How can I make applications be delayed at startup ?

Discussion in 'all things UNIX' started by cet, Oct 25, 2010.

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  1. cet

    cet Registered Member

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    When I boot the system I want Thunderbird to start automatically.But when I do this it gives errors like:pop3 not ready etc.If I can make thunderbird start 30 sec later it will not give that error.
    I found a thread in the Ubuntu forums about this:but the thread is very old (2006) Can someone please tell me if this is going to work with the ubuntu 10.04 LTS.

     
  2. Mrkvonic

    Mrkvonic Linux Systems Expert

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    You can make an init startup script that launches thunderbird. Or better still, check if popd service is up, and if it is, launch thunderbird, or if not, let it sleep for a few moments, then try again.

    Mrk
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2010
  3. Ocky

    Ocky Registered Member

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    In the Startup Applications I suppose you have added Thunderbird. If so then change the command line entry to bash -c "sleep X; /usr/bin/thunderbird where X is the delay you want (30 secs.)

    You can check -there should be a file in /home/cetorceylan/.config/autostart

    Can be opened:- gedit $HOME/.config/autostart/name_of_file

    I hope that is correct as I have not done it before. Let us know. :)
     
  4. cet

    cet Registered Member

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    In the Startup Applications I suppose you have added Thunderbird. If so then change the command line entry to bash -c "sleep X; /usr/bin/thunderbird where X is the delay you want (30 secs.)I did this and there is a file in home/ceylan...... I opened it with gedit but the file is blank.I waited but thunderbird did not open.
     
  5. Ocky

    Ocky Registered Member

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    You don't need to open the file - unless to edit some lines. Remember to log out and log in for the setting you have entered in the command field to work.
     
  6. cet

    cet Registered Member

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    Ok I did manage to start Thunderbird 30 seconds later after booting up.This worked like a charm.
    I created a new file and saved it in usr/bin/tbstart
    I wrote this script:
    #! /bin/sh
    sleep 30;
    thunderbird

    And after I made the file executable with sudo chmod a+x /usr/bin/tbstart
    And later I added this tbstart to the startup applications.

    I am trying to learn Linux.;) And when I am successful in what I want, I feel happy.
     
  7. Ocky

    Ocky Registered Member

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    Well done cet, I am also happy now having you teach me this method. :thumb:
     
  8. cet

    cet Registered Member

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    I am a good student because my teachers here at Wilders are excellent.
     
  9. mack_guy911

    mack_guy911 Registered Member

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    wow cet

    even i never tried that thanks for teaching me :)

    thanks to you Mrkvonic and ocky :))
     
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