Hey Louisiana! Hey Mississippi!

Discussion in 'ten-forward' started by hubbahubba, Aug 28, 2005.

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  1. mercurie

    mercurie A Friendly Creature

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    This is similar price increase and price for me in the midAtlantic area.

    Here is my predictions:
    Fuel Costs are going to push the economy into a recession the depth of it will depend on the speed to which the refinerys get fired up and running to near normal. Ditto Natural Gas and Heating Oil depending on how much is already stored out of the disaster area. Government opening Petro reserves a drop in a bucket. Nothing.

    Only spot shortages of Gasoline. One station runs out another one has it next day the one that had it is out but the one who did not does now. This type of thing nothing that is not manageable, but the price will be very high.

    The Fed better stop raising rates. :p :p If not citizens will get very :mad:

    Many small local companies gone forever.

    Some Citizens of N. O. will never go back. Made to stay out to long and will start a new life elsewhere.

    Lots more "man made" deaths to come. Shootings, disease due to sanitation, and clean up/repair accidents.

    Price gouging of all kinds. Black Market the government will not know about. Desperate people. :( :'(
     
  2. RobZee

    RobZee Registered Member

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    Good points Mercurie on the refineries being a key factor. Unlike Hurricane Ivan, which was a major hurricane that affected oil facilities last September and had a more lasting impact on crude oil production in the Gulf of Mexico, it appears that Hurricane Katrina may have a more lasting impact on refinery production and the distribution system.

    There are several factors currently inhibiting refinery production. First, employees that were evacuated from their homes need to return to work. It may be some time before authorities let people back into the most severely impacted areas.
    Then a factor affecting the refineries in the Midwest is the lack of crude supply from the Gulf. Even with the release of crude from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, they must find a way to transport it to their Midwest refineries.

    Given the quasi-monopolistic nature of the major oil companies, it may be time to put some price caps on the fuel prices as was done in 1973.
     

  3. Price caps are guaranteed to cause shortages and lines at gas stations like the 1970's. Price caps only make it so that oil companies have no incentive to supply the oil, so they will then allow the shortages. Of course, we could always become a communist state.


    NO price caps
     
  4. Trekk

    Trekk Registered Member

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    Price caps may not be the answer, but its quite obvious there is price jacking going on. I realize the oil companies themselves arent solely responsible for price per barrel, the prices are set by the market. Are we doing this to ourselves? IS this the product of our own Brokers driving cost up by purchasing at higher prices in an effort to make us more return on our investment? The more they purchase, the higher the price. It has been stated supply currently exceeds demand with reference to OPEC flow.

    When you drive by a gas station and see the price per gallon has raised .50 cents in a few hours, people think the stations themselves are raising the price to make more money. In reality, gas stations raise prices to cover the cost of replacement.

    For example...A 5000 gallon tank at a gas station is holding gas purchased at 1.00 dollar a gallon. Later in the day assuming half the gas has been used they are informed its going to cost them 1.50 to replace the fuel sold. They then raise the cost of the gas remaining, to cover the cost of the fuel they will be topping the holding tank off with.

    Most gas stations only make a few cents on the gallon.....



    Trekk
     
  5. BeetleBoss

    BeetleBoss She who posts lots of <I>Smileys</I>

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    Kansas is helping.
    ....................................

    Ill Children From New Orleans Evacuated To KC
    Hospital Spokesman Says Some Children's Parents Could Not Be Located


    POSTED: 7:37 am CDT September 1, 2005
    UPDATED: 8:07 am CDT September 1, 2005

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- More than two dozen young hurricane survivors and their families were evacuated to Kansas City late Wednesday night.

    Children's Mercy Hospital offered to take in the children.

    KMBC's Krista Klaus reported that the young patients were being cared for at a children's hospital in New Orleans. But rampant looting and the lack of electricity soon turned the children's hospital there into a dangerous place for them to be.

    The Missouri Air National Guard transported the young patients and their families from New Orleans to Kansas City. They arrived at the Downtown Airport at about 11 p.m. and then were transported to Children's Mercy.

    The hospital's president Randall O'Donnell is old friends with the president of the New Orleans Children's Hospital and offered the assistance on Tuesday.

    Children's Mercy officials said that they do have plenty of room for the children. A hospital spokesman said that some children arrived without their parents. They were apparently unable to locate them.

    They have opened up patient rooms that are typically only used during peak flu season to accommodate the influx of young patients.

    One issue still remaining is finding a place for the families of the kids to stay. Children's Mercy says it's still hammering out those details.

    http://img142.imageshack.us/img142/9563/children0bs.jpg
    ................................................

    KMBC Channel 9's Help From The Heartland
    Donations Will Help Victims Of Hurricane Katrina


    POSTED: 12:38 pm CDT August 29, 2005
    UPDATED: 7:25 am CDT September 1, 2005

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- KMBC-TV and The American Red Cross have teamed up to help out victims of Hurricane Katrina.

    Funds raised from "Help From The Heartland" will be directed to relief efforts.

    Viewers who called a phone bank this week have donated more than $481,000.

    The phone lines will be open again Thursday at 5 p.m. To donate by phone,

    .....................................................

    Heart to Heart

    Heart to Heart is collecting bottled water by truck load down at our local Sam's Club. {Which I will be heading down there soon to buy and donate some. Plus, some $$$}

    http://www.hearttoheart.org/katrina.html

    Heart to Heart Responding to Hurricane Katrina

    Heart to Heart International is responding to the areas hardest hit by Hurricane Katrina. Your help is needed in meeting the enormous needs

    Much of the Gulf Coast area, including the entire city of New Orleans, LA has been evacuated. Approximately 9,000 without a place to go are being sheltered in the SuperDome and more than 8,000 in 78 other shelters in the area. The storm made landfall just east of New Orleans, with Biloxi, MS taking the brunt of winds up to 170 mph. Loss of homes, businesses, and schools will leave hundreds of thousands of people without a home or a job to return to. Authorities estimate as many as 1,000,000 will be left homeless. Hundreds of business, employing thousands of people will be unable to reopen until clean-up and rebuilding efforts can take place. Shelter, safe water, food, and basic sanitation will be the priorities in this as in any disaster response.

    Heart to Heart has a long history of disaster relief. Thorough assessment and timely, pinpoint response has become the hallmark of this humanitarian group headquartered in Kansas City. The disruption of all vital services, the destruction of any organized mass communication and/or transportation systems are the greatest challenge to getting supplies to victims. Our transportation partner, FedEx is on-board again to deliver life saving aid where it is most needed.

    "America is a nation of compassionate and caring people," said Jon D. North, Heart to Heart's CEO. "They have never failed to respond generously to any disaster relief effort we have made. We are working with on-ground partners to get first-hand, up to the minute reports; coordinating with other humanitarian organizations, mobilizing resources where they are most needed - all are important aspects of any disaster response. Communication, coordination and the cooperation of the public in these efforts are all essential. Our greatest need for this response is financial. This allows us to leverage your gifts, securing supplies close to the site to minimize expense and transportation costs as well as maximizing response time. If you want to make the greatest impact quickly, your dollars are the best way to respond."

    Heart to Heart leverages your financial gifts to procure up to 25 times their value in medicines and supplies for its ongoing disaster relief efforts. Donations can be made online at www.hearttoheart.org or can be mailed to:

    Heart to Heart International
    401 South Clairborne, Suite 302
    Olathe, KS 66062

    Providing relief to disaster victims is nothing new for Heart to Heart. Responding to natural and manmade disasters locally, nationally and around the world for more than a decade, Heart to Heart has been your connection to a world in need.

    .....................................

    Posted:8/31/2005 9:50:56 PM
    Modified:8/31/2005 9:50:56 PM
    KU to admit Gulf Coast area college students displaced by Hurricane Katrina
    LAWRENCE - The University of Kansas is offering to assist college students who've been shut out of Gulf Coast universities by Hurricane Katrina. " In acknowledgement of this natural disaster, we are waiving late admission fees, seeking campus housing options and doing whatever we can to assist these families so that disaster of the hurricane does not impede their college careers," said Chancellor Robert Hemenway. "We just want to help."

    .....................................

    Posted:8/31/2005 6:12:03 PM
    Modified:8/31/2005 6:12:03 PM
    Kansas to Send Guard, Equipment to Help Katrina Recovery Efforts
    WICHITA, Kan. (AP) -- Heeding a call for help, Governor Kathleen Sebelius says today she's sending equipment and Kansas National Guard personnel to areas hard-hit by Hurricane Katrina. Kansas will be adding six Blackhawk helicopters with their 40 support personnel to recovery efforts. Also heading to the Gulf states will be 30 five-ton trucks with 70 Guard troops, including a medical team. Touring farms in the Wichita area today, Sebelius said all states have been asked to contribute National Guard personnel and equipment to the rescue effort. The adjutant general's office is coordinating the efforts. Sebelius says she's been in contact with the governors of Mississippi and Lousiana and offered the the state's help and support.
    ..................................

    Relief Concert to Help Hurricane Victims
    August 31, 2005

    NBC is putting on a live, televised concert to help raise money for victims of Hurricane Katrina.

    "A Concert for Hurricane Relief" will air Friday night at 7 p.m. on your NBC Action News station.

    Today’s Matt Lauer will host the hour-long show that will feature special performances from artists with ties to the devastated areas including Tim McGraw, Harry Connick, Jr. and Wynton Marsalis.

    The NBC Universal Television Group is behind the live event that will air on NBC, MSNBC and CNBC.



    I'm real sure there will be a seperate collection taken up at church on Sunday. I also heard on the news last night that {I believe} 12 other countries have stepped up to offer help.....{not sure which ones....maybe someone could find out}

    This could have very easly happened to anyone of us. We should all think about how we would want the our neighbors to react. We're all in this big world together. And diasters can effect any of us at any given time. You just CANNOT ignore the ones that diasters effect. Being on this forum has shown me just how small, kind, and 'real' people from of over this world are. These people effected by this hurricane could easly be one of our loved ones from this forum....or another forum we may belong to. What if you never heard from that good friend again........you'd never know. This is such a sad sad sad event. Nobody caused it. Nobody attacked anybody. This was nobody's fault. And everyone is so desperate there. You just don't know how you would react if this was you. It all just breaks my heart. :'( :'( :'( and it should break yours. This should teach all of us to be sooooo very grateful for the people in our life's, and for all that we have. Instead of all the complaining. At least we have homes to to stay warm and dry in and cars to put gas in!


    http://images.ibsys.com/2005/0901/4923115_480X360.jpg

    http://img307.imageshack.us/img307/685/clipboard016qu.jpg

    http://img234.imageshack.us/img234/524/clipboard018nd.jpg

    List Of Agencies Helping With Hurricane Disaster Relief

    POSTED: 2:20 pm CDT August 31, 2005
    UPDATED: 2:46 pm CDT August 31, 2005

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- City Hall put out a list of agencies Wednesday that are assisting with hurricane-relief efforts.

    American Red Cross -- (800) 435-7669 or (800) HELP-NOW
    America's Second Harvest for hunger relief -- (800) 344-8070
    Catholic Charities -- (800) 919-9338
    Church World Services -- (800) 297-1516
    Network for Good provides easy access for donations to a number of charities, including the Humane Society of America and various chapters of the United Way in Florida and Louisiana.
    Salvation Army
    Feed the Children -- (800) 525-7575
    Operation Blessing for hunger relief -- (800) 730-2537
    United Methodist Committee on Relief -- (800) 554-8583
    Noah's Wish helps rescue and shelter animals during disasters. Send checks to Noah's Wish, P.O. Box 997, Placerville, Ca., 95667 -- (530) 622-9313.
    Convoy of Hope for general disaster relief -- (417) 823-8998
    Samaritan's Purse for general disaster relief -- (800) 567-8183
     
  6. RobZee

    RobZee Registered Member

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    Sorry for going astray in the economic stuff, when the real tragedies continue. The current developments in the evacuation process and armed looters terrorizing the city and even hospitals is terrible.

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20050901/us_nm/weather_katrina_dc
    New Orleans evacuation slows as shooting, chaos erupt

    Rob
     
  7. JimIT

    JimIT Registered Member

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    Good post, BB.

    This is, indeed, a horrific event for the US gulf coast. Even with the news reports and photos from the web--there's NO WAY for us to comprehend the severity of what has happened down there--and how it's going to effect ALL of us--particularly those of us in the UNITED States of America.
     
  8. NICK ADSL UK

    NICK ADSL UK Administrator

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    Well i it has just been reported that Fats Domino is missing he was last seen on Saturday night at his home in New Orleans Fats was born in Antoine Domino in 1928 in New Orleans.
     
  9. BeetleBoss

    BeetleBoss She who posts lots of <I>Smileys</I>

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    Public Health Threat Grows in New Orleans
    25 Babies in Neonatal Intensive Care Airlifted From City
    By MARILYNN MARCHIONE, AP


    (Sept. 1) - As a public health catastrophe unfolded Wednesday in New Orleans, hospitals in the Crescent City sank further into disaster, airlifting babies without their parents to other states and struggling with more sick people appearing at their doors.

    Getting babies out of the New Orleans area became a major priority as there were no supplies in the hurricane-ravaged city.

    http://img320.imageshack.us/img320/9397/clipboard016zu.jpg

    Dangerous, unsanitary conditions spread across the city, much of which now sits in a murky stew of germs.

    The federal government declared a public health emergency for the Gulf Coast region, promising 40 medical centers with up to 10,000 beds and thousands of doctors and nurses for the hurricane-ravaged area.

    In a stunning example of how desperate the situation has become, 25 babies who had been in a makeshift neonatal intensive care unit at New Orleans' Ochsner Clinic were airlifted Wednesday to hospitals in Houston, Baton Rouge, La., and Birmingham, Ala. Many were hooked up to battery-operated breathing machines keeping them alive.

    Their parents had been forced to evacuate and leave the infants behind; by late in the day, most if not all had been contacted and told where their babies were being taken, said hospital spokeswoman Katherine Voss.

    "We actually encouraged them to leave. It would just be more people to evacuate if there was a problem," said Dr. Vince Adolph, a pediatric surgeon.

    Helicopters had to land on the roof of the parking garage to get the babies because water covered the helipad at the hospital, one of the few in the area that had been operating almost normally.

    "We're getting kind of at the end of our rope," with a skeleton staff of doctors and nurses who have been on duty nonstop since Sunday, Voss said.

    Officials were trying to evacuate 10,000 people -- patients, staff and refugees -- out of nine hospitals battling floodwaters or using generators running low on fuel. About 300 people were stranded on the roof of one two-story hospital in the New Orleans suburb of Chalmette.

    Yet even as they tried to evacuate, many hospitals faced an onslaught of new patients _ people with injuries and infections caused by the storm, people plucked from rooftops who are dehydrated, dialysis and cancer patients in need of their regular chemotherapy or radiation treatments.

    "We have thousands of people who are getting ill ... our hospitals need to be prepared to take care of the incoming sick," said Coletta Barrett of the Louisiana Hospital Association.

    Only about 150 patients were able to be evacuated Wednesday from all nine New Orleans hospitals, said Knox Andress, an emergency room nurse in Shreveport, La. He is regional coordinator for a federal emergency preparedness grant covering the state and is involved in helping place evacuees in other hospitals.

    "We're ready for patients and we can't get them. We just can't get them out," he said.

    The government said dozens of medical disaster teams from nearby states were moving into hard-hit areas.

    "We've identified 2,600 beds in hospitals in the 12-state area. In addition to that, we've identified 40,000 beds nationwide, should they be needed," said Health and Human Services Secretary Michael Leavitt.

    Storm survivors, particularly in New Orleans where floodwaters remain, face a cauldron of infectious agents, public health experts said.

    "You can think of floodwaters as diluted sewage," said Mark Sobsey, a professor of environmental microbiology at the University of North Carolina.

    Whatever infections people carry go into sewage and can be expected to show up in floodwaters. That includes common diarrheal germs including hepatitis A and Norwalk virus.

    "We are gravely concerned about the potential for cholera, typhoid and dehydrating diseases that could come as a result of the stagnant water and the conditions," said Leavitt.

    However, officials at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other health experts said cholera and typhoid are not considered to be high risks in the area. CDC officials suggested Leavitt was simply mentioning examples of diseases that could arise from contaminated food and water.

    Some experts said worries about catching illnesses from being near dead animals or human bodies are somewhat overblown.

    "People who are alive can give you a whole lot more diseases than people who are dead," said Richard Garfield, a Columbia University professor of international clinical nursing who helped coordinate medical care in Indonesia after the tsunami.

    Mosquito-borne diseases may start to emerge within days. West Nile virus and dengue fever are both potential risks following a situation like the one in coastal Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana. Officials also cited carbon monoxide poisoning risks to people using generators and stoves.

    "One of the things they have got to do -- we've got to plead for -- is to make sure that when these hospitals get evacuated, the National Guard or somebody is there putting major security around these hospitals, or they're going to get ransacked. And it's going to make a bad situation even worse," said John Matessino, president of the Louisiana Hospital Association.

    He said the four hospitals in New Orleans' central business district -- Tulane, Charity, University and the VA hospital -- had the worst problem with would-be looters.

    Days after the storm hit, many people in key positions to help were still struggling to figure out how.

    The Pharmamaceutical Research and Manufacturers Association asked the government to make a public health assessment to guide drug companies.

    "Once we know what is required, we can begin to donate and ship in desperately needed medicines," said a statement from Billy Tauzin, the group's president and former congressman from Louisiana.

    The American Diabetes Association wants to help get insulin and syringes to diabetics and is working with the Red Cross, but the relief agency "is still very much in 'rescue mode,'" an association spokeswoman said.

    Eli Lilly and Co. said it would give $1 million in cash and would match any donations by its U.S. employees to the Red Cross. The company also is donating $1 million in insulin.

    The American Medical Association's Center for Public Health Preparedness and Disaster Response was trying to figure out a system to help coordinate doctors who want to volunteer.

    "It's going to take years -- years -- to rebuild the medical infrastructure. There will be continuing health needs," said Dr. James J. James, the center's director.

    Associated Press writers Melinda Deslatte and Janet McConnaughey in Baton Rouge, La., Mike Stobbe in Atlanta, and Randolph Schmid in Washington, D.C., contributed to this story.


    9/1/2005 07:11:25
     
  10. BeetleBoss

    BeetleBoss She who posts lots of <I>Smileys</I>

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  11. snowbound

    snowbound Retired Moderator

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    I don't have a link but i just heard on TV that he has been found and is safe.


    snowbound
     
  12. JimIT

    JimIT Registered Member

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  13. CartoonBoy

    CartoonBoy Registered Member

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    It seems like I am a world away from this but the reality is I am not.

    Hope to see some human spirit rise from some of the ordinary stories spilling out.

    I have only prayed twice in my life, it's now three, I pray for everybody effected including all friends at Wilders.
     
  14. ronjor

    ronjor Global Moderator

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    Found a link:CNN
     
  15. bigc73542

    bigc73542 Retired Moderator

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    I was watching CNN and they gave a revised estimate on the amount of New Orleans that is under water and the new figure is 80% plus:'(
     
  16. ~*Nat*~

    ~*Nat*~ Registered Member

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    THAT IS GREAT NEWS AMONG THE SADNESS !!
     
  17. Starrob

    Starrob Registered Member

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  18. Starrob

    Starrob Registered Member

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    "This is not a FEMA operation. I haven't seen a single FEMA guy," he said. He added: "We can send massive amounts of aid to tsunami victims, but we can't bail out the city of New Orleans."

    New Orleans' emergency operations chief Terry Ebbert
     
  19. Starrob

    Starrob Registered Member

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    Donald Dudley, a 55-year-old New Orleans seafood merchant, complained that when he and other hungry refugees broke into the kitchen of the convention center and tried to prepare food, the National Guard chased them away.

    "They pulled guns and told us we had to leave that kitchen or they would blow our damn brains out," he said. "We don't want their help. Give us some vehicles and we'll get ourselves out of here!"
     
  20. NICK ADSL UK

    NICK ADSL UK Administrator

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    For anyone using the above link to follow the local events it is off air at the present time and is now being broadcast courtesy of CBS on the link below which you will have to copy and paste into your browser

    http://www.cbsnews.com/htdocs/videoplayer/newVid/small_player/cbsnews_videoplayer.shtml?clip=LiveWebCast&BaseName=livenews&title=CBS$@$News$@$Live$@$Webcast&castNum=2&mediaType=wmv
     
  21. JimIT

    JimIT Registered Member

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    Convoy of Hope responds to Katrina, offers help from Picayune, Mississippi

    (Link to DONATE at bottom of post)


    Convoy of Hope Disaster Response Teams have established a distribution point in Picayune, Miss. and are traveling further into the affected areas to establish additional locations.

    Cars --often filled with five or six people who are now homeless --were lined up two miles in either direction at the Picayune distribution point.

    Volunteers had served 300 families by 9 a.m. this morning. "The need for ice and water is huge," said Jeff Nene, Convoy of Hope Communications director. "The people we are serving are often in tears, thankful to receive something so small as bottled water and a couple of bags of ice. These are the simple things that we often take for granted."

    More than 30 truckloads of ice, water and food are already in the region or en route. Convoy of Hope is preparing for a response that could require hundreds of loads in the weeks ahead.

    Nene, who has visited tsunami-ravaged Southeast Asia several times, viewed portions of Louisiana and Mississippi from the air. "Even twenty miles north of the coast, the area is utterly unrecognizable," he said. "The need is beyond belief."

    U.S. Disaster Relief Director Kary Kingsland said, "The sweltering heat makes it tough on people and volunteers are fatigued even before they start. But we have to keep working around the clock to help people put their lives back together."

    The best way people can participate in this relief effort is by making a financial contribution. "That keeps the trucks rolling and gets the supplies to people who need the help the most," said Nene.

    OFFICIAL Convoy of Hope Website
     
  22. BeetleBoss

    BeetleBoss She who posts lots of <I>Smileys</I>

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    Way to go!! Kansas!! ....[​IMG]..... [​IMG]

    Help From The Heartland Raises More Than $760K
    Donations Will Help Victims Of Hurricane Katrina


    KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- KMBC-TV and The American Red Cross have teamed up to help out victims of Hurricane Katrina.

    Funds raised from "Help From The Heartland" will be directed to relief efforts.

    Viewers who called a phone bank this week have donated more than $761,000.
     
  23. mercurie

    mercurie A Friendly Creature

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    Help from Friends is Coming

    Hello Fellow Creatures here at the Wilders,

    Based on the latest news reports help from our friends in the world is on the way. Just one word...Thanks

    Of course I am refering to the very bad conditions in the USA Gulf States.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2005
  24. JimIT

    JimIT Registered Member

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    As the human predicament is finally being addressed on a major scale, new crises arise:

    LINK
     
  25. snowbound

    snowbound Retired Moderator

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    IMHO it 's a disgrace how long it took for significant life saving resources and adequate security forces to arrive at the disaster in New Orleans...

    Because of the lolligagging for whatever reason by the powers that be, many lives have been lost unnecessarily....

    On CNN last night the head of FEMA was being interviewed and the question was asked, why nothing was being done for the people at the Convention Centre and the answer was, the President didn't know there was anyone there until wednesday. o_O

    How can that be? Anyone who has been remotely following this knew of the horrendous suffering going on there....

    I realize it is a very difficult situation but surely more could have been done in the very early stages of this catastrophe.

    Shame on u Mr. Bush. U should hang your head low as u tour the devastation.

    I will fully understand if this post disappears shortly. I just needed to say this here as i'm sure many others feel the same way too.


    snowbound
     
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