How to do non destructive partition resizing?

Discussion in 'backup, imaging & disk mgmt' started by Izettso, Oct 2, 2007.

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  1. Izettso

    Izettso Registered Member

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    I have two physical disks. One has a C and a D drive on it and the other one is drive E. C drive is 118GB and D drive is 2GB. E drive is 475GB. The total used space on C drive is 59.9GB. The data on D drive can be deleted, if necessary during the resizing process.

    I would like to resize C drive and reduce it to, say, 15GB and at the same time increase my D drive to 105GB.

    What software and steps would you say I need to do the above task?

    (For the record this thread is a follow on to https://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=187031)
     
  2. AKAJohnDoe

    AKAJohnDoe Registered Member

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    I don't see how that is possible.
     
  3. HURST

    HURST Registered Member

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    As far as I know, it would only be possible to resize C to 59.9 GB without doing some data transfer. If you have some space left on E drive, yo could move the entire data on C to E, resize, and then fill the 15GB. You could then do whatever you want with the other 44.9 GB (leave them on E or store them on D).

    I use partition magic, or gnome partition editor (for linux).
     
  4. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

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    Izettso,

    These were my comments. Are the figures accurate?

    I'd move My Documents to your external HD or your second HD. Do this from the My Documents Properties. This will leave 15 GB of used space in your C: drive. I'd then resize the C: drive to 30 GB and resize the D: drive to take up the remaining space. You could then move My Documents to the new D: drive and from the My Documents Properties in your C: drive, point it to My Documents on the D: drive.

    The second HD will be used mainly for backup. Does this all make sense? You can do the partitioning without losing any files.

    When you agree with the numbers I could go into specifics.
     
  5. Izettso

    Izettso Registered Member

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    Brian K

    The folder sizes on C drive are as follows according to their respective Properties:

    Windows: 2.09GB "On Disk" and "Size" 2.06GB
    Program Files: 2.89GB "On Disk" and "Size" 3.16GB
    Documents and Settings: 46.5GB "On Disk" and "Size" 46.5GB

    Based on what you wrote, moving the My Documents folder to the D drive will move the contents. Will it then leave an empty My Documents folder on the C Drive?
     
  6. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

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    Not really. There will be no My Documents folder in the C: drive.

    Could you check the used space of My Documents. My Documents isn't the same as Documents and Settings. It's only My Documents that will be moved. All of the other folders of Documents and Settings remain in the C: drive.

     
  7. Izettso

    Izettso Registered Member

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    OK, My Documents takes up 48.9GB

    I noted the procedure that you quoted in your last post. So, I should transfer the My Documents folder to my E drive that has adequate capacity, run a partition program to resize drives C and D accordingly, and then move My Documents to D drive.

    I'm thinking of using Partedmagic for the resizing task.

    Would you say allocating 15GB to C drive would be enough?

    Once more, thank you for your patience with me. Clearly, this task is something that makes me very nervous and I would hate to mess things up! I consider your advice crucial, but of course I will never hold you responsible for whatever might go wrong. :)
     
  8. newbino

    newbino Registered Member

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    Rightly so, nervous not but concerned yes, after all these are your data! It's imperative, before doing anything to a partion containing important data, to back them up AND insure the backup is working.
     
  9. Izettso

    Izettso Registered Member

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    I did it! I didn't use Partedmagic, because I found it difficult to understand how to do it. I used Partition Magic instead.

    I made the C drive equal to about 20GB.

    However, there is something odd: The Properties for drive C shows that the used space is 12.4GB or 13,414,866,944 bytes. If I add the filesizes of hidden and unhidden directories on C drive the total comes up at 9,101,499KB. That I make to be 9,319,934,976 bytes. So where are those "missing" used bytes? o_O
     
  10. Menorcaman

    Menorcaman Retired Moderator

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    Hello Izzetso,

    What percentage of the drive have you allocated to hold Windows Restore Points (Control Panel > System > System Restore > Settings)?

    Regards

    Menorcaman
     
  11. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

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    Could you check this? That figure is larger than Documents and Settings.

    Even so, lets assume your C: drive after moving My Documents is going to contain less than 7 GB of used space. Then a total C: drive of 15 GB would be fine. Make it 20 GB if you think you might be installing large apps in the future.

    Yes. Use that procedure each time.

    OK. I've used it too. It's the same as GParted and Gnome Partition Editor that others have mentioned. I hope the instructions I posted for using the app are adequate. Just ask if you are confused.

    Is your D: drive a primary partition or a logical volume in an extended partition? This will be shown in WinXP Disk Management.

    When you first use partitioning software it is scary but the chance of something going wrong is small. You have your backup image anyway. Moving data is the slowest part of partitioning so when you resize your C: drive it will probably take 10 minutes to move all the data to the start of the HD. Just be patient.

    The following isn't for you. It was written for another situation but there may be some similarities.

     
  12. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

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    Izettso,

    I missed a few of the recent posts. I didn't know you had Partition Magic. Good work.
     
  13. Izettso

    Izettso Registered Member

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    Menorcaman, I didn't calculate or allocate any space specifically for Windows Restore Points. I just guessed that 20GB may be adequate, given that 12.4GB were already used.

    Brian K thank you for the additional information about Partedmagic. I remembered at the last moment that I used to have an old edition of Partition Magic (which I had never used before) and I decided to try it. My D drive is a logical volume in an extended partition.

    I don't know if it's a coincidence, but it seems that opening new pages on my web browser (Firefox) is a little bit faster than what it used to be, after the resizing of the partitions.
     
  14. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

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    You have 4 GB "missing".

    By default your pagefile will be 1.5 times your RAM

    By default your hibernation file will be 1.0 times your RAM

    System Restore points probably account for the rest.

    I turn off Hibernation and System restore. I also reduce the size of the pagefile.

    http://aumha.org/win5/a/xpvm.htm

    The hibernation file and pagefile are not included in a SnapShot image. That's good.
     
  15. Izettso

    Izettso Registered Member

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    Brian K, I counted the pagefile and the hibernation file sizes. See attached screen capture. If it's not explained by anything else, then it must be the System Restore!
     

    Attached Files:

  16. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

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    Izettso,

    Great graphic. Now that is weird because System Volume Information contains your System Restore points so they have been counted too.

    Do you have a Norton Protected Recycle Bin? I had that once. Lots of files in the Recycle Bin that I couldn't see. But I can't recall if it produced a false used space problem.

    Do you get the same figures for each folder when you use Windows Explorer?

    What used space do you see from DOS? eg using your Partition Magic boot disc.

    By the way. You could move (just cut and paste) your Favorite Pictures folder to the D: drive if you like. It should be with your other data.
     
  17. Hermescomputers

    Hermescomputers Registered Member

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    You can use partition magic it does this nicely.

    Partition Magic Publisher's Description

    Key Technologies

    * Partitions hard drive
    * Create, resize, copy partitions
    * Run multiple operating systems

    Features

    * Divides hard drive into two or more partitions
    * Runs multiple operating systems on the same PC
    * BootMagic™ makes it easy to switch between operating systems
    * Copy, move, resize, split, or merge partitions
    * Guides you through the partitioning process
    * Easy to find, copy and paste files in both Windows® and Linux® partitions
    * Create and modify partitions up to 300GB*
    * Supports USB 2.0, USB 1.1, and FireWire® external drives**
    * Supports and converts partitions among FAT, FAT32, NTFS, Ext2, and Ext3 file systems
    * Enlarge an NTFS partition without restarting computer
    * Resizes NTFS system clusters to the most effective size

    I use it all the time and it works!
     
  18. Izettso

    Izettso Registered Member

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    Brian K,

    The image was taken from Total Commander which I normally use as my file manager.

    I don't use Norton Protected Recycle Bin.

    Running chkdsk from DOS shows the following information:
    Windows Explorer shows the same file sizes as Total Commander (give or take a couple of hundred bytes)

    My Favorite Pictures folder in C drive is empty. I do have a My Pictures folder on D drive, under My Documents. I therefore deleted the My Favorite Pictures folder. (I hope it's not needed for anything)
     
  19. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

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    The challenge is to find those 4 GB. I'm sure you will find the files.

    I'd try TreeSize Pro. There is an evaluation version here.

    http://www.jam-software.com/treesize/index.shtml

    It has helped me to find and delete "hidden" files. On the other hand it may not show any more than Total Commander.

    I'd turn OFF System Restore. Restart and see if that makes a difference. A mystery so far.
     
  20. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

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    Also, any other identities with a profile in the computer?

    It's worth looking at the C: drive from BartPE. You should see all the mysterious files from BartPE.

    "Undeletable" files can be deleted from BartPE. A good trick.
     
  21. Izettso

    Izettso Registered Member

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    I have a "User" account on the PC which is turned off. However, I don't see any way to delete that user from the system. Could it be that the User account is taking up the space? If so, where are the files making up its settings? Shouldn't they be visible to the Administrator? :blink:
     
  22. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

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    The other user will have files in Docs and Settings and they will be visible. I just wondered if files in their Recycle Bin may not show in your Recycle Bin. Just a thought. The BartPE idea is better.
     
  23. Izettso

    Izettso Registered Member

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    I tried doing what you said about BartPE, but I didn't know where or how to look for clues. Perhaps you could tell me which utility or application I should have used.

    Anyway, using BartPE is probably academic now, because your other suggestion gave the answer: I disabled System Restore and the results were as follows.

    Before disabling System Restore
    13 789 667 328 bytes used space and 7 184 760 832 bytes free space

    After disabling System Restore
    9 262 161 920 bytes used space and 11 712 266 240 bytes free space

    For the record, I re-enabled System Restore after doing the above exercise.

    Thank you once again. You have been very patient with me and in the end you solved the puzzle!
     
  24. Brian K

    Brian K Imaging Specialist

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    Thanks. I've learned something too. I thought System Restore points showed in System Volume Information. In the System Restore properties I suggest setting a maximum value of say 500 MB. That's enough for 5 to 6 points.

    In BartPE you would use the A43 program. It's like Windows Explorer. You need to get on top of BartPE in view of your SnapShot plugin. Unless you are happy restoring from DOS.

    I'm pleased it worked out. I've been using SnapShot batch files more than I did before. It's fun.
     
  25. Izettso

    Izettso Registered Member

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    I was using A43 a little while ago from a USB memory stick, because I wanted a portable file management program. I didn't however have enough time to investigate all its features because the circumstances changed and I could use Total Commander instead.

    I'm really delighted with the new arrangement (operating system on a different drive than the data). Backup is now much simpler, more flexible and faster.

    In addition, overall risk has been reduced. Whereas before I risked losing both OS and data from, say, a bad backup, now it's statistically more probable that if such single event would occur I would lose either the OS or the data backup rather than both.
     
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