How the Government Is Waging Crypto War 2.0

Discussion in 'privacy general' started by lotuseclat79, Aug 10, 2016.

  1. lotuseclat79

    lotuseclat79 Registered Member

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    How the Government Is Waging Crypto War 2.0

    -- Tom
     
  2. Minimalist

    Minimalist Registered Member

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    French Government Wants A 'Global Initiative' To Undermine Encryption And Put Everyone At Risk
    https://www.techdirt.com/articles/2...-undermine-encryption-put-everyone-risk.shtml
     
  3. Minimalist

    Minimalist Registered Member

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    Apple encryption war continues: NY DA requests 400 iPhones be unlocked
    http://www.techrepublic.com/article...inues-ny-da-requests-400-iphones-be-unlocked/
     
  4. Palancar

    Palancar Registered Member

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    Long term it seems to me that use of unbreakable encryption needs to be purposely handed over to the end user. Explaining: On my laptop (made by a major manufacturer) I can and do employ open source encryption products, which I believe are impenetrable except for any operator errors. Why this is KEY is that it releases the mfg of my laptop from "pressure" by any 3 letter agency. There is no one to lean on and mandate a "backdoor". The end user is solely responsible for how he/she decides to handle the pressure to provide the decryption credentials.

    Why can it not be the same with Apple, or any manufacturer of devices? Surely in a free society (pipe dream) the end user (owner) of the device can elect to equip it according to their wishes. Then THEY bear the burden of defending their position regarding opening it.

    While simple, this model removes all the public debate about banning Apple phones in America. Other players are going to find themselves in line too. Further; this model makes ME the end user more confident in possessing solid unbreakable encryption. I see it as a win win.
     
  5. deBoetie

    deBoetie Registered Member

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    Looking at software development and some of the legal issues, I'm contemplating having a plugin architecture with a reference open-source implementation that do the crypto part as a plugin. It would then be the user's job, if they want strong crypto, to go get that from wherever, nothing to do with me as a producer. Might save a whole load of absurd grief because the authorities and legislation have not done the hard but necessary work of creating international treaties which provide a sensible balance with peoples' legitimate need for privacy and security, and the rule of law; and they persist in counterproductive mass surveillance, which is the prime cause of the demand for encryption in the first place.
     
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