How-to handle a rootkit invasion

Discussion in 'Acronis True Image Product Line' started by TommyTechnology, Jun 3, 2006.

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  1. TommyTechnology

    TommyTechnology Registered Member

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    IF you had a rootkit installed on your system and try to "ignore" it by installing a TI9 image backup, will that work?… i.e. does the installation of a TI9 partition image backup onto C: drive erase those parts of the partition that the rootkit is clinging to?? Am I even phrasing this so it makes sense what I am asking? Would you need to format the drive completely? o_O
     
  2. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

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    Restoring an image performs the essentially the same functions as a format, so if that would eliminate a rootkit, restoring an image will also.

    Unless someone creates a new super rootkit, restoring an image of the boot drive will eliminate it. That's why image backups are so valuable.

    By the way, backups are usually at least a few days or weeks old and restoring one will delete all data created since the backup. If this is a problem, make an image immediately BEFORE retoring the older image.

    You can safely retrieve your data files from the image without worrying about the rootkit reactivating.
     
  3. TommyTechnology

    TommyTechnology Registered Member

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    Thank you for that speedy reply JMK! I am assuming from your reply that it does not matter that I am only restoring the C partition from an image archive of just the C Drive… Basically I keep all my data on my D partition, I used TweakUI to relocate the various important folders such as MyDocs and such to that partition when I built up the system, and various registry hacks where needed, also tell Firefox to locate the Bookmarks.htm file on that drive as well. I only use webmail interfaces for mail.

    I then pretty much just surf with just a name brand anti-spyware and firewall software (no anti-virus software), and if (it actually has not happened in a long while) I suddenly find some malware doing the funky chicken on my desktop then I can put in the TrueImage Boot CD, reboot and restore from the image of the C Drive without hesitating to think if I am losing something – the restored OS immediately is "linked" back up to the data because the data was on D all along.

    My question came from reading a PCMag story about how some of the newer viruses were combining rootkits (new versions Bagel apparently), and I wanted to be sure that my strategy was still valid in the face of those threats.

    Anywho thanks for the input!:cool:
     
  4. jmk94903

    jmk94903 Registered Member

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    Unless something gets stored on D which doesn't make much sense since a rootkit needs to load at bootup and would be expected to be only on C, your procedure should be fine.

    As a precaution, you could image both C and D to protect both the system and your data.
     
  5. TommyTechnology

    TommyTechnology Registered Member

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    10-4, and thanks again...:D
     
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