine as well.

    I think you might be able to rule out a lot of things by trying to restore the same image to a different drive. Why not use one of the ones you took out of service from the other machines? You might also consider using a different PC to restore the image to but then put it in the "problem" machine before booting.
     
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