How does DRM work and how's it integrated with Intel CPU's ?

Discussion in 'other software & services' started by Defenestration, May 18, 2006.

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  1. Defenestration

    Defenestration Registered Member

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    I know DRM is related to controlling Media files (eg. Audio, Video etc) to stop copying and piracy, but am not sure how it works on Windows based PC's.

    Also, I've read that Intel processors (Pentium D and Core Solo/Duo) have DRM built-in, and can effectively "call home".

    How exactly do they work ?

    What info is sent when they "call home" ?
     
  2. Lamehand

    Lamehand Registered Member

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    Can you tell where you've got this information?, i've read something about this about the pentium D a couple of months ago, but the core solo/duo part is new to me.

    regards
     
  3. Defenestration

    Defenestration Registered Member

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    It's possible it's not in the Core processors. I just assumed that since it was in the Pentium D then it was also probably in the Core processors as well.
     
  4. Joliet Jake

    Joliet Jake Registered Member

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    So what happens if your DRM intel based PC isn't connected to the internet?
     
  5. Lamehand

    Lamehand Registered Member

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    With such a CPU in your machine you don't want to be connected to the internet,even if it would explode if it detected it wasn't connected. :D


    Lamehand
     
  6. trickyricky

    trickyricky Registered Member

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    DRM doesn't work on any PC. It's a technology which is doomed to failure because it relies on treating honest customers as potential criminals, which isn't that clever a marketing strategy.

    Unfortunately the money-grabbing ba****ds trying to force DRM-everything on us aren't clever at all, just greedy. So they persist with foisting it on us at every opportunity, despite it being wrong.
     
  7. WSFuser

    WSFuser Registered Member

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  8. Lamehand

    Lamehand Registered Member

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    I think the internet is not like food, witch everybody obviously needs, and i for one can live without it if this is the way it's heading, it will be a farce then anyway and pretty useless in my opinion.
    The computer here on my desk will do what i will tell it to do, nothing more and nothing less (at least that's what i try to achieve ;) ) and if some software on it tries to play the 'boss' and does stupid things, it is gone.
    If on one day the only chipset's you can buy are of the 'phoning home' and DRM kind and we are only allowed to pay for it but not own it or have control over it, then the internet will be dead, at least for me, just pull the plug and going to read a good book.

    Lamehand
     
  9. iceni60

    iceni60 ( ^o^)

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    hi, DRM has undeservedly ended up with a bad name as it can be useful in protecting personal information too, it's just that it's always the bad things which make the news.

    if you'd like to hear what a leading Intel expert thinks about this you can listen to this MP3 (note he's a Linux person, but i'm sure it al pplies to your question about DRM and intel)
    http://tllts.info/dl.php?episode=128

    there's a log of the show so you can FF to the bits you want to listen to

    anything which is decrypted on a local computer rather then a remote computer can always be cracked because expert hackers can watch how the decrypting is working then crack it. that's what DVD jon does (he did DeCSS)

    what DRM does is this - you buy a DVD and decide to put in on your Hard Drive. but, the record companies don't want you to do this because they think you might then give away copies to your friends. so DRM is put on your DVD you bought from them to stop you ripping the DVD to your HDD. but, as i said before because the DRM works on your local computer it will always be cracked.

    that's just how i think it works as i haven't ever Ripped a DVD to HDD so haven't looked into it too much, but i have a DVD i'm thinking of ripping :cool:
     
  10. Lamehand

    Lamehand Registered Member

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    I can understand that they (the content providers) want to protect their product in a certain way, altough i think they're going overboard with this. but to put the same thing in a CPU is from a totally different order.
    That has nothing to do with protecting content but with controling what you run on your computer in my opinion.

    I can see it now; somone want's to install a linux distro or an other peace of legit software on his/her machine and suddenly a pop-up jumps up and states "sorry matey, we don't think this is viable software and you won't be allowed to install it and by the way a full report of this illegal attempt is on it's way to your local justice department"

    Iceni, even thinking about ripping a DVD is heighly illegal, so i will have to report you. :D

    Lamehand
     
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