Hum. Linux.

Discussion in 'all things UNIX' started by sosaiso, Apr 6, 2006.

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  1. sosaiso

    sosaiso Registered Member

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    So, feeling brave, I am deciding on installing Linux on my system. But before I do that, I just have a few questions.

    I know there are many different types. Which would be the easier to use for someone who is just transitioning?

    And are there any good step-by-step sites that I can look into before tinkering?

    Second, I want to format one of my harddrives. Would that get rid of every partition?

    Thanks.
     
  2. dog

    dog Guest

    I'd suggest Mandriva :)

    I suggest if you have partition software already available ... create say 15GB EXT3 partition and a 750MB Linux Swap ... it is possible to use the installer to do this for you, using available free space. Use the KDE desktop which is the default for Mandriva it's the most Windows Like.

    If you decide to use Mandriva you'll want to check out and use http://easyurpmi.zarb.org/ ... then you'll have almost everyhting you'll ever need. :D

    Regards;

    Steve
     
  3. sosaiso

    sosaiso Registered Member

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    Thanks a lot, dog.

    Are there any compatibility issues I should be aware of? I am truly clueless about anything in Linux. Basically all I need to operate should be Office and Acrobat for work and other purposes. But do most software that is ready for windows work in Linux? Or is it like converting to a Mac, where barely anything works?
     
  4. Alphalutra1

    Alphalutra1 Registered Member

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    Openoffice is the free replacement for microsoft's office(so it will make the same file types like word, excel, powerpoint, etc.)

    Also for windows programs, WINE will let you run many windows programs in linux or bsd.

    If you are into trying out linux distros, i recommend opensuse 10(5 cds, so it is a large amount of downloading).

    Aside from linux, PC-BSD is amazingly easy to use, and is the incredibly stable and secure free bsd os with a gui. Installing files is so easy, all you do is download a pbi from the pbi website located Here and double click it and you will click next a couple of times and you are done!

    I am loving it so far.

    Alphalutra1
     
  5. sosaiso

    sosaiso Registered Member

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    I may be presuming, but lot of this looks heavy on the resources.

    Will an older computer be able to handle these systems?
     
  6. iceni60

    iceni60 ( ^o^)

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    Linux uses much fewer resources then Windows and is used on lots of old computers.

    i think the best thing to do is try a livecd first (you boot into it from your cd/dvd drive) there's no install. that way you'll know if Linux will detect all your hardware.

    if you try Ubuntu you can put this command into a Terminal Window (like DOS) -
    lspci -n

    then put the output into here to see if Ubuntu can support your hardware.

    here's a podcast just for new Linux users, if you listen to the first few it will tell you everything you need to know :cool:
    http://www.linuxreality.com./
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2006
  7. clansman77

    clansman77 Registered Member

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    sosaiso
    if you format your harddisk it will get rid of every partition in that harddisk.
    but you can selectively format some partitions from your harddisk if you wish to.

    i support your idea of trying out linux.installing and learning linux is fun.but dont expect a smooth ride always.its about selecting the right distro for your needs and sticking to it.u can face several problems like hardware detection issues.but at the end you wont regret it..first my advice is to try some live distros(almost all of the distros have live versions) and find out which suits you and get a feel of linux.but beware that live cds are very slow since they are booting from the cd and use your ram for apps..installed versions are significantly faster .

    you can try live versions of
    -knoppix
    -ubuntu
    -mepis
    -mandriva
    -opensuse

    etc....

    for a complete noob mandriva ,open suse,mepis,xandros,linspire,fedora are goood.
    ubuntu,debian,are the other popular ones.
    i personally use ubuntu coz it has excellent hardware detection and a very good support forum like here in wilders..
    if you signup with shipit.ubuntu.com they even sent you free copies of both live and install cds for free---absolutely freei got mine like that.it takes around 3 weeks...

    some useful links are..
    http://distrowatch.com/
    http://www.ubuntuforums.org/
    http://linuxcommand.org/
    http://www.tldp.org/guides.html
    http://www.zegeniestudios.net/ldc/index.php

    so thats all.try out linux and once you get past that noob feeling you wont look back...:D :cool:
     
  8. dog

    dog Guest

    You'll find everything you'll need (program wise) ... I find open-source programs are much of the time better than their closed-source commercial partners. Linux is very friendly now, you don't need to be a geek at all - the help resources available on the net are fabulous. I've tried every distro mention except mepis; Mandriva I find the best, excellent repository (see link above) with almost everything imaginable - It's extremely popular (3rd overall - according to distro watch / Ubuntu 1st and SuSE 2nd) so help is abundant. But as mentioned above Ubuntu has the best support/help of any distro IMO, it's very comprehensive. But with this being your first venture I'd really suggest Mandriva or SuSE, they have graphical installers that no other distro's beats in regards to easy of use; everything is clearly explained.

    Linux is my main OS; I completely moved over about six months ago and haven't looked back. I still have WinXP and a couple of other distro's installed, but never really boot into them, but they're there incase the need arises.

    Backup your current HD before proceeding, partitioning in advance is suggested ... then dive right in and install :) If you find somethings difficult at first, stick with it - seeking out help - within a couple of weeks you'll be breezing along - I promise.

    Have Fun :D

    Steve

    PS. Trying "Live CD's" first is also very sound advice ... you can get a good feel for the distro and also check your hardware is supported.
     
  9. sosaiso

    sosaiso Registered Member

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    Okay, thanks for all the help. I think I'm going to create a live cd first. Most likely Ubuntu as the live, but Will us Manadriva if I decide Linux is for me.

    I guess I'm just going to format my D: drive [all that is on it is a bunch of .dat files that I have no idea what they do. :T] and then try everything from there. It's limited on harddrive space, but I guess I can live with it.

    So, correct me if I'm wrong... Make live CD. put CD into drive. Boot into CD. ~Wha-la~ linux?

    And one last thing, clansman77, how does one just format one partition? I've never formatted in my life. :T
     
  10. sosaiso

    sosaiso Registered Member

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    On a sidenote, which Linux looks the prettiest? Or is there an inherent ability to skin Linux?
     
  11. iceni60

    iceni60 ( ^o^)

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    looks aren't an issue with Linux because you can change *everything* very easily with a few mouse clicks. that's really the main thing about Open Source or Free Software, although it's free (money-wise) the free bit is really about the programming code - you are free to change and do what you want with it.

    the philosophy behind Linux is freedom, rather then being locked into Microsoft products which only work with other MS software with no access to the code and support only coming from MS. when MS wants a new product maybe 10 people will work on it, a new Free Software program can have a few hundred and everyone can look through and check the code. that's why alot of people think Free software is better quality.

    but, as you ask, i think a little known distro called Fox is the prettiest
    http://shots.osdir.com/slideshows/slideshow.php?release=538&slide=29&title=fox desktop 1 screenshots
    http://linclips.crocusplains.com/index.php?page=clip&id=22

    here are screenshots of all the distros
    http://shots.osdir.com/

    and here are some screencasts
    http://linclips.crocusplains.com/index.php

    but, DON'T pick a distro by the way it looks. some have very little support, both in the way of help and also software which will work on them, some are also very, very difficult to install. Ubuntu is a very good first distro because there are 1000s of active contributors making sure it works, whereas something like Fox might just have one person doing all the work! and as i said you can make any distro look like any other. it's the internals which are important.

    here's a video showing how to install Ubuntu
    http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-6104490811311898236&q=ubuntu&pl=true

    and here's another
    http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=1946306951426939016&q=ubuntu&pl=true

    here's a useful link for dual-booting
    http://users.bigpond.net.au/hermanzone/

    the Ubuntu install CD will partition your drive for you. you can either dual-boot or wipe the drive and just install Ubuntu. i used a livecd first to check it detected my hardware. it mostly did, but i had to spend some time getting my modem to work.
     
  12. iceni60

    iceni60 ( ^o^)

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    if you are willing to spend abit of money you can use this to migrate from windows to Linux, it does work with Ubuntu too now.
    http://desktoplinux.com/news/NS7367638855.html

    there's one thing about Linux, because it only supports free software the base install of Ubuntu, and many others which are free, won't play MP3s and some videos and a few other things which use proprietary codecs/software. (there is a free Ubuntu program (Automatix) though which will install all that stuff for you with a mouse click so it's no big problem), it lets you decide what you want to install, browsers, codecs, music players, anti-viruses, office programs - anything you can think of, then installs it all for you :D

    http://img147.imageshack.us/img147/107/automatix5xz.jpg

    but, there are afew Linux distros which you can pay for that have these proprietary things pre-installed, i'm thinking mainly of Linspire. so it might be something to think about. but, for support you can't beat Ubuntu, the forum's similar to Wilders' but with an average of about 700 people.

    http://www.linux.com/article.pl?sid=06/03/12/209257
    http://www.pcworld.com/reviews/article/0,aid,124519,00.asp#
    http://www.pcmech.com/show/os/917/
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2006
  13. TheQuest

    TheQuest Registered Member

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    Hi, sosaiso

    Also do not miss trying KANOTIX LiveCD [or intall it] there are 32 and 64 bit Versions.

    Take Care,
    TheQuest :cool:
     
  14. Alphalutra1

    Alphalutra1 Registered Member

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    Another idea.

    If you download Vmware Player, you can download vm images from the internet and try out products through windows, without making any changes to your pc.

    There is a good list of all the premade virtual machines here

    It also is nice for distros and OS's that don't have livecds. In addition, it runs faster from my experience. Very nice for dangerous surfing and p2p :ninja:

    Alphalutra1
     
  15. iceni60

    iceni60 ( ^o^)

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    can all those vm OSs be used on the free player or server or whatever the free version is? i've got a syllable.vmx i got from a linux magazine, it came with one of the vm players too but, i just don't trust vmware after i used one of their free programs and it ended up 'timing out' and stopped working :mad:
     
  16. sosaiso

    sosaiso Registered Member

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    iceni60, thank you so much for all the links and advice. I am listening/watching/everything right now.

    As for vmplayer, I was thinking the same alpha, but I am so low on harddrive space right now, I am going to forgo using that as an option. Much thanks as well though.

    But as of right now, what I have narrowed it down to is... unbuntu, kanotix [thanks thequest. I shall look into this one], and dog's suggestion of mandriva.

    I'm going to try Unbuntu first though. I have heard many good stories about that one as well, and am looking forward to their cds in the mail. 3 weeks to wait. I must study instead of tinkering with my comp all day. :T

    I will let you all know how I go when it rolls around. All your help is much appreciated.
     
  17. dog [away]

    dog [away] Guest

    As Ice mentioned out of the box, some stuff isn't included ... but it is easily found and added. Use the link in my first post and follow the instructions ... there won't anything you can't play or do. :ninja: The output will look something like this
    Code:
    urpmi.addmedia plf-free ftp://ftp.mandrivauser.cz/plf/mandriva/free/2006.0/i586 with hdlist.cz 
    urpmi.addmedia plf-nonfree ftp://ftp.mandrivauser.cz/plf/mandriva/non-free/2006.0/i586 with hdlist.cz 
    urpmi.addmedia --update updates ftp://mirror.cricyt.edu.ar/MandrivaLinux/official/updates/2006.0/main_updates/ with media_info/hdlist.cz 
    urpmi.addmedia main ftp://mirror.cricyt.edu.ar/MandrivaLinux/official/2006.0/i586/media/main with media_info/hdlist.cz 
    urpmi.addmedia contrib ftp://mirror.cricyt.edu.ar/MandrivaLinux/official/2006.0/i586/media/contrib with media_info/hdlist.cz 
    urpmi.addmedia jpackage ftp://mirror.cricyt.edu.ar/MandrivaLinux/official/2006.0/i586/media/jpackage with media_info/hdlist.cz
    Copy the entire text and Open console; you'll need to enter SuperUser mode by typing SU -> then enter roots password (using sudo - won't work here as it's multi-step) ... right-click within console and select paste and then hit <Enter> ... it'll update the repository. After it's all updated exit SU/Console ... and have a look at all the new software available for you to install. :D

    Have Fun

    Steve
     
  18. sosaiso

    sosaiso Registered Member

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    Nice. I didn't know about the not being available out of box, but I will keep this in mind when I'm pulling out my hair that my mp3's aren't playing. "oh right... they told me that this was going to happen."

    On a side note:
    I'm getting confused. Both dog, but one is |_|b3R l337, and the other is normal. ?.?

    haha.
     
  19. dog [away]

    dog [away] Guest

    Hehehe Ya we're both the same person ... I use my normal account dog from home, and dog [away] @ work / I just don't have the time to dedicate to moderating so I use a different account. But I ain't uber leet either way. :p :ninja:

    MP3 will play out of the box, it's video codecs that usually need to be installed. Using urpmi or if you decide to go with Ubuntu using Ice's suggestion it'll be a breeze ... You'll never miss Windows. :)
     
  20. clansman77

    clansman77 Registered Member

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    there are many ways to format your partition.probably the easiest is rightclick the partition from within windows (the one partition u want to format -it should be a non system drive )and choose format..:D ofcourse the installation media of any linux distro /windows also give u the choice to format/create/delete partition.linux is better in this regard..also there are specific free and paid softwares available to do the job-acronis,paragon,ranish partition manager,partition magic etc to name a few..
    but i suggest u dont worry about this.during installation of linux there is an option about partitioning.choose manual partioning and u can manually edit the partitions...i think mandrivas and suses partition managers are best in this regard ubuntu and mepis is also not that bad.there are screenshots available of the installation of any linux distro in the net.google them have a look at them to get a fel of what to expect b4 u actually install linux.
    dont get upset atfirst if something is not working in linux.hang in there and u can solve it urself and u wont lookback.try the ubuntu live cd first see how much ur hardware is detected .then if u like it install ubuntu.or else install either open suse or mandriva ...both of them are very good and provide some outof box support for novices..


    @iceni60-
    what kind of modem was that ??an internal dialup??i had a conexant internal one and didnt get any luck with it.had to use the speedcapped driver version from linuxant.got only 14kbps with it.so i purchased one external serial one just for linux..:D
     
  21. aigle

    aigle Registered Member

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    I tried puppy linux and DSMl live CDs but for me biggest poblem is that I don,t know even ABC of command line, so I was just clicking here and there, knowing nothing what to do, like u are in a country u don,t know theie language. I was really fed up. How to know basic commands. I was not even able to know where is my HD or USB drive!
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2006
  22. iceni60

    iceni60 ( ^o^)

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    it's a USB SpeedTouch 330

    to check Ubuntu will work with your hardware, put this into a command line window from a linux livecd - Ubuntu, Knoppix, Kanotix, Puppy Linux etc
    lspci -n
    then put the output of that command into the link below
    http://kmuto.jp/debian/hcl/index.cgi

    NOTE you don't need to be using the Ubuntu Livecd - just any Linux livecd
     
  23. sosaiso

    sosaiso Registered Member

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    Hum.

    About this whole codec business. I watch a LOT of anime, and they're all encoded to mkv/ogm/lots of other names. If it so happens that it doesn't play on linux, where do i go to look for codecs?

    And this command line business does not look too appealing.

    [still waiting for cds, and procrastinating.]
     
  24. aigle

    aigle Registered Member

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    This is an interesting tool to choose linux distro.

    http://www.zegeniestudios.net/ldc/
     
  25. dog [away]

    dog [away] Guest

    I haven't found anything I haven't been able to play ... I know for sure mkv will play. Once you've used urpmi to update the repository, simple go into the add software function, use the search box to find all the available codecs and grab the media players MPlayer and VLC - this is all done thru a GUI. ;) Much of linux can be navigated/used without the need for using console/command line ... although over time, with a little effort it'll become easier and more comfortable to use, and you'll find yourself using it more and more. :)
     
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